Anerio Deorma

Want To Know More About Horses, Mini Horses Specifically

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So I've wanted a horse for some time, and I've settled on purchasing a mini horse at some point, so that I can have a horse without the need for exponential amounts of land, and stables, and the other special ameneties (<- I hope that is spelled right) that a full size horse would need to survive and be happy, I do not intend to take it to any shows or do any type of competitions. I am simply looking for a companion animal (Because as an aspiring game designer, I won't have the time that is required to be dedicated to my horse if it were a full size breed) The catch howerver, is that I know hardly anything about horses aside from what I read in the off-hand during a random google search regarding the topic sparked by a random spike of interest.

I would appreciate someone directing me to the things minis need to be happy healthy animals in a household-type environment, also what sort of medical care they need. I have read that they require as much if not more medical care than a full size horse, and that their metabolism is very very fast which could lead to weight problems (on that note, how would I know if a horse is having a dietary problem?)

There is no real rush on this, as I do not intend on buying for quite awhile, I want to have a sufficient amount of education on the topic of equine care before I make any sort of decision.

ADDENDUM: please understand that when I say household-type environment, I do NOT mean keeping the poor thing in the house all day. Maybe some sort of netted-in back porch connected to a dog-run type deal in a large yard. Keeping any sort of horse in the house would be dumb.

Edited by Anerio Deorma

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i googled you. do you intend to keep your mini for personal consumption purposes? then you'd be better off contacting a feed lot operator.

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Hmmm - Washington state, London UK...a brony board?...interesting...

Edited by rattusrat

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So, I'm gonna go out on a limb and recommend that you get yourself a hamster. Stay away from horses (even those of a miniscule size).

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Minis require the same amount of attention that big horses do just on a smaller scale. You need to get a dog if you want to keep it on your back porch not a horse. Horses are not to be treated like a house pet.

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:twitch:

As Rosy said, minis still require the same type and amount of attention as their bigger relatives. A dog seems more suited to your specifications, not to mention, horses are herd animals who need the companionship of other horses to remain healthy and sane.

Edited by Smokum

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^^^^Big Ditto!!! Please get a companion animal better suited to be in the home, like a dog or cat.

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Anyone who intends to keep a horse in a dog run off the back porch...well...maybe you should start with something a little less dependent on you, like a stuffed animal perhaps.

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If you want the companionship of a horse and want to further your knowledge of equine behavior and requirements.

I would suggest that you donate your time at a horse rescue. You can learn all about horses and help the world to be a better place at the same time.

Until your games are providing you with a lifestyle that will provide you with acreage enough for a horse (mini or regular size) or allow you to board it/them at a good barn or ranch. Volunteering will give you the knowledge and training to keep your future horses happy and healthy.

Miniature horses have health and feeding issues that require a knowledgeable owner. They also require a large tract of land. I live in a rural area and a person needs a minimum of an acre of land if they wish to have livestock on their property.

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I go through the trouble of making an account on this forum and get only about two posts that actually inform me about anything. The rest is all judgemental asshattery. You people should be ashamed of yourselves for Instantaneously going out of your way to simply deem me completely unworthy of the ownership of a horse. Yes, I understand that horse ownership isn't the lot of a wannabe game designer from the UK living in the US but wanting to know more shouldn't warrant me the scoffing and the annoying judgement.

TL;DR?

If you have nothing helpful to say, if you have nothing decent to say, if you had to go out of your way to develop a counterattack for why im a bad person or whatever your reasoning, GET OUT OF THIS THREAD.

ADDENDUM: Yes I'm a brony. I love My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic. I suffer from paranoia (You know before the flood of "You must be mentally disabled" posts come in) If you have a problem with that for WHATEVER reason, get out of the thread with the rest of the unhelpful people. I see no reason that someone who watches a show outside of the target demographic (Even though the 3rd season was nearly all fanservice) should be shoved aside of the legitimate ownership of a REAL LIFE horse.

SECONDARY ADDENDUM: Thank you Dondie and Smokum for providing some real and helpful information.

