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trying to set up an appntmnt to get new tires for my dang car. The tires that are currently on them are 195/60/r14. According to the tire guy I talked to on the phone, my car "doesn't come with tires that size" so I need to go by what the sticker on the door says...

here's the thing - the guy who owned the car before me did some customizing to it - and I think (?) the car has custom wheels or rims or something...(ugh, I wish I knew kinda sorta what I was talking about!?)

So if I end up letting the guy order the tire size on the car's sticker thingy, and not the tire size that the car currently has, there's a chance that the tire won't fit the wheel? or rim? or something!? ahhhhhhhhhh Why weren't my dad and brother's car people!?

link to the pic of the car in question, in case that helps. https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/578954_10151265094313480_1451120535_n.jpg

HC won't let me post pics anymore! I hate this upgrade.

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Take the car to him and let him make the call.

But to answer your question, yes, custom wheels/rims can change tire size.

You may have multiple tire options/price options for those rims, which is why I suggest just taking it over there and going through the choices with the tire guy.

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I did just get done chatting with my cousin's husband...he helped me out a bit and explained it so this girl almost understood.

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Take a look at Pirellis...got them on my car and love them. But yes, if there are aftermarket rims on the car then you need to go with what will fit on the rim. What the car came with is irrelevent. If that is the size that is on the rim, that is what you go with.

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Costco! The tires I have on my car right now are NOT manufacturer. I have a lower rim size then stock. I think its 16r whereas stock is 17 or 18r. Unless you want to buy new rims you need to keep the size the same as what you have on there right now. :)

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If you're happy with the ride and performance of the tires you have now then you don't need to switch sizes. His computer systems tells him what the car came with stock. There's a range of tire sizes that will work, especially if it's been customized some. He or any other store, can quote you tires based on the size you currently have. If he can't quote you based on a non-stock size then that's not the tire store you want to buy from. It's not going to explode if you put the same size back on.

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Looking at the picture, I would say those were after market rims. Chances are the stock size tires will not fit on those rims. If the guy at the tire store can not quote you a price for the size you have, go to a different store. Chances are he wants to sell you new rims to fit the original tires. Rims are something that is easy to customize and is done pretty often. It doesn't matter what the book says the car came with if you have custom rims.

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I told him I thought they were aftermarket rims...lol. And he wasn't trying to sell me anything more expensive - I already know the tire I want to get, it's got great reviews and is actually affordable. It was just a size thing. I'll bite the bullet and drive allllll the way to wisconsin tomorrow to have the darn place look at the tires themselves.

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:rotf: Arew you sure yoiur driving a car????Ok if you are geometrically challenged do not reply to this post! Wheel size is base on OME specs.. because you think some BYM has Customized your car ... by buying an aftermarket rim you are WRONG.. tires are based on gearing in your tranny... to get the proper speed on the odometer.. then your dealing with offset of your rims.. width to offset , to wheel space squared to the area it rotates on the axis of your third axle arms, wheel circumference..caster and camber of the rig you are driving....

So read the door jam.. If you have the proper rim sizes...say 15 " or 16" on the wheel.. the 225 or 245 size is the wall width of the tire itself...which is measured from the edge of the wheel ( the metal thingy) to the edge of the outside of the tire itself.. In most cases you can get away if a FACTORY tire says 225 to expand to a 235 without any problems the 75 or say 65 is the width of the tire or the foot print on the ground.. Which will come into a factor of how much wheel space you have in the wheel well...you can by math get away up to a larger width which is the lower number .. like I have used as an example...the wall size of the TIRE is the 225 to 235 is based on the area in the wheel well of the car x the width of the tire ....based on the width of the wheel... the larger the wall size the wider the outside edge of the tire.. of course then there is the tire weight grade which is based on C D E or F which is the stiffness of the wall of the tire...How tall the tire will stand..is what the 225, 235 265 is based on.the taller the tire the less space you have to turn YOUR car by the area you have in our wheel well..based on your caster and camber...

Now if you have a car that says a 16 is Ok but you have a 15 on the rim , the rotor or the drum has been changed to fit the smaller rim . so any rim higher than the OEM rim will fit.. if the OEM rim is 16 going down to 15 you need to change the hardware of the brakes... smaller brakes less stoping ability for larger rigs..The circumferance of the wheel determines this..en there is always the wheel bolt pattern to figure .... but later...

