myriamw

Problems With A New Horse

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i brought my new horse home on the 1st of this month (on wednesday), (shes my first at home horse) she seemed very scared and nervous as expected. but on the 2nd (friday) while brushing her she bit me on the shoulder, which the person i got her from swore that the horse (lindy) had never bitten her and she'd owned her for 10 years. then sunday she bucked my step dad off her and monday she bolted while my step dad was walking her. she bit my mom wednesday. shes become very very stuborn and it is very hard to get her to do things. i spent about 2 hours this morning trying to pick her front hooves and she still will not let me pick them up. i spent tons of time with her at the previous owners house and never had a problem getting her to do anything. im not sure if shes just mad that i took her from her previous home or if this kind of sudden change is normal with bringing a horse home? any help would be AMAZING.

thanks for reading and any help

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This is a horse that is showing dominance and a complete and utter lack of respect for you and your family.

John Lyon's has a trick that works when a horse goes to or does bite.

You have 3 seconds to kill it.

That means yelling and hitting that horse as hard as you can, anywhere on the body or neck (head is out of bounds). You want to project RAGE & ANGER so that the horse knows that your going to kill it.

After 3 seconds....relax, breathe slowly in and out. Then act as if nothing happened.

Your horse is going to think "OMG! I did something really bad! That human was going to kill me!"

A horse can kill a human by biting them.

Biting is dangerous and your horse needs to learn that biting a human will cause the human to kill it. For 3 seconds.

When ever I buy a new horse I start them from scratch as if they were a young horse without any training.

The horse will learn respect and what I expect as correct behavior.

That means starting in a round pen and making the horse move at liberty (or a square pen with the corners blocked with poles).

I want the horse to know that I am the boss/lead horse.

That I choose and control the direction & speed that it goes.

We progress through to lunging and other ground work.

The best step by step program to teach your horse (IMO) is Clinton Anderson's. He breaks it down into easy to understand steps that really work. http://www.downunderhorsemanship.com/

If your worried and need help from a trainer. There are trained apprentices that can help you at home. Just check on the website.

Good Luck with your new horse!

Edited to add...Don't ever hand feed this horse!

If you want to treat your horse, find it's favorite itchy spot and scratch it.

Or give it a nice massage.

Food goes into feeders/barrels/pails.

Edited by dondie

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take this horse back!!!!!!! if any thing the horse should be unsure, it should not go straight into dominance mode. at the very least you guys do not click and i doubt you ever will. this has danger written all over it.

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I agree, she doesn't sound like a good match for you. She is just dominating you and your family like she would another horse. If you don't have the experience and skills to correct her, she could hurt one of you badly. Best of luck.

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How experienced are you with horses otherwise?

Is she the only horse on your property?

It does sound like she is testing you and has some dominance issues. This behavior really needs to be nipped in the bud - but part of the problem might be a new environment and being alone. If she doesn't have a herd structure to be part of, she might be trying to figure out her place with you instead. This doesn't excuse it but might be why she's acting so differently than she did in her previous home.

If you are a first time owner I really would suggest keeping her in a boarding situation where there are knowledgable people to help and work with you. When you are all ready to have a horse at home, I would also suggest not keeping her alone. A big change in routine/environment + being alone can cause horses to act really weird or get anxious.

In this case, see if you can bring her back - if the place is not far from you, see if you can work out a situation where you keep her at her old farm but maintain ownership or lease her, while getting more instruction and such.

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First, truly broke and respectful horse does not bolt, buck or bite, regardless of new enviroment

If she is now an only horse, when previously living in a herd situation, that can make her more on edge and nervous, but a horse doe snot pull away when led, nor buck a person off, unless that horse has previously learned to intimidate certain people ( ie, is a 'reformed spoiled horse , and not a horse that was trained correctly from day one )

When at the seller's place, did you ride this horse? With other horses, or out alone? Was the horse ridden down before you got there?

What do you mean that she did 'everything there? Stand tied. Never pinned ears , when handled, groomed or saddled?? Led respectfully beside you, never pulling ahead or lagging behind?

Any chance the horse was drugged? Did you have A ppe exam done, and did you have some blood drawn at that time? When a horse's behavior chances that much, it is wise to have that blood sample from the day of the exam, so that you can have a drug screen run

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Hello.

Horses with training issue will sometimes act out like yours specially if they were purchased and placed into another environment which is new.

On the other hand, there are those ones that has figured out that the leadership is poor therefore in the mind of the horse, it must protect itself.

I would recommend seeking out the assistance from an professional horse trainer one that will listen to your concerns and act on them by alleviating

all of the problems and then teach you how to maintain the correctness where you can go on enjoy this animal because that was the reason why you bought it.

I hope this insight helps.

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" from Donde

John Lyon's has a trick that works when a horse goes to or does bite.

You have 3 seconds to kill it.

That means yelling and hitting that horse as hard as you can, anywhere on the body or neck (head is out of bounds). You want to project RAGE & ANGER so that the horse knows that your going to kill it.

After 3 seconds....relax, breathe slowly in and out. Then act as if nothing happened.

Your horse is going to think "OMG! I did something really bad! That human was going to kill me!"

Read more: http://forums.horsecity.com/index.php?app=forums&module=post&section=post&do=reply_post&f=7&t=47098270#ixzz2HQJmRwrw"

That helped alot! thanks. i got a trainer to come out and work with her, the trainer said that shes trainable. one thing i have noticed that she came from a two horse herd so shes frustrated at being a lone horse now. her and i get along better now that she's growing to trust me. i also found out by my farrier that the bolting issues and the like to run up and down hill was from back pain. i dont let anyone ride her thats not had riding experiance before. ive ridden her with only a bridle a couple of times and she did great, she learns quick when you put time and patients into her.

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I am glad things appear to be going better for you and her. I would caution you, however, not to be tempted to let her get away with bad behavior because of past pain issues. if you have done what you should to be sure she is comfortable you MUST continue to discipline her or someone will get hurt. I am VERY glad to hear you are working with someone, that is always a good step to take.

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Oaky, where ever you are grooming her whe she bites you, is it in the area where the saddle/girth rest? If so, she may be sore there, so going over that area, make sure you do it very gently, and get the vet out to check her out. He/she will tell you what to do if the horse is sore in that area.

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I'm glad that things are improving! Does this mean you've decided on keeping her? I'm not sure if giving her back was really ever an option for not.

Anyway, I think there are wonderful trainers out there who have the goal in mind to not only train your horse but to help YOU as her on-going trainer and partner. I hope this is exactly what you are getting! :) Be careful and keep at it.

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I'm glad things are going better

I'd be dubious of a farrier diagnosing back pain, esp if the horse likes to bolt and run up hill-sounds more like a training issue

Does she dip her back when you run a brush or your hand along the spine? Horses with back back pain will finch and sip their back away from that pressure

In fact, horses that have pain in the wither area, often due to saddle fit, will take mincing steps going downhill-not run

If she truly has apain issue, then experience of the person riding her is not the solution. Saddle fit and ruling out other pain issues are the solution.

Curious-why did your farrrier decide she had back pain?

Horses run up and down hills, because that is their natural instinct to do so, until you teach them to use their back end correctly and balance correctly, carrying a rider, without resorting to running or bounding up a hill

Edited by Smilie

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