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countrygirl6661

Riding A New Horse!

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Hey yall! im looking for some advice or some coaching on dealing with riding a new horse. He's name is Staccao LOA. He is full blooded Polish Arabian. I'll post his pedigree at the end of this message.

First off he is a show horse, i do belive he was showed in reining but i am not sure. He is very soft mouthed and does not like approve of you being in his mouth all the time which apparently i am. I also not use to riding Arabians. He is my project horse for Barrels. He is a sweet horse but anytime i try to get him into a lope he likes to crow hop. It isnt bad, but it makes me feel like if i push him more he will actually break out and bronc.

Is there any advice or anything i should be doing differently to make him not do this? Any suggestions would be AWESOME!

http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/staccato+loa

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Can you get someone knowledgeable on the ground to help? This sounds like the type of miscommunication that could be easily dealt with the help of a coach. It's hard to say what's going on without seeing, but my first response to crow hopping would be to soften the hand and push forward. Sounds like the energy is there but he is moving up and down instead of out, which makes sense if he has a soft mouth and you are riding with more contact than he is accustomed to.

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try letting him have a longer rein and make sure you don't fuss with ur hands or bump him in the mouth .stay quiet

He probably is getting frustrated as he wants to go but ur telling him no at the same time by tensing up and taking a hold of his reins .arabs are very smart and willing but can be sensitive. If he still does this and u know its not saddle fit or pain then he may just have gotten ur number.

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The girl i ride with rode him with loose reins, he did the same thing to her. My barn owner got him back from a family were little kids rode him. I just think maybe hes use to getting his way and now that experience people are on him, he dont like the fact we wont let him do what he wants to do. Anytime he does it i kick him through it and he will toss his head and comply but if i walk him and wanna go into a trot and lightly kick he will do it again and i will kick him through it again

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The girl i ride with rode him with loose reins, he did the same thing to her. My barn owner got him back from a family were little kids rode him. I just think maybe hes use to getting his way and now that experience people

are on him, he dont like the fact we wont let him do what

he wants to do. Anytime he does it i kick him through it

and he will toss his head and comply but if i walk him

and wanna go into a trot and lightly kick he will do it

again and i will kick him through it again

Ah I see ! Do rule out pain first but yes he just might have

Gotten this bad behavior from having kids ride him and getting his way . Make it clear this is unacceptable behavior. Arabs are also quick learners and that means bad habits too . Get someone to help u nip this in the bud now !!! Start with ground work . He needs to respect you on the ground first . Clinton anderson is great . U tube him.

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Anytime he does it i kick him through it and he will toss his head and comply but if i walk him and wanna go into a trot and lightly kick he will do it again and i will kick him through it again

why are you kicking him? that's not a particularly subtle way to ask for anything. once pain issues are ruled out try a cluck, then a sqeeze and finally rhythmic pressure if none of the above works until he moves into the lope. you also better make sure you're not saying "go" with seat and legs and "STOP!" with your hands. that will annoy even the most tolerant of horses, and if you have a sensitive one i can see where he'd crow hop in protest. ("what do you want?!!!" LOL)

in all seriousness you don't want to this to turn into habitual behavior, which every time he does it, it's headed down that path. i'd start looking around for someone knowledgeable about arabs to help you if you can't get a handle on this VERY soon.

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I also have a Polish Arab. American Ally EF out of Soho Carol. He's a 7 YO gelding I broke and trained myself. He has an extremely smooth extended trot and a rocking chair lope. Arabs go best in a saddle fitted specifically for the breed or a gaited horse saddle with shorter rounded skirts. A barrel saddle should also be suitable. I'd stay away from square skirted or parade style saddles. Get your present saddle professionally evaluated. Make certain it doesn't ride forward onto his withers while riding. You may have to train him to a secured (tightened) flank cinch if the saddle rides forward. Maybe even a croup strap.

Arabs are also renowned for being high spirited. And even many other breeds will start to crow hop or cow kick when asked for a gait above the trot if they have not first been exercised or longed for about 10 minutes to work off the freshness and excitement before mounting. That might be what you are experiencing. Get him to work up a mild sweat before mounting and see if that makes a difference. If not, then I'd concentrate on saddle fit and pain issues. Don't monkey around with this behavior too long. As Nick said, Arabians are super fast learners. And that includes learning the wrong things. ~FH

Edited by FloridaHorseman

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One of my Geldings was a terrible bucker anytime you asked for more than a walk. Unfortunately it took us a little longer than it should have to rule out pain, and I feel terrible about that, but his back ended up being out; plus a little poor saddle fit. So we got him adjusted and in a saddle that actually fit him. After a few rides he realized that the pain wasn't there anymore, and he became a completely different horse. I would suggest lunging him or throwing him in a round pen with/without a saddle and taking him through different speeds to get a better read on what's going on.

It could also just be a flat out lack of respect for you. It might be one of those things that you have to give time and work through. But personally, I don't agree with kicking and riding him through a broncy ride. I believe in shutting down that kind of behavior immediately with a one rein stop, then moving directly