fieldstonefarm1

Need Help, I'm Stumped.

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The long and short of it.

My 10yr old pony came down with a sever case of limes and at the same time was diagnosed with mild cushings. He's been on doxi, and pergolide. So now two months later he is still walking very hoof sore. No rotation, No heat, no pulse, no sensitivity to hoof testers. He walks very heel to toe. He is being treated for thrush. Bute does not help at all. Any thoughts on what else it can be? Could the limes cause other hoof issues? I have padded his feet and it makes no difference. Yes, still being watched by vet. Any thoughts or suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

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I found this article http://www.netpets.o...thspa/lyme.html

Where it says in part:

A side effect of treatment in a small number of animals with Lyme disease is a reaction to toxins released by Borrelia burgdorferi that are killed during the first few days of treatment. This can result in worsening symptoms for a day or two, and in the horse this reaction may precipitate laminitis. It is therefore important to monitor the horse for signs of laminitis (reluctance to move, "walking on eggshells" gait, increased warmth in hooves) during the first week of treatment. The veterinarian should be contacted immediately if laminitis is suspected, so preventive treatment may be initiated.

That statement seems to infer dealing with laminitis at the onset BUT, considering your pony has a double whammy, in dealing with cushings, still displaying a reaction to toxins might be possible. The pony's immune system is in the tank and the thrush supports that to some degree.

I am not familiar with diets for recovering Lymes horses, or if it even resembles the diet for cushings or other metabolic horses.

This is a unique situation that is going to require thinking way outside the box, not only for diet but for hoof care. The pads are a great idea but they may not be helping because the material might be wrong; maybe experiment with different types and thicknesses of material the pony won't crush through in 15 minutes.

Good luck to you - it sounds like the formula for this one is not going to be easy:(

Edited by gaitinalong

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My understanding of Lyme disease is that it affects muscles and joints. Are you sure the soreness is in his feet and not coming from farther up the leg?

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How bad is his thrush? We have a horse at my barn with such bad thrush, that hes walking the same way. Vet was out and did x-rays and said it was thrush. Treatment is we are injecting penicillan into his feet. Within the first few treatments hes walking better already.

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Jet, it's not to bad.

My farrier is coming out this morning. He was down most of the afternoon yesterday.

We put the worst hoof in ice water last night and early this am. Just waiting now for farrier.

Hopefully we'll come p with a solution to give him some comfort. I will update later.

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Well, I had the vet and 2 farriers tending to him this morning. X rays showed a slight rotation. So the farrier took the toe back and lowered the heel. We are taking the toe back further in 2 weeks. My farrier is coming back later to take impressions to make lily pads for him that I can put on and off depending on the ground conditions. He'll get 1 gr of bute am and pm for the next 3 days, then 1/2 gr am and pm for 3 days, then 1/2 gr once a day for 5 days and hopefully he'll be much better by then. I'll update in a couple days with progress.

Thanks for all your input!

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Glad you are getting expert help

Far as walking with heel first landing-that is what you want, as long as the entire stride is normal, Usually horses with thrush will not land heel first, protecting that back of the foot

On the other hand, laminitic horses will walk in an 'egg shell' manner, trying to keep pressure off of that painful front wall. They thus rock back and land very obviously heel first, as your horse is doing, with a stilted gait.

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Laminitis is a symptom of Lime disease and its also a symptom of IR/Cushings. It's like a double whammy and both need to be monitored. It looks like you are doing the right moves. Horses on pergolide or prescend need to be monitored and the ACTH test done a couple of times a year to keep tabs on it and the dosage should be changed accordingly. The dosage is what works for the horse at the time.

The other weak spot is possibly the diet. There is definitely a call to get it tightened right down to specifics, adequate and most importantly....balanced nutrition.

I suggest that you join here

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/

and click on the files section and do some quality reading on the matter. There are horses just like this that are meeting success. There are also other things out there that can help these symptoms. You can post your horse's history, including blood tests and get excellent one on one medical advice on all these things. You really would do well to be here.

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Well, the pony is somewhat better. The farrier is coming later in the week to take the heels down a bit more and shortening the toe as well. He has a nibble net now. Thanks for all the info. Lots of reading to do.

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