Great_Whitey

Treating Aural Hematomas In Dogs?

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Does anyone have a dog who has had aural hematomas? my 2 year old hound cross has one in each ear...no ear infection and I can not find where anything May have stung him but the gnats and flies were bad today and he really does.hate flies.

how did you treat the hematoma? Aural splint orsurgery?Did you leave it alone? How crinkly/disfigured did the ear get? if you did the surgery what was that.like as far as aftercare, healing time, Etc? What kind of $ am I looking at?

I have done a little reading and decided that his ears will not explode if he does.not get the surgery. I am a little worried about risk of infection but I could be being paranoid. It does sound like a pain in the butt. The aural splint sounds better, but I don't know that I am completely understanding it. I do adore.my dog, and love his ears. I don't want to sound like a snob but will his ears be ugly if I go the 'do nothing' route? will I have to worry about other issues.or will the hematomas just dry up?

Thanks in advance for your help and patience!

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Sorry for any.errors, I am doing this on my phone. I also wanted to say that I will be calling his vet tomorrow and talking with him. I will do whatever is best for him, I just wanted to hear some other.opinions and learn more about.options for him =) thanks again!

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My Shepherd-mix dog got a hematoma in one of her ears. When my rural livestock vet saw it, he said to just let it heal on its own. It crinkled her ear badly and it remained stiff and not pliable at all. Aterwards, I felt I had to take special care of that ear to make sure all of the folds were clean and dry to prevent her becoming uncomfortable.

Some years later, one of my cats (Mister) got an aural hematoma and I took him to the vet right away. She slit and drained it, put a few stitches in and it healed w/out problems. BUT ... there was *still* a little bit of crinkling, more like wavy-bumps, that changed the shape of his ear.

A few months later, Mister started to get *another* hematoma at the very tip of his other ear. This happened/was noticed on a Saturday so I planned to wait until Monday since it wasn't worthy of an E-vet visit. But one of the other cats took care of it before I could get him to the vet. A younger kitten was rough-housing with Mister and bit the tip of his ear OFF! Because the bump from the hematoma was forming at the tip, when she grabbed that ear in her mouth and pulled and Mister pulled back, together their actions ripped off the tip.

This happened shortly after the boxing match where Tyson bit off Holyfield's ear, so you KNOW what I nicknamed them! :rotf:

Edited by Heidi n Q

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Max had them when he was a pup. We slit them and let them drain with an antibiotic ointment on them.. They healed fine. When we first took him to the vet, the vet just drained them with a needle...but they would fill up again. We found lancing them worked the best. His ears are fine where we did it, but the vet made a mess out of his one ear when they just drained them.

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Edited by Alaskandraft

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I had a golden ret. some years back. She had one.

My vet said one way to get them is when they shake their head and smack an ear.

My girl had her ear slit and drained. It healed up nicely.

It was a fraction thicker the rest of her life.

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If you are okay with the 'califlower' ear-look...then it will shrivel up and fix itself or you can stick it with sterile syringe and drain it...but I wouldn't advise either.

Both ways is a risk to the dog.

Not to mention that if the ear is not taught to remend by either shriveling up or repair by vet...it will keep happening and it hurts like heck.

The vet needs to fix it.

That is the best permanent way to make it over with.

Usually when people bring Fido in for this surgery, they usually use the opportunity to get a dental done and some moles or lumps removed while the pup is under.

Saves money by being charged one anesthesia and one hospital bill.

Edited by teampenninglady123

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Jacks,

Before you put your dog through surgery and yourself through the expense, consult with your vet about a short-term, low-level course of the anti-inflammatory steroid, Prednisone. I've seen it used to good effect on several dogs, including my own this past spring. None of the dogs has had a recurrence, and all of the ears look good. Pred is not anything I would want my animals on long-term, but for this use, it should be safe -- safer than surgery, for sure.

M.

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AHS - Form Letter - Splint Request.pdf

Hello Jacks and sorry to hear about your ear problem.

You mentioned in your post about the 'Aural Splint', "The aural splint sounds better, but I don't know that I am completely understanding it."

I am Daniel with the 'Aural Splint' and allow me to help you and others understand it.

The aural splint is fairly basic in design, based on medical history and fact.

First prepare the earflap with a base of tape, second aspirate the hematoma, third apply the custom fitted splinting plates to the ear with non-elastic athletic tape, leave for 14 days and remove.

The process of splinting the ear flap, confining the ear flap in a location where the hematoma cannot fill but slightly will cause back pressure against the broken blood vessel and promote coagulation of the blood vessel leak as well as allow the ear tissues to re-grow connective elements while in the natural position thus avoiding the shriveling of the ear flap.

I am looking forward to helping you save money, and you helping me perform a case study on my treatment.

To become a case study participant and get the free treatment plates cut to your animal's specifications, you need to email me a request at auralsplint@yahoo.com. You may use the attached form letter for faster response.

Sincerely,

Daniel Whitton

Auralsplint.org

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Thank you all so much for your input...I thought about calling one of our large animal vets out to pull a Coggins and then "oh by the way could you.lance these open?" Lol. I doubt I would have been able to! So I brought him to the vets and when the front desk, 2 vet techs, and his vet LOOKED at the ear they said oh yeah textbook aural hematoma....but when Dr Long FELT the ears he said they weren't like any other hematomas he had ever dealt with. We started.him on prednisone(much to my relief) and he said call me in 2 days and we'll see what needs to be done. 1 day of pred and his ears were normal!! I was so happy and grateful, especially after reading the replies here. I don't do well with a lot of blood and when I started reading up on aural hematomas I started getting nightmares and was quite nauseous on a regular basis until I heard prednisone lol. Once again, gracias HC!

Also,Thank you for the information on the aural splint, Mr. Whitten!

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