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WalkTrotCanter

Considering Breeding This Lady..& Laminitis Q's

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This is Nico, a 15-17 year old 10-11 hand pony. She is not registered but her personality is AMAZING! She is one of a kind, gentle as can be. In my limited experience I feel that she has ideal confirmation and attitude. This pony has never kicked, bitten, or reared. Asside from laminitic episodes she is sound with sturdy sure footed hooves. She does have a cateract in one eye but it does not effect her, im not sure if this can be a genetic problem? Ive had her since she was 5 years old. She was green broke to ride and drive. Her teeth are perfect. Without training, simply through trust over the years weve had her she will do anything I ask, walk under and over tarps, sheets and blankets on the clothes line, streams, puddles, jumps, clips, bathes, stand on cross ties for hours without moving a muscle, amazing for dentist, farrier, vet, deworming. Gentle with children and other animals. Not a mean bone in her body.

With all this said, over the years we've debated breeding her. The only reason we havent is due to having too many riding horses (not enough time for a baby) and we've worried about pregnancy and birth affecting her laminitis...

First off, could those of you with experience breeding laminitic horses/ponies weigh in on this?? Is it safe? Are there healthy ways to breed laminitic horses? Does it increase laminitic episodes or death? Are there way we can ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery for both mom and baby through a special diet and fitness? Is it just a bad idea all together? Any experience/tips/sites would be helpful.

Secondly, thinking about the ponies confirmation, attitude & temperment, would she be a suitable candidate?

I am aware of the current flow of unwanted foals in the world but this baby would not be bred with the idea of resale. This would be a personal pet and life long commitment. If we decide to breed, we will want to breed within the next 2 years before her age becomes more of a risk.

Although she is not registered I do believe our pony was well bred for confirmation, personality and A+ temperment. We would look for the same in the stud.

Thoughts?

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First and foremost you need to identify why she developed laminitis in the first place and make sure that condition is under control. Has she been radiographed for rotation?

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Shes been completely sound for the past 2 years...her initial bout into founder was when a horse sitter watch our horses for 2 weeks and thought it would be a good idea to give all the horses bunches of apples at dinner, we returned to a pony who was in immense pain...very scary since we had never delt with anything like that before. There has been mention of her being IR but we just watch her diet, cut out the high sugars, pen her in a dirt pen with an hour turn out on grass with a muzzle. In the fall and spring she isnt allowed grass at all and in the winter she is fed mostly good quality hays and a handful of IR/laminitic equine safe grain. If we notice any heat or slight pain we soak the hay...however this winter we arent having to soak the hay, im assuming this batch of hay is tolerable for her since we started with the old stuff and let the knew stuff sit for a couple of months before starting in. So its the typical high sugar laminitis x with a possible insilin resistance which seems to be managed based on diet. We have not had an xray in 8 years as she hasnt been in enough pain for long periods to call for one. When she did have the xray I dont remember the outcome well, but I believe there was slight rotation but it was hardly noticable, she wore foam pads for a couple of months. Before the past 2 years of soundness she would get minor laminitic spells that would last maybe 2 weeks, we would alter the diet, soak the hay and she would come out of it. There appears to be no long term problems based on her outside appearance and soundness, however I dont know whats going on in the hoof. Last thing id ever want to do is harm her, so Id love to know more about laminitis, pregnancy and foaling. If there is a great risk of furthering her lamitis id rather not go down that road but if its a minor risk or easily managed than I feel it may be worth it.

Edited by WalkTrotCanter

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