equicrzy

No More Training For Abby....per The Vet.

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This could go in Horse Health, I suppose, but, it's a follow up of Abby's training.

The Vet says, Abby's injury is probably a kick, but, it isn't what is causing the lameness, it's her old shoulder injury, it can't stand up to training/riding.

The trainer trained/rode her for two months and, we thought all was well, because she showed no signs of being lame.....until a couple weeks ago...it couldn't stand up to the rigors of training, or, riding and gave out.

She's in her pasture, the vet said there's no need to pen her up, she says just to let her be a horse and do what she's gonna do, the limp will eventually disappear, again, like before, but, the vet says she will probably never be a riding horse.

The vet then, pointed to HER two horses in the pasture and said, " I feed mine , I have no time to ride them, but, they're pretty to look at". At least she CAN ride hers!

We were told by the first Vet Abby saw, that there would be no way to tell if she could be ridden, unless we just went ahead and tried and see what happens....now we know.

She at least has had the ground work done and her manners are much better. I can probably, at some point, get on her bareback and just tool around in the smaller corral, just walking.

You know, I don't mind having a big, black pasture pet just this morning I looked out my bedroom window and saw her standing there, looking pretty and.......I smiled.

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i'm sorry to hear that equi. but don't forget there's PLENTY of stuff you can do on the ground with her that can be fun and interestting for you both!

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That's her job....to make you smile! Bless you both!

Thanks Belle, this horse has always had a way about her, I swear, she's more human, than horse!

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i'm sorry to hear that equi. but don't forget there's PLENTY of stuff you can do on the ground with her that can be fun and interestting for you both!

Thanks Nick, I'm already planning on taking her out for walks in the neighborhood and, I'm sure I can come up with more.

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check out books written by the pignon brothers and dr. natalie penquitt. the pignon brothers are french and penquitt is german, but i'm pretty sure there are english versions.

could you drive her? if i'm not mistakenshe's a fresian, and fresians were originally bred in northern germany to pull.

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check out books written by the pignon brothers and dr. natalie penquitt. the pignon brothers are french and penquitt is german, but i'm pretty sure there are english versions.

could you drive her? if i'm not mistakenshe's a fresian, and fresians were originally bred in northern germany to pull.

I'll look up those authors, thanks.

Yeah, she's a Friesian and I have thought about teaching her to drive...haha that sounds funny, teach her to drive...she would make a great carriage horse, she has beautiful movement, even with the limp...which I hope will be less noticable over time.

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get her started on her learner's permit :D, turn on the haunches, getting used to things draped all over her body, drag a tire, all subject to vet approval of course. could be fun! driving IS fun!

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get her started on her learner's permit :D, turn on the haunches, getting used to things draped all over her body, drag a tire, all subject to vet approval of course. could be fun! driving IS fun!

She isn't gonna want to borrow the truck and trailer and take her friends out, is she?

All that other stuff, she has already gone through...except, maybe the tire dragging, I don't know if dragging things was part of her training. I'll have to ask the trainer,

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check out books written by the pignon brothers and dr. natalie penquitt. the pignon brothers are french and penquitt is german, but i'm pretty sure there are english versions.

could you drive her? if i'm not mistakenshe's a fresian, and fresians were originally bred in northern germany to pull.

Just looked up these two names. I found several articles/websites and training devices for sale by the Pignon brothers, everything on Dr Natalie Penquitt is in German...so far, anyway.

I spent almost 4 years in Germany in the 80's, I should have taken a German class. My German consists of, ordering in a restaurant, telling my neighbor, " I'm sorry my kinder are picking your bloomin" and telling a guy in a gasthaus, who was hitting on me, I wasn't interested.

When my landlords came over, they brought an English/German dictionary.

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Sorry to hear that Abby won't be a riding horse, but glad to know that you will still find ways to enjoy her and work with her. And the view out your window of your beautiful horse can't be beat!

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She isn't gonna want to borrow the truck and trailer and take her friends out, is she?

All that other stuff, she has already gone through...except, maybe the tire dragging, I don't know if dragging things was part of her training. I'll have to ask the trainer,

could be fun but ask the vet. driving is VERY fun :smile: . not your current trainer unless he also drives.

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Sorry to hear that Abby will not be a riidng horse, but I'm sure she will enjoy just being an equine friend in whatever capacity you can use her in

My gelding Einstein is no longer sound, due to the years that farriers allowed his heels to become under run and toes long-years before I learned of Pete Ramey ans others. AT one time, I thought he would be completely re habilitaed, after I pulled his shoes and started trimming him according to the barefoot movement

He came a long ways-from the point where I thought I had to put him down, to the point where he is a happy pasture ornament

This is a horse who my two sons would tease me as being my third and favorite son!

Besides the many show awards and countless trial miles, he is the horse that helped me through the year of breast cancer

I now have resigned myself to the fact that we will never again lope acorss the snowy fierlds, doing perfect flying changes, but he gives my grandson the odd ride, and is there every morning to greet me with a whinny. I can still breathe into his nostrils, and enjoy running my hands over him!

