texas53

What Is A Good Coat/hoof/general Health Supplement?

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Would be interested to hear from everybody thoughts on supplements,supplement they use and why.I am looking for a good coat/hoof/general health supplement. :smile:

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i've been feeding 100 ml of linseed oil per day for an 8 gelding that was shedding out in a WIERD way and just didn't put on weight/muscle despite being an enthusiastic eater and regular work (dressage, jumping, trailriding, soccer, chasing cows, circus tricks) for two weeks now, and i've seen a big difference in his coat and weight. and he EATS it without going "ack, phooey".

he's barefoot and has great hoof *substance* so that wasn't an issue. is there something in particular you're wanting to improve?

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Well, hay and oats are feed, not supplements.

Any horses diet should mainly consist of forage. Once you know what you are feeding, then you supplement what is missing, based on the diet your horse is eating and his needs, and not something a horse on the other end of the country needs,fed a completely different diet or in a way different work load

Over supplementing is a drain on the pocket book, at the very least, and dangerous in some cases, with ahorse being supplemented something like selenium from two different sources

Fats will add shine, plus supply essencial fatty acids and cool calories. The Fats recommended for horses are flax, canola oil (and fish oil, which horses won't eat ), as they contain Omega 3 and 6 in the acceptable ratio

If a horse needs help to grow good hooves, then there are supplements that are specifically designed to do so, like Formula4Feet,,, Farrier's Formula

If your horse is dry lotted, he should be supplemented vit a and e, s both are quickly lost in hay, and also omega 3 and 6. Horses on pasture do not need to be supplemented with omega 3 and 6

Some info on fat supplements, esp flax

http://www.balancedequine.com.au/nutrition/linseed.html

Edited by Smilie

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I've had multiple horses eat fish oil (you just have to condition them to think it's a treat...takes a week or two...lol) But flax is so much easier :)

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I got a bag of flax and a $10 coffee grinder and grind just before feeding....4oz. each. (for a yearling, I'd start at 2-3oz/day) Flax has the perfect omega balance for horses. So does chia and you don't have to grind it. My bag of flax lasts 3 horses well over 6 months. Omega 3 (anti-inflammatory) is higher than 6 (inflammatory) so its an anti-inflammatory for the whole body. 6 isn't bad though, its about balance. Omega 6 is the health of the alarm system that gets important in older horses. The balance with the higher 6 comes in sunflower seeds. The omegas are also the only fat that the horse requires. Any other oil is just fat and has no nutritional value whatsoever. Fat is fat. I figure you may as well load it into a needle and inject it under the skin to make fatty pads, cause that's exactly where its going. What you don't see is the fat accumulating around the organs. (the feed bag label should not exceed 5% fat and if they aren't touting low iron, its probably high and if you can't see a number for iron, they are hiding it and you have to call them, sigh) Getting the hay tested and setting your own path is easier.

The winter coats are out around here now and what is underneath is magnificent. Feed trace minerals and flax and you get a deep shine, in the color they were meant to be. Copper and zinc being deficient in the face of high iron, bleached ends on manes, tails, brown noses, eyes, poor hooves etc. is a copper deficiency, damage that has been happening and has allowed the sun to bleach. I turned such a horse to jet black, in the summer sun once. I've seen this mottled color mistaken for anemia and high iron supplements fed instead....ahh!) Copper is also very important for the strength of connective tissue in the hoof.

But like Smiley says, get the hay tested and get it balanced. You'll be filling the holes on the whole nine yards....protein, DE, major minerals, trace minerals. electrolytes, sugar, starch, etc. You can order a customized supplement that is free of iron, is right for your hay and perfect for her. They'll even put it in a flax base for you, but shipping is cheaper if you add the flax in the barn. I can't remember how much that bag of flax cost me, its been so long since I've bought one, lol.

My take on the words supplements?

Horses are designed to eat grass. Anything other than grass, is a supplement. He goes and eats something else next to the grass, he's supplementing his own diet. Everything we provide is supplemented to the horse. All of it is supplements. Hay is just as much a supplement as chondroitin sulphate is. Its the balance that is key. :smilie:

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Flax is always my answer for coat health!

Biotin and methionine are two VERY important ingredients for hoof health, but check your feed tag! A lot of products already have this in there. If it doesn't, a supplement that has these two items will suffice.

General health: check your feed tag for quality ingredients such as beet pulp, soy beans, alfalfa, essential amino acids for growth and muscle maintenance, omega 3 and 6 for healthy skin and support of normal tissue function, optimum levels of vitamin E, C, and selenium reduce damage from aging and exercise (and boost immunity). Stay away from products with a lot of corn, feeds with high sugar and starches. And ALWAYS feed quality hay!

One way you can tell if you have a quality feed product is to read the very first three ingredients on the list. If it states quality products (example: beet pulp, soybean hulls, wheat middlings) then it is a quality product. If it states unquality products (example: corn, oats, corn distillers) then it isn't.

It's always better to feed your horse quality products to begin with than to pump it with all the nutrients it's missing from it's feed! Just a thought. :)

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My barn feeds Mirra Coat for coat and skin. My gelding's skin and coat look amazing. I don't believe it has any hoof or general health benefits. I am pretty satisfied with the grain they feed so I don't feel the need to add additional supplements.

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