webo124

Intro And Riding Pictures!

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I love this shot.

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Finally some stretch after all this hard work Mom!

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A fun one - he totally looks like he's smiling!

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Thanks for looking!

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he looks like a very nice horse and you a very nice rider, but from what i see in these photos i recommend you do a LOT of riding "free style". this means you ride patterns (circles, clover leaves, bow-ties, point to point) on a completely loose rein (and i do mean completely) and completely off your seat, legs and weight distribution. this will simultaneously accomplish several things; 1) you will stop being fussy with your hands (you won't HAVE them) and learn to communicate more clearly with your seat and legs. 2) he will learn to take responsibility (don't change gaits, don't change directions), because you will ONLY use your reins for correction and then drop them immediately--it becomes his JOB. 3) he will start to learn about self-carriage because you're not carrying his front end around anymore. either he carries himself or he falls on his face. if you're worried about him getting too fast you can tie a string around his neck and just pick that up if you get panicked--it works!!

about your forward tendency, i ride 4 times a year with gerd heuschmann, one of the world's leading authorities on the biomechanics of the horse. he has us riding a LOT in a two-point, because he says it's the most efficient way to get off a horse's back (encouraging the horse to OPEN its back and stretch the spine), and learn the HORSE'S rhythmn rather than impose our own. i guess you're familiar with the dressage mantra: "rhythmn leads to relaxation", but first you need to find the HORSE'S rhythmn for him to relax. so go ahead and get out of the saddle and off his back and find HIS rhythmn (you'll start listening for it--if you play an instrument you'll know what i mean). i recommend you stop looking down with your whole head though. an adult human head weighs a fair amount and can influence the way a horse carries himself. try just moving your eyeballs down haha.

you do NOT have *straightness*. horse's have various strategies to evade the bit; some bury their heads, some go behind the vertical, and your's has his head going semi-laterally. take another look at your pictures. the only one in which he's straight is the one you call *stretching*. riding freestyle will help a lot with that too.

other than that i think you look happy together for the most part. just a few misunderstandings going on.

(if you're wondering what i base my opinions on, it's because i'm going through a lot of this too :lol: . although i have the opportunity to chase cows every thursday, and believe it or not that causes a some of this stuff to correct itself automatically. you can't be fussy with your hands or sloppy with your body position, because then the horse can't place his body--renvers/travers in a way to cut off a cow.)

Edited by nick

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You have a lovely horse. I envy how green your area is right now. Definitely not what we have right now.

he looks like a very nice horse and you a very nice rider, but from what i see in these photos i recommend you do a LOT of riding "free style". this means you ride patterns (circles, clover leaves, bow-ties, point to point) on a completely loose rein (and i do mean completely) and completely off your seat, legs and weight distribution. this will simultaneously accomplish several things; 1) you will stop being fussy with your hands (you won't HAVE them) and learn to communicate more clearly with your seat and legs. 2) he will learn to take responsibility (don't change gaits, don't change directions), because you will ONLY use your reins for correction and then drop them immediately--it becomes his JOB. 3) he will start to learn about self-carriage because you're not carrying his front end around anymore. either he carries himself or he falls on his face. if you're worried about him getting too fast you can tie a string around his neck and just pick that up if you get panicked--it works!!

about your forward tendency, i ride 4 times a year with gerd heuschmann, one of the world's leading authorities on the biomechanics of the horse. he has us riding a LOT in a two-point, because he says it's the most efficient way to get off a horse's back (encouraging the horse to OPEN its back and stretch the spine), and learn the HORSE'S rhythmn rather than impose our own. i guess you're familiar with the dressage mantra: "rhythmn leads to relaxation", but first you need to find the HORSE'S rhythmn for him to relax. so go ahead and get out of the saddle and off his back and find HIS rhythmn (you'll start listening for it--if you play an instrument you'll know what i mean). i recommend you stop looking down with your whole head though. an adult human head weighs a fair amount and can influence the way a horse carries himself. try just moving your eyeballs down haha.

you do NOT have *straightness*. horse's have various strategies to evade the bit; some bury their heads, some go behind the vertical, and your's has his head going semi-laterally. take another look at your pictures. the only one in which he's straight is the one you call *stretching*. riding freestyle will help a lot with that too.

other than that i think you look happy together for the most part. just a few misunderstandings going on.

(if you're wondering what i base my opinions on, it's because i'm going through a lot of this too :lol: . although i have the opportunity to chase cows every thursday, and believe it or not that causes a some of this stuff to correct itself automatically. you can't be fussy with your hands or sloppy with your body position, because then the horse can't place his body--renvers/travers in a way to cut off a cow.)

Loved reading your advice on here. I'll make sure to look up more posts of yours!

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I really liked the advice nick gave you. Great learning for me to as I read about he typed up. What I was going to mention tho, I wonder if your saddle fits you properly? it looks like the flap is to long for your lower leg. I was able to find a great link with pictures to show how good saddle fitting should be. http://www.trumbullmtn.com/2011/08/saddle-fit-for-the-rider/

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