See Also (I need to stop editing this post >.>): Dondie brought up a good point, I do not intend on owning a mini for a very. long. time. we are speaking in terms of years, not untill I am able to do one of two things: Stay afloat on the royalties and payment I will be making off of independant and company projects, or retire completely. ****, I'm not even out of high school yet let alone done any sort of higher education. I'm attempting to acquire an enhanced understanding of how this sort of thing works. I understand that a horse is a huge investment of money time and land, and I am not as dumb as a few of you must take me for.

Now I propose the question again: How would I go about learning more about horses, specifically mini horses.

Edited by Anerio Deorma

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spend some time with them and a knowledgeable owner (who has them in a situation with adequate accomodations=space).

you're not even out of high school yet? royalties and payments from what? i ask because horses (mini or otherwise) come with plenty of expenses--purchase price being the least of them.

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On this board, there is no butterfly farts and rainbow unicorns. If we see a problem, we will address it.

Problem; Maybe some sort of netted-in back porch connected to a dog-run type deal in a large yard.

Solution; Minis require the same amount of attention that big horses do just on a smaller scale. You need to get a dog if you want to keep it on your back porch not a horse. Horses are not to be treated like a house pet.

horses are herd animals who need the companionship of other horses to remain healthy and sane.

Etc.

You set yourself up for that, dear. It's obvious if you ever plan on owning a horse of any size, with those accommodations, you shouldn't own a horse. No matter how many years down the road. Horses are not dogs. They are not pets. They are livestock. Land is needed. Space is needed. Both of which you have illusioned to not have (but I may be wrong). So, look at what you said and don't be surprised at the outbreak of cries to refrain from horse ownership.

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You started well by coming here to Horsecity, even though members' passion for them might make them quite defensive.

We have aseen a LOT of abuse and neglect from owners who do not know anything about taking care of a horse, so their alarm is justified.

You did make it clear that you know nothing about horses or their care. Because this is true you want to stop altogether thinking about what you will need to have in order to keep one, and focus instead on what you need to know.

The suggestions to find a situation in which you can be around horses and learn from experienced people is the absolute best thing you can do right now. The second best thing s to start reading; forums are good for this, as are books by competent horsepeople. There are plenty of horse care books out there, Sally Swift, Cherry Hill and John Lyons are among other authors who have written well on the subject.

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I'm attempting to acquire an enhanced understanding of how this sort of thing works. I understand that a horse is a huge investment of money time and land, and I am not as dumb as a few of you must take me for.

Now I propose the question again: How would I go about learning more about horses, specifically mini horses.

Jeez, welcome to HC... I'm sorry for the introduction to the community you've received. You'll learn to be careful with how you say things in a forum sometimes out of necessity, though this place is awesome for what you need, and that is research. It's also great for support despite your first impression. I for one am paying closest attention to the above statement and here are my suggestions:

*Forums, books, magazines, etc = Read a lot! Get an encycleopedia (or two or three) and read it cover to cover and then keep it for reference.

*Craig's List or another form of public local advertising. You can get yourself connected to 4-H groups or local horse people who you can shadow on the job or ask direct questions to. Offer yourself a few hours a week to help out here and there around stables.

Like I said, you really start from the bottom when you have a desire for horse-knowledge. I feel like mini's are more like an achievement you unlock, and horses in general are the game. You gotta know anatomy, breeds, diseases & ailments. You will learn about feed from grains to hay to supplements, vet care for emergencies and day to day, etc etc etc. Basically all the questions you're asking about cost and enviornment is exactly where you start. If this is really something you want then just stay dedicated to learning and eventually experiencing and you'll get there someday.

Welcome :smileywavey:

Edited by MiSSxZURi

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How in the world did I miss this thread?! lol

Best thing for you to do at this point is get hands-on. Find a place with minis and go take a tour and learn about their care and needs. Pay especial attention to health issues and management of a mini. Even within the mini realm there are different sizes, dwarfism, etc.

You can only learn so much from books and magazines and online reading. Granted, you can learn a fair amount, but nothing compares to hands-on handling!

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Alright, lots of shotgunned out points to elaborate so im going to take this post-by-post.

@Nick: What I mean is, the royalties and payments that I will be making by the time I consider ownership of a mini. Yes, I'm not out of high school yet and I know it will be very important to do as much research and hands-on training that I can. Next year I plan on taking an Equine Biology course at my school (Implying it still exists, freaking administrators love to cut classes that are interesting) in order to learn the very very basics of horses.

