Sign in to follow this  
eventer170

Can't Get Boomer To Canter!

Recommended Posts

I have posted a topic about boomer before and how he was bolting and spooking. I went to a clinic (Clinton Anderson) and got help. Now im having an issue with getting a canter. When he does canter it's pretty much just him flailling every where. He is only 5 (Standardbred) and I understand I need to do ground work and start slow with *patience* but I dont know where to start! Boomer canters around the pasture and when I ask him to in the arena and he trots beautifuly. When I ask him to canter I use my inside leg and click but his canter is really bumpy and last for 5 seconds then he breaks down into a trot. He has never kicked or reared or bucked with me on him and his trot is very controlable. I appreciate all of you guys help! thanks! I have been riding since I was six so I am pretty comftorable riding at walk trot canter gallop and we can jump pretty well to.

Edited by eventer170

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ground work is often the answer, but if this horse understands how to give correctly to a bit, then there is a time you need to get on and ride, as other wise you are not able to use legs on the horse, and getting that correct movement from behind comes first and foremost, and it requires being able to drive the horse up with your legs when needed

To stop flailing around, the horse has to be engaged behind. You also have to make it easy, through correct body position, for him to pick up that lead, thus you should have some elements of body control on the horse, unless you just want to get him cantering, where you use speed and direction of the circle to achieve this

leads start in the back, thus you should have enough body control on your horse to move that hip slightly into the lead. You then drive the horse up without side leg.

Don't worry too much at this point, on head set, as you don't want the horse to feel 'trapped' , if just learning to canter. But you need to use enough outside leg to keep him engaged, riding back to front, more legs than reins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you provide some more information? Answers to these questions can help in diagnosing the situation.

Does Boomer walk and trot well?

Does Boomer canter well without a rider?

Do you canter well on other horses?

How are you asking for the canter?

When asked to canter, does Boomer try to trot fast? Does he turn suddenly? Does he kick out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know many English riders use inside leg as well as outside leg, asking for a canter, but if you are only using your inside leg, then you very likely are just getting his front lead, and he could be out of lead behind.

I don't use my inside leg to ask for the actual lope or canter, but on a green horse, if he is leaning on that inside shoulder, I will bump that shoulder up, with inside leg, just before I ask for that canter/lope , with outside leg just behind the girth

Leads start in the back, and if a horse is correct in back, it will follow through tot he correct lead in front. For a horse that wants to break, you can continue to keep your outside leg on him, or put it back on, when you feel he wants to break, and drive him up. Make sure you are not confusing him by hanging on his head

Before I ask a horse to canter or lope, i have a few basics on him. Hip and shoulder control, and some face.

You then can set him up, so that it is easy for him to pick up the desired lead. By moving the hip slightly into the lead, you are set up for the first beat of a correct three beat canter or lope. Beats are counted when the leg(s) making that beat are on the ground

First beat is when outside rear leg is on the ground

Second beat when inside hind and outside front leg hit the ground at about the same time.

Third beat is when the inside (lead) front leg hits the ground.

There then is a moment of suspension, when all legs are off of the ground at the same time, and then the next stride starts

You might find this video useful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was this horse off the track as a trotter? I have seen standardbreds at some of the stables I've boarded at who have been raced and have difficulty transitioning from just trotting to cantering. You are going to have to start on the ground and get after him, "pushing" him into the canter by clucking, hitting the ground with a whip or stick and string (ala Clinton) and using the word canter so that when he breaks into the canter you can reward him by praising and releasing the pressure. Repeating this over and over should help you to overcome this issue. Once he gets the idea as to what you are asking, you need to make him stay in the canter longer and longer each time, so that when you are in the saddle, he won't break into the trot. If he does break, and you haven't asked him to, just push him right back into the canter. You need to be his leader and not let him get away with doing what he decides to do. I've ridden a couple of standardbreds, and they are generally not comfortable to ride at the canter. Their conformation permits them to push you up and out of the saddle more than other breeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this