In other words... if you do not have the proper weight, OEM specs from the door to the MOEM specs customized will always cause less of everything...... more show and no go... tires and rims are like shoes.... proper sizes will cost less, do more, and on the practical sides of things work better...and hurt less......

Of course picking out a tire is also based on the compound and the tread the tire has.. A tire with factory sipping is better than a tire wiith studs. An open tread design will not have a high hydroplane issue. It will allow water..snow and mud to escape from the tire surface to ensure good traction no matter what the condition.. closed tire tracs will keep the outer influences to stay trapped in the tire.. The softer the compound of a tire will be based on the fact how long it will last on the road.. A softer compound say 30 to 40 will burn off in hotter climates than cold climates yet a softer compound will stick to ice if properly sipped. I've always raced a 30 compound on clay surfaces but prefer a 50 to 60 for year round use in ALASKA on a truck or car.. I can get 80,000 miles of this type of compound tire on a one ton truck ..... so this factor also has to be figured into cost, usability, and longevity...

Now the off set of a dually tire ... if you have questions .. juat ask .. its another ball game all together....its based on tire wall size and the type of off set the wheels have.. or spacers for larger rigs...

On the race track ....running dirt ... it also was based on tire pressure .. but thats mostly above the regular guys pay scale....as far as the reason why they stay on the rims when hit by another two thousand pound car... Priceless..but with anything its up to the driver to do the best they can with the equipment they are given..

AD

Oh and PS... if your driving a car with 14 inch tires..... :rotf::rotf: :rotf: Are you sure your driving a CAR??????

Edited by Alaskandraft

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there's no sticker in the door. i assume because of the custom paint job. and thats essentially all i got from your post...lol. i'll reread it when it's not 1am....

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Agreed with what the others said, in that the tire size you need will be affected by the rims on the car. If those are aftermarket rims, especially with the size of your car, what the manufacturer suggests as a tire size most likely won't fit. So, yeah, I'm going with the others you'll probably have to have the guy look at it to figure out what size you need.

To sum what AD said up, not much was pertinent to what you want to do with your car. Basically, if you're looking to get the absolute best out of your car (dealing with transmission works, etc.), then you should be having the factory sized wheels on your car, as all of that is considered when selecting the size of wheels to put on cars when it's being built. So, if you change something like the size of the wheels, then how ideally your car performs may be affected.

That being said, with the size of your car, and from the looks of it the small difference in manufacturer suggested wheels and the wheels on your car, not to mention age, etc., as well as how much you're wanting to put into it, money wise.....it's a moot point. You're just looking for what size tire will fit.

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Costco! The tires I have on my car right now are NOT manufacturer. I have a lower rim size then stock. I think its 16r whereas stock is 17 or 18r. Unless you want to buy new rims you need to keep the size the same as what you have on there right now. :)

I was surprised to find that America's Tire/Discount Tire was cheaper than Costco -- and a lot more convenient -- last time I bought tires. Waiting all day at Costco is not my idea of a good time, so unless there's a big price difference, I'm sticking with America's Tire. I had an appointment, it was done fast, and they have lots of free follow-up stuff. It was awesome-o.

Serah, enjoy the squeaky first moments of the new tires. It always makes me smile!

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Kina Kat is correct.

Americas Tire, ( or Discount tire on the internet), does a bang up job.

And...they were both cheaper, and quicker than going to Costco. ( whom I walked out of for that very reason!).

I just put 4 new tires on the 1 ton, and yeah, sticker shock!

I needed 265-70-18's, and in load rating "E", with a good wear, and all weather tread.

I settled for BF Goodrich, all terrain tires, that set us back....wait for it...$1100 !

Installed with all the nesessary stuff like balance, new stems, alignment, and was out the door in 1 hr10 min!!

I loved my Michellins that came on the truck, but the cost was about $45 more per tire.