@Hoku: I was proposing a hypothetical based on something that is already set up at my current residence. I was thinking that if I were to take what is set up now (As it is fairly large, but not horse-sized) and scale it up to the sizes needed to accommodate a mini that it would have a snowball's chance of working. When I say I know nothing, its pretty much exactly nothing.

@Greenhaven: Being honest with you, in my utopia all animal abusers would be put to death so believe me that is not my intention. I'm truly sorry if I came off on the wrong foot with my propositions of a hypothetical though I was simply going off of something read online about a type of setup like that which was used with a guide-mini for a blind person (Yes they have those) I did not intend to raise alarm or offend anybody. I'll google some material by the authors you suggested and stay an active member of this forum, despite your community's quickness to run a hunter-killer on me (seriously, its a good thing I signed up here with my pen name, I'm NOT Planning on being d0xed by some people who I'm trying to get help from) Its good to know you have strong opinions regarding the care of horses and I intend to care for them in the highest degree.

@MissxZuri: Thanks for the actual welcome, its very appreciated :grin:. I have a friend who is on the High school Equestrian team who owns two horses I believe and I plan on learning alot from working with her if I can. There is actually a horse arena just ouside of town that I could probably volunteer my time at in the persuit of knowledge. I like how you worded minis being like an unlockable rather than a game of their own, I feel like a fish out of water here believe me.

@Serah Rose: Dunno, for the past however long that I've been letting it sit to gather posts it has been mostly hate mail and a few Hunter-Killers. Are there any books in particular that you can reccommend to me for reading? I don't know if there is a place around that cares specifically for minis but I can do some googling if you know a good place to start.

Some other important things to note: Once I know where i'm going after college it might be possible for me to telecommute through use of wireless data storage systems, which means that I would be able to live somewhere rural with alot of land and space and still do my work, this will not be the case though if I cannot in which I would need to formulate another idea. If I end up living somewhere in the city close to where I plan on working if all goes well then I'll be screwed out of ownership untill I can find something else to do such as boarding or simply waiting untill I've retired and moved to somewhere nice and quiet where I can have all the land and horses I can support.

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Living in the city does not preclude you from owning horses, you will just have to travel to them. College, however, often does. Even lifetime horse-owners who have competed extensively and had a lot of years to bond with their horse(s) many times find themselves selling their horse because of the extreme commitment that school requires.

Again, focusing on the "how do I learn what I need to know" will serve you much better than wondering about where you will live and how much land you will have. Those things are fine to fantasize about (most of us girls have done just that since we were toddlers) but will compete for space in that portion of your brain that needs to be learning about the horses themselves. :smilie:

MISSxZuri said it well, particularly in gamer jargon: you can't skip levels and expect to beat the boss. Learn each step well and thoroughly and your experience will be that much better when the time comes.

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Here is the thing though.... it takes TWO seconds to google something like "Basic Horse Care" and get a TON of good information to read through, that would have indicated immediately that some of the things mentioned were far far far from a good idea.

You said that you had done a random google search, yet still came here making statements that included "I am simply looking for a companion animal (Because as an aspiring game designer, I won't have the time that is required to be dedicated to my horse if it were a full size breed)"

I just googled "Mini horse requirements" and the third hit starts out with this statement: "Miniature horses require almost exactly the same kinds of care and treatment as their full sized cousins, although they do eat less."

Did you look up mini-horses and information about them? Did you start your own research at all?

No one comes to horses knowing everything, and everyone needs support and has questions. However, I also believe that one needs to have the desire and ability to at least try to gather information on their own first before defaulting to asking other people to spoon feed some of the most basic information available.

Read these, get yourself informed, and THEN come back and ask some question. You have to start with a little self motivation first.

http://horses.about.com/od/basiccare/u/basichorsecare.htm

http://www.horses-and-horse-information.com/horsecare.shtml

The above are the first two google hits on "basic horse care", and the information is FREE.

You are interested in Mini's? Google Mini horses and read up on them.

No one expects anyone to know everything about horses when they first start. PERSONALLY, I do expect people to put some effort into doing some learning on their own, digesting information and forming questions that are not easily resolved with a few minutes of simple searching.

Harsh and rude? Perhaps. I hold people to higher standards than they hold themselves at times.

