Sign in to follow this  
Ivory Annie

Bosals

Recommended Posts

Oh I don't ride with something under it, I was lunging him and starting to get him back into shape.

It's a rope halter that is attached to the lunge line.

Also trying to see where his mind is and if he remembers the basics on the ground. Of course he did!

Will be able to ride ( cleared by dr's of course ) in 2 weeks from tomorrow!

I love a happy horse, especially one that works willingly and happily.

Yes Green he's a cutie!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OKay, was wondering, as that rope halter appears to have a heel knot that could interfer with the way the bosal can act

Since a rope halter and bosal have similar action, guess I never lunge a horse with a bosal. If I am still lunging off of the halter, but want to start bitting the horse up some, I use a snaffle

Good luck on starting to ride again, and hope it goes well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bosal is a training tool. Traditionally, in the Spanish vaquero type training of a bridle horse, the youngster was started either in a snaffle bit (teaching direct reining and following their nose and lateral flexion) or a bosal....both are pretty kind to the mouth if the snaffle is correctly used. Those started in a snaffle were then put into a bosal which teaches more vertical flexion (it hangs more comfortably for the horse if the horse has his head nearly vertical) and neck reining is taught as well....the weight of the bosal and the mecate and the roughness of the mecate were signals that the horse learned to rein from so that pressure on the mouth was minimal if any. Once the horse was doing well in the bosal it was progressed to a finer and finer bosal and then to the "two rein". The Two Rein is a bosal plus the curb/spade bit that is the sign of a fully trained bridle horse. In this set up the bosal/mecate are used first to cue the horse and then followed immediately with the reins of the spade bit...gradually shifting from the bosal as primary cue to the reins of the spade as the primary cue. The horses are also cued throughout by weight and leg cues to the point that the cues from either the bosal or the bit are eventually almost invisible and secondary. Finally the horse has a bosalita (fine, narrow bosal) along with the bridle as the last step before becoming fully "in the bridle". The horse learns in this progression to carry himself in a frame due to the weight and comfort of the bosal and then the spade bit and how they hang on his face/in his mouth. The reins for the spade bit are usually heavy, made of intricately braided rawhide and that weight is enough to cue the horse....the bit hardly ever even moves in his mouth but hangs in a position that reminds him to keep himself framed up. The process of going from snaffle to bosal to two rein to spade usually takes roughly 5 years of near full time work....which is why you seldom see a fully trained bridle horse any more. They are so sensitive and tuned in that they nearly read your mind from your weight and other subtle cues (turn your head to watch a cow and the horse turns from just the shift of seat and slight change of leg pressure for instance that is NORMAL movement for the rider...not even a concious "cue")....a superb riding experience and one you won't forget if you get the chance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks foe the great detail in training the Bridle horse, according to old Vaquero tradition. That process is kept alive to some extent, by the discipline of working cowhorse, today

Shiela Verian has an excellent article on the subject, using the traditional Vaquero method, with some increased amount of softness. If you read Ed Cornnels book on hackamore horsemanship, I can see where some of those old methods concentrated a great deal more on reins and hands than legs, as we use today

Here is the article by Sheila Verian, one of the most successful working cowhorse trainers today, based on those old Vaquero traditions

Outside of the working cowhorse industry, the hackamore (bosal ) is uses as an alternative to a snaffle, when showing a jr horse in a snaffle/hackamore class

If you read the article, you will see where the old Spanish tradition of producing a bridle (spade) horse, used some harsh techniques, that Shiela has eliminated training the well bred cowhorses today, while still folllowing the principles of that tradition

But, if reference to this post, that use of the bosal is not part of the training program, as very few people ride with a spade bit, nor should they

The bosal for most here, is an alternative tool for the snaffle bit, often used interchangeability, esp when showing a two year old western pl horse

http://www.horsechan...-way-17722.aspx

Edited by Smilie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that most (not all) riders do not need to used a spade bit until they have experience and a good "feel" going for them. But the rider who is capable to ride in a spade bit should without hesitation ride their horse (when the horse is ready) in the two rein and then straight up in the bridle. A horse and rider who reach this point and are working together is nothing short of art, and the spade when used correctly is the most sensitive and gentle way of riding. Thats just my opinion though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I was able to ride for a few mins today ( can't do too much at the moment , recovering from a section ) but just from the 5 mins today, going to a snaffle to re-fresh his basics..since it's been months since I rode!

Then go back over to the bosal!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that most (not all) riders do not need to used a spade bit until they have experience and a good "feel" going for them. But the rider who is capable to ride in a spade bit should without hesitation ride their horse (when the horse is ready) in the two rein and then straight up in the bridle. A horse and rider who reach this point and are working together is nothing short of art, and the spade when used correctly is the most sensitive and gentle way of riding. Thats just my opinion though.

I agree that there is an art to having a Spade bit horse. Many of my friends are involved in working cowhorse , where the old vaqerro tradition (with actual improvement, far as using a softer technique to develope that Spade horse, then in days gone by), but my point being, outside of the cowhorse tradition , the use of the bosal is not limited, or even used to develope a Spade bit horse

Most of the Posters here,are not aiming at showing a horse at the NRHC level, where the horse advances to being shown in a Spade, half breed or Mona Lisa, but rather using the bosal as an alternative to using a snaffle, when showing a horse under age 6, western

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree

I have ridden both reiners and nice all around horses, and have never used a spade bit.

Spade bits are not traditional for events like western riding, etc, yet one can execute a series of smooth flying lead changes, on the straight, on a loose rein, off of seat and legs alone, without that horse changing speed , topline or cadence. That's a good handle to me!

Not taking anything away from the Vaquero tradition, but from all I have read, they were ridden much more off of hands than a top western horse is today

Certainly, those Spade horses were not ridden on a total loose rein, off of mainly seat and legs alone

I very much doubt that the bridle could have been dropped on those horses, yet the horse still performed a reining pattern or any other event he excelled at.

While tradition is great< I also think we at times get too hung up on tradition, and fail to see how maybe modern techniques have actually improved many aspects of training. I like to think we put way much more body control on our horses today, then in by gone days

One only needs to look at old reining stops and compare those to the soft stops we have on reiners today. Similar examples exist in all disciplines at upper level

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this