Edited by siseley

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So read the door jam.. If you have the proper rim sizes...say 15 " or 16" on the wheel.. the 225 or 245 size is the wall width of the tire itself...which is measured from the edge of the wheel ( the metal thingy) to the edge of the outside of the tire itself.. In most cases you can get away if a FACTORY tire says 225 to expand to a 235 without any problems the 75 or say 65 is the width of the tire or the foot print on the ground.. Which will come into a factor of how much wheel space you have in the wheel well...you can by math get away up to a larger width which is the lower number .. like I have used as an example...the wall size of the TIRE is the 225 to 235 is based on the area in the wheel well of the car x the width of the tire ....based on the width of the wheel... the larger the wall size the wider the outside edge of the tire.. of course then there is the tire weight grade which is based on C D E or F which is the stiffness of the wall of the tire...How tall the tire will stand..is what the 225, 235 265 is based on.the taller the tire the less space you have to turn YOUR car by the area you have in our wheel well..based on your caster and camber...

AD you flipped the two around. The larger number and the first number in a tire size (I will use mine as an example 265/75R16) is the width of the tire or it's 'footprint' on the ground. So 265 is the tread width of the tire from sidewall to sidewall (measured in millimeters). The middle number my 75 is the height of the sidewall, that is measured as the 'Aspect ratio'. Tells you the height of the tire from the bead (where the tire meets the rim) to the top of the tread (or foot print). It is a percentage of the tire width. So if you use the aspect ratio at 75, the tire's height is 75 percent of its width, or 176.25 mm ( .75 x 235 = 176.25 mm, or 6.94 in). The smaller this number is, the wider the tire in relation to its height.

When you start to customize tire size from what your OE (original equipment) is you can actually throw off your fuel economy and your speedometer. But if you keep the diameter within 3% of your original size (for cars and vans) it shouldn't have much effect. It is also always recommended to 'upgrade' your tire size than to 'downgrade' it. Trucks can often take a diameter change of 15%.

Most companies have rules now that they can only put on the manufacturers recommended size. This is for liability purposes. I used to work at one so I know this! It can upset some people, but when it comes to larger companies and liability there isn't much you can do. Some places if you come in with an after market rim will put the same size on that you had, but they need to see it and make sure it meets their safety recommendations. So don't feel too bad, the guy wasn't trying to get over on you. Probably just watching his butt!

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AD you flipped the two around. The larger number and the first number in a tire size (I will use mine as an example 265/75R16) is the width of the tire or it's 'footprint' on the ground. So 265 is the tread width of the tire from sidewall to sidewall (measured in millimeters). The middle number my 75 is the height of the sidewall, that is measured as the 'Aspect ratio'. Tells you the height of the tire from the bead (where the tire meets the rim) to the top of the tread (or foot print). It is a percentage of the tire width. So if you use the aspect ratio at 75, the tire's height is 75 percent of its width, or 176.25 mm ( .75 x 235 = 176.25 mm, or 6.94 in). The smaller this number is, the wider the tire in relation to its height.

When you start to customize tire size from what your OE (original equipment) is you can actually throw off your fuel economy and your speedometer. But if you keep the diameter within 3% of your original size (for cars and vans) it shouldn't have much effect. It is also always recommended to 'upgrade' your tire size than to 'downgrade' it. Trucks can often take a diameter change of 15%.

Most companies have rules now that they can only put on the manufacturers recommended size. This is for liability purposes. I used to work at one so I know this! It can upset some people, but when it comes to larger companies and liability there isn't much you can do. Some places if you come in with an after market rim will put the same size on that you had, but they need to see it and make sure it meets their safety recommendations. So don't feel too bad, the guy wasn't trying to get over on you. Probably just watching his butt!

_________________________________________________________________________________

wish the quote feature worked properly....but dingdingding!!! My odometer is off by about 4mph (on the slow side, so that's good...I get to pretend I'm speeding when I'm really not! haha) but my fuel economy is pretty good, at 35mpg, got 43 mpg when I drove in the mountains. It'd be super nice to get even better fuel economy...

Monday is my drive to the place and get the tires looked at day. joy. My checking account is already cringing :D

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The S model I am finding a lot that the OEM tires are P175/70/R13. So taking that into consideration it looks like the previous owner upgrading to the more Si or Vtech model tires and rims. Which is ok, the vehicle can handle it. You are looking at about a 1.2% diameter percentage diameter difference than the original. Within the 3%.

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