Good luck with Abby-maybe driving will work out for her!

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What was "the old shoulder injury"? A Sweeney shoulder? Two years ago my 14 YO mare managed to somehow tear the superscapular nerve in her left shoulder, possibly in a fight or collision with another horse and went dead lame. Three different vets recommended immediate euthanasia but I declined, choosing to give her some time. Here's how bad she was:

It took 22 months of pasture rest but here she is now: (Watch full screen. Video shot from a distance.)

She was fully trained long before the injury. We just started back on short trail rides at a walk only. She can go about 1 hour before she starts dragging her left toe. I plan on adding 10-15 minutes each ride if she can handle it. Some days I can detect a slight limp and we don't ride.

Don't give up on your Fresian. Advanced training and speed work may be out of the question but you may still have a trail horse in there somewhere if she is brought along slowly. Teaching her to drive is an excellent idea too. I thought about that with mine but I don't like the view. The world looks so much better from a saddle. ~FH

Edited by FloridaHorseman

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Would she carry a person or a child at a walk? Like Hippotherepy maybe? Could be a good outlet for you both.

Hi! As for being a therapy horse, I don't think so, before her injury she only had 2 months under saddle, so, I'm going to say, she is not far enough along in her training to do that......and she is still a little on the high energy side, injury or not.

I do think, in time, she could handle a small adult/child on short rides.

Edited by equicrzy

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What was "the old shoulder injury"? A Sweeney shoulder? Two years ago my 14 YO mare managed to somehow tear the superscapular nerve in her left shoulder, possibly in a fight or collision with another horse and went dead lame. Three different vets recommended immediate euthanasia but I declined, choosing to give her some time. Here's how bad she was:

It took 22 months of pasture rest but here she is now: (Watch full screen. Video shot from a distance.)

She was fully trained long before the injury. We just started back on short trail rides at a walk only. She can go about 1 hour before she starts dragging her left toe. I plan on adding 10-15 minutes each ride if she can handle it. Some days I can detect a slight limp and we don't ride.

Don't give up on your Fresian. Advanced training and speed work may be out of the question but you may still have a trail horse in there somewhere if she is brought along slowly. Teaching her to drive is an excellent idea too. I thought about that with mine but I don't like the view. The world looks so much better from a saddle. ~FH

That first video was hard to watch...Abby was never that bad, she was almost full weight bearing by the second week and is now just walking with a slight head bob...unless she gets wound up and tears across the pasture, which she CAN do, she just pays for it later. ( X rays show a bone cyst).

Her old injury was a shoulder fracture, sustained as a weanling, at the breeding farm. She's healed from that, but I guess the stress of training and riding is too much for her, we were told, by the vet, that even he didn't know if she would be sound enough to ride, we would just have to do it and see.

She's on rest right now, vet said there's no need to pen her up, just let her out to be a horse and to do what she's going to do...on her own.

I think it's like you said, after some time, she will be able to be lightly ridden......I'll take it.

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There is one thing Id consider also before I gave up completely and that is scar tissue and PT. I mean this was a fracture, not just a sprain. I would think about looking at her injury in a physical therapy kind of light. I mean you have tried her for 2 months and she only came up lame just now. How far had she gotten? What was she doing? Im sure she was still building strength and flexibility and learning to carry weight. All these things matter.

I would stretch this horse and teach her to do alot of ground maneuvering and lateral exercises to see if you can limber her up, build more strength and work through some of this. I look at this like a human going through PT when all the animal has done is sit around and be a pasture horse till just now. I wouldn't throw in the towel myself just yet because she came down lame after being ridden for two months. Slow and steady and stretch and limber along with strength. Id bet she can be a light pleasure horse in time and with some maintenance, massage etc, maybe even more. Def try the buggy but you may beed to experiment with harnesses collar vs breastpull, widths padding etc.. Sometimes they aggravate shoulder issues.

JMO

Edited by Trinity

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There is one thing Id consider also before I gave up completely and that is scar tissue and PT. I mean this was a fracture, not just a sprain. I would think about looking at her injury in a physical therapy kind of light. I mean you have tried her for 2 months and she only came up lame just now. How far had she gotten? What was she doing? Im sure she was still building strength and flexibility and learning to carry weight. All these things matter.

I would stretch this horse and teach her to do alot of ground maneuvering and lateral exercises to see if you can limber her up, build more strength and work through some of this. I look at this like a human going through PT when all the animal has done is sit around and be a pasture horse till just now. I wouldn't throw in the towel myself just yet because she came down lame after being ridden for two months. Slow and steady and stretch and limber along with strength. Id bet she can be a light pleasure horse in time and with some maintenance, massage etc, maybe even more. Def try the buggy but you may beed to experiment with harnesses collar vs breastpull, widths padding etc.. Sometimes they aggravate shoulder issues.

JMO

I think you make a lot of very good points. Thank you, I'll try the stretching and I will for sure go slow and easy with her.

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