countrygirl6661

Confidence

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The most important things are to develop and independent seat and gain control of your horse's feet. Working with a good riding instructor should help tremendously. What about your horse intimidates you?

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The most important things are to develop and independent seat and gain control of your horse's feet. Working with a good riding instructor should help tremendously. What about your horse intimidates you?

His size. He's pretty big

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His size. He's pretty big

Size alone is no reason to be intimidated. Some of the biggest horses I have known have been the most gentle. Does he act aggressive? Does he have very expressive movement?

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Size alone is no reason to be intimidated. Some of the biggest horses I have known have been the most gentle. Does he act aggressive? Does he have very expressive movement?

No he's very gentle with me. Doesn't show any aggression. Towards me. I've tried getting on and put my foot In the stirrup and put wait in it all he did was postions him self and then turned and looked at me. The only time Ive seen him buck is if he's being playful around me and that's it. I just get my self to get on him.

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How long have you had this horse? What have you done with him? Have you seen him ridden by other people? What type of experience have you had riding other horses?

Caution is a good thing. It keeps us from getting into a lot of bad situations. Take things one step at a time. It sounds like you did this when you put weight in one stirrup. The next step would be to do the same but lean over the saddle. Then, do the same and stroke the horse all over both sides. It would also help to do this from both sides. We traditionally mount from the left side of the horse, but it is good practice to get the horse used to being mounted from both sides. The more you expose a horse to, the more confidence he will gain if you don't push too fast. As you realize your horse is not frightened by your activities, you should gain more confidence to actually straddle him. Then, gently squeeze with your legs and ask for a walk.

Walk, stop, and turn until you are comfortable with that. Then, progress to a gentle trot. Concentrate on slowly making the "horse" more confident with you rather than concentrating on your own confidence issues.

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How long have you had this horse? What have you done with him? Have you seen him ridden by other people? What type of experience have you had riding other horses?

Caution is a good thing. It keeps us from getting into a lot of bad situations. Take things one step at a time. It sounds like you did this when you put weight in one stirrup. The next step would be to do the same but lean over the saddle. Then, do the same and stroke the horse all over both sides. It would also help to do this from both sides. We traditionally mount from the left side of the horse, but it is good practice to get the horse used to being mounted from both sides. The more you expose a horse to, the more confidence he will gain if you don't push too fast. As you realize your horse is not frightened by your activities, you should gain more confidence to actually straddle him. Then, gently squeeze with your legs and ask for a walk.

Walk, stop, and turn until you are comfortable with that. Then, progress to a gentle trot. Concentrate on slowly making the "horse" more confident

with you rather than concentrating on your own confidence issues.

Ive had darcy for a year a 3 months. Ive rode him 3 times at the place i got him but when i got him to my place he became a pasture horse. He use to be a jumper. And ive seen a lot of people ride him. When i rode him the first time he did great he wasnt very aggressive just really calm. The second i feel off he ducked out one way and i went the other. And the third time went smoothly. The only reason i stopped riding is because the saddle i have is from when i was 10. So i just try work on my own confidence by putting one foot in the stirrup

I have rode aggresseive cutting horses nd fast paced barrel horses. I dont know why im scared of riding my own horse.

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I does seem strange that you are nervous considering your riding experiences and what you have seen of your horse working. Of course emotions often have little to do with reason.

I would recommend progressing at a pace you are comfortable with. But do try to progress.

Are you planning on buying a saddle any time soon? I almost always ride in a saddle, but riding bareback shouldn't be all that much different. The main purpose of stirrups is to helps us mount rather than help us ride. I have had students who prefer riding without stirrups when in a saddle, because the stirrups didn't allow them to have their feet in the correct position.

Do you think your hesitancy is from fear of falling? I teach my students to think of their weight sinking like sand in an hourglass down through their body into their feet. With your weight concentrated in your feet, you are very stable, like one of those inflatable dolls with sand in the bottom; if you push them over, they pop right back up. With such a low center of gravity and one leg on each side of a horse, it is almost impossible to fall off. Of course, remember to keep balanced with one seat bone on either side of the horse's spine. You should also be sure that you are centered longitudinally -- head over shoulders over hips over heals. I see too many people leaning back on their pockets with their legs out in front of them.

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Im saving up the money to get a new saddle. And i kinda am scared of falling off

Having fallen off once, fear of falling is understandable. Years ago, I had three incidents happen in one week that made me reconsider whether I should be riding at all. I could not blame the horse for any of these incidents. They were just accidents. Sometimes things just happen. Thankfully, I kept riding. I have learned so much from the horses I have ridden.

When you do start riding again, concentrate on how you ride. The most important aspects of riding well are balance and freedom of movement. The better your balance -- both laterally and longitudinally -- and the lower your center of gravity, the more stable you are. Your body must be free to move so that you can follow the movements of your horse. Remember, you must be balanced with the horse as well. Try to feel where your horse's center of gravity is and try to position yourself above this. If your horse's center of gravity is too far forward, use half-halts, down transitions, and backing to try to shift his weight more toward the rear. A rider feels much more confident on a well-balanced horse. Try to make all of your movements smoothly so your horse isn't startled.

If you feel nervous, try deep breathing exercises. If a rider takes a deep breath and audibly exhales, you may feel the horse do the same. The tenseness of the rider may have caused tenseness in the horse. As the rider relaxes, the horse generally does as well.

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Can you get someone else to ride him before you do on your first ride or two? I would get someone competent to warm him up and then after someone has 'knocked a little bit of the air out of him' (as we call it), you should feel a lot more comfortable getting on and riding. Since I am old and pretty crippled with arthritis, I frequently have someone warm up a horse for me. Then, I not only know I will not have any surprises I don't want, I also have a horse that is ready to listen and learn so I can work briefly on actual schooling and training. I just cannot ride a 'fresh' horse any more and I absolutely hate longing or round-penning a horse before riding one.

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I've ridden and owned horses for over 35 yrs. I've fallen off, been bucked off and even jumped off a few times. Each time I just got back on and kept going. I think your confidence is within yourself and has nothing to do with this horse intimidating you. If the horse is too big and you don't feel comfortable, I'd consider selling or trading for a smaller, very quiet horse that will give you more confidence. You do need to get control of the horse's feet, a la the clinicians such as Clinton Anderson, who give you the skills to deal with the horse from the ground first and then in the saddle. :twitch:

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I had a very nasty fall a few years back, but got back on. Eventually got a TWH who was the perfect horse for me. Circumstances being as they were, I didn't own a horse for the last eight years. I started with taking riding lessons...I wanted to not only refresh what I knew, but gain knowledge of what I didn't. Lemme tell ya, I forgot a lot of the little things and became knowledgeable in a totally different type of horsemanship that I was not brought up with. After searching months for the right horse for me, I found Jaeger. Guess what-i was scared to no end to ride. I made constant excuses. Jaeger is a kind, gentle soul so I had no reason to even fathom any notion he would intentionally harm me. There is still a fear from my past that held me back. The first time I rode, five minutes into it, my fears took over and I was ready to hop off. So I just sat there for a moment, told myself to buck up and quit forcing my fears to the surface. Lemme tell ya, five seconds after I exhaled that deep pitted breath, so did Jaeger. That was my complete a-ha moment. The ground work, the retraining-all there in that moment. Man, how I missed feeling that connection with a horse. My nervous energy was contagious, my positive energy was the key.

If you have access to a trainer, please consider lessons. It is truly a confidence builder when your trainer tells you " You GOT this." Also, you need to first trust yourself! Gain the ground work. Just like with most everything, the more you do something, the more comfortable you become. I am still working on my confidence, but it gets easier each time.

Just my rambling two cents.... :-)

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Hello Darcysgirl.

Find an competent riding instructor in order to put yourself in the driver's seat or shall we say the saddle.

This kind of individual most times may have a teaching horse one can also be an aid in teaching you trust, having seen all kind of levels of riders.

You will attain bits of confidence over time specially from this learning experiences, then must later on everything can be transfer to and aboard your horse.

I hope this insight helps.

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I have rode aggresseive cutting horses nd fast paced barrel horses. I dont know why im scared of riding my own horse.

That is exactly where I was for the longest time. I could ride everyone elses but not my own. I would stand on the mounting block with one foot in the strup and just cry. I finaly moved to a barn with a couple of horse crazy ladies that were thankfull to get the chance to ride anything and would warm him up for me. That was my trigger, I had to see someone else ride him first. Now 3 years later I can w/t/c trails and arena but every now and again I will spaz and have to have some one come out and ride him. You know what? That's just fine too. Its good for him to be ridden by someone else occasionaly and its good for me to be able to see what he's doing and how he's working.

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