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nightdreamer

Birthing Show Calves

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My husband has been involved in the show cattle world for years now.

Slowly building the herd while in college, buying a few show heifers each years. He's also been AI-ing all of his own cows and a few of his dads and buying cows for donor cows to put some embryos in.

If your familar it takes several use to build up a herd of cows that are actually suitable to have the show calves. Unless you've got a lot of money...which we don't.

Well this is the first years we are having some babies that are worth putting into a show calf sale.

The show heifer just had her baby tonight, almost a week and 1/2 Past due!!! We've been very nervously! We were just hoping that it would be alive at this point!

I couldn't be there when they pulled it but they def. had to pull it and it weighed about 90 lbs!! Much bigger than they wanted. And of course he is a boy.

We actually AI ed her to an angus with a small BW. Which is what you want for the first calf.

So nerve wracking!!! And this was just the first one.

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When I first read this I was thinking to myself "I've never heard of the show Cattle World." :lol:

What an experience! Congrats on the new calf :) What's his name? And where's his glamor shot?

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I'm waiting to get a few more pics f/ the husband. He's soooo cute has similar head marking like his mama! I love the ones with some color!

He's still a big sluggish but looking like he will pull through. Mama is wants her baby and is trying to get through the fence to get him...which is a very good thing. She's not mean by any means just wants her baby.

Ha we call it the show cattle world b/c it is a bit different than just raising cattle! Which he does also but these babies are so much more nervre wracking b/c they can be so dang big!

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Its not uncommon for a cow to hold up to 3 wks past her due date, or calve 2-3 wks early. You might get him some Jump Start, (probiotic gel with electrolites and vits in it) alot of sluggish calves need a bit of help in that area. Keep an eye on your heifer as she's had a large calf, it takes more time to recover from a large calf than a small one, watch her discharge color and smell. We built our herd up the same way, it just takes time, unfortunetly we had the dwarf gene in a champion bull we breed too a few years ago that was not know about at the time of breeding. We had to cull out all but our original 4 cows, all our first calf heifers and their calves tested positive for the gene. So we are in the process of slowly rebuilding the herd. We need pictures though!

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O yes, well aware. We were hoping early b/c we were hoping for a smaller heifer calf. And she was huge and ready to go about week ago. We were expecting a big boy! And that is what me get!

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I've got a heifer right now thats as big as a house and still has 6 wks to go. Im interested to see if the group will calve the same way they have the past 3 years. We've added 2 this past year so we'll se where they fit in, but the others have calved in the exact same order and on the exact same date for the last 3 years running.

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So with show calves you don't let them stay with mom any?

What breed are you raising?

Did you cut back on the protein in the last 90 days of pregnancy?

I used to work for a Brangus breeder who did AI and embryo transfers. They had crepe feeders for the pregnant heifers that was loaded with protein. Probably 50% of his first year birthing heifers either lost calves due to hard births or were pulled because of high birth weights.

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Do you raise Angus? Do you show them yourselves, or sell club calves?

We don't show our Dexters because our local fair isn't familiar with them and the nearest show is pretty far away. They are in county fairs in many states, like Missouri and North Carolina, but not here in Florida. I train the babies to halter and lead and prepare the heifers to be family milk cows. Some of the calves I've sold have been shown, but you are right. It takes a lot of money to have show cattle. The people around here that sell club calves to FFA and 4H make some money. When their calves win, they can ask for more money for the next calves.

Edited by Little Cow

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I really miss showing club calves and steers.. :(

But only a couple more years until my kids can! :)

Impatiently waiting to start calving in 2weeks or less!!!! Call me crazy, but i think calves are way cuter when their 0-2 months old.

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Probably 50% of his first year birthing heifers either lost calves due to hard births or were pulled because of high birth weights.

Thats horrible. Was he pelvic measuring the heifers to see if thats where the issue was stemming from? Because using heifer bulls should greatly help that number. Or even bulls with lower to mid birthweight epds that are clean and well shaped in their shoulders will make calving the same weight of a calf easier than a course shouldered big headed one.

I cant imagine losing more than 1-2% thru the whole herd at calving time. Some years are rough, but even then maybe 3-4%... 50% is insane. I grew up almost strictly registered angus(hand full of herefords and the club calves).. So it may be different with brangus, as im not very familiar with bramahs, but it cant be that much different one would think. Hmm.

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Grrr on my phone.. Went back to reread.. I see the creep feeder part. There is no need for creep in a herd with good genetics, maternal cows, and good feed.

My bad. I should read better. Lol.

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I really miss showing club calves and steers.. :(

But only a couple more years until my kids can! :)

Impatiently waiting to start calving in 2weeks or less!!!! Call me crazy, but i think calves are way cuter when their 0-2 months old.

Totally agree! Both my girls have a few years left before they can show as well but its alot of fun watching the calves we've sold being shown and cleaning up in the fairs. We had a heifer go Grand Champion last year and we were so proud just to be watching. This year several steers are going to the local fair so we'll see what they do.

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Calving is soo much fun. Years ago my parents used to show Simmental all over north america and dad did AI for the herd and other ranches. We now have Angus. The bigger the calf the dopeyer it is. Lol. Just give them time they come around. We always refer to those as the big dumb bull calves ha ha. Once they have a buddy running around with(usually a trouble making heifer calf) they soon find their play energy.

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well..............we dont raise angus but raise breed and show holsteins cattle,,, got bit by the "showbug"...started by buying the seed herd and then bred them to calve in at certain timesof the year forthe class they were to be shown in...alot of stress and fun... got in to the em/transplant/frozen eggs...end results were amazing...nice to see a home bred go all american and win a state championship or a national championship.................but we were committed,they were washed clipped, lead, fed before our day ended everyday for years...........Do i still do it no not on that level kids are grown...but looking back i wouldn't trade it for nothing and wouldnt change a thing

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Just a questions out of curiosity, since I know zilch about cattle.

I know you want a low birth weight - but are there any benefits from having a higher birth weight baby, assuming mom and baby are fine? Any edge on the competition by having a larger show calf? Or are they all pretty much the same size by the time they are shown, regardless of birth weight?

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serah- nope. none proven anyway.. there are some people that believe that gigantic calves at birth will be bigger at weaning/yearling time.. plus, the as someone above said (too lazy to scroll up) the bigger the calf, the stupider they are.. 100# calves are like dummy foals are. big and really stupid, so much so that they often need alittle extra help.. where as the 70-80#ers are off and running shortly after birth with no issues.

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SOO sad. The calf didn't make it :(. He was just too big and "dumb", probably some brain damage when they had to pull him, tongue/head too swollen and couldn't suck. Poor think couldn't even stand.

We tried everything, lifting him up, giving him some b12 and a few other shoots the vet recommended, tubed him (which I really don't like doing to many ways to do it wrong). Nothing worked.

He was over 90 lbs!! Which is HUGE for a calf, we would have liked to have a 70 lb. little girl calf but some things just don't work out.

Poor mama, she was such a good mom, cleaned him, tried to get him to stand, and protective.

Feel so bad for my husband he is the one who AI-ed her and picked the bull out. Actually the bull was highly recommended from a big breeder, he breeds a lot of heifers to him and has had low BW and never had to pull any of them. Just a fluke deal that this calf was sooo big.

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