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just curious, why the sudden interest in horses? most of us have been *horse crazy* before we were of an age in the double digits.

okay--here is a beginner's check list for you to google: (specific to minis)

-*prey animals* (horses), and then *predator* (YOU, well not just you), and the difference between lateral and direct line thinking.

-hoof care (your nails grow too) and the cost of trimming every 6-8 weeks or as needed. (or you can take a course in barefoot trimming, and do it yourself. hope you're short if you decide to go that route.)

-tooth care (yes they need a dental check-up just like you), and the cost of annual dental appointments.

-feeding do's and don'ts and the dangers of laminitis (cost)

-pasture management (cost)

-fly control (cost)

-regular immunizations and other vet-related expenses (cost)

so the common thread here on your beginner's list is cost, cost, cost, cost and MORE costs.

the other observation i would respectfully make is that your approach to *having minis* or horses in general is the way i talk about having a vegetable garden. (i'll just feed and water it right?). this is a BIG fallacy, and one that often gets novice horse owners in trouble.

horses are prey animals that nature programmed with a work ethic to stay alive. in the wild they have several jobs; find food and water, be quicker than predators, breed and keep a safe and sane herd order.

domesticated? they get room service, are sometimes kept in solitary confinement and don't move enough and get fat and develop vices. (remind you of anything? like people .)

think about giving your mini a job, and the most fun thing that comes to mind is pulling a gig. they're good pullers, and driving is a lot of fun (and COSTS) . just like you need challenges and a work ethic horses do too and suffer when this need is not attended too.

this is a HUGE commitment. bigger than you know. the more you learn about it (especially the COST FACTOR) the more you might find starting a small apple orchard a better option.

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I think it's great that you have the desire and drive to want a horse in your life. They way you phrased how you wanted a horse in your first post ie no proper corral, not enough time to devote to the horse. Did send up red warning flags.

If you google Horses Seized

literally thousands of cases will pop up about people who on a lark bought horses or minis or foals and through ignorance or stupidity the animals either died or had to be humanly destroyed because their owners never gave them the proper care and feeding.

Horse Rescues are filled to over flowing and horses are dieing every day because of people.

When I was three years old my aunt and my mother started renting horses at a riding and boarding stables. At that point in time, there were lots of books with stories about horses. Very few of them actually explained the million and one things you need to know about how to care for them. My mom and aunt each bought a horse and the horses were boarded at the stables. Leo the owner was a person that if he liked you, he sold you a good to fair horse. If he didn't, hopefully you had good medical coverage or enjoyed being the owner of a horse that had health or attitude problems.

After being horse owners for a year, we moved fifty miles away to property where we could see our horses every day in our back yard. Our horses were lucky that we'd moved to a place where there was:

A great vet who loved to show people how to care for horses the right way and took the time to carefully explain it to us.

A cantankerous blacksmith who taught us about hooves, lameness, cleaning hooves, how to spot correctness in a horse.

A store owner who not only sold feed & tack. He explained how much and what to feed each horse, how to slowly add or decrease when changing feed or hay, how to pick out good tack that fit the horse and how to keep the tack in good shape.

Most of all we had wonderful neighbors who grew up on a ranch and came over to help us remove the dangerous fence (we thought was great)that sliced open the cheek of my father's filly. Gave us the names & phone numbers of the vet, blacksmith and feed guy. Who helped us and our horses to survive our loving ignorance.

The frightening this is....If even one, of these important people hadn't come into our lives. One at a time our horses would have died.

The reason that I suggested helping at a Horse Rescue is that you will have hands on, in the trenches learning on horse behavior, the correct ways to care for horses, how to keep a horse healthy & safe. You will see with your own eyes what happens to the poor horses that had owners who bought them on a lark.

The wonderful thing is when you buy your horse. It will have a loving, dedicated, informed owner who has learned all the lessons and now knows how to save a horse. You will know how to be better than just a horse owner. You'll have joined the ever evolving, ever learning status of being a Horsewoman.

Luck to you on your games and your future as a Horsewoman.

Edited by dondie

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We've visited mini horse farms because I had thought about getting one before and the one complaint they had was that people bought these horses then treated them like dogs and as a result ended up with mean little monsters. They are smaller but must be treated like a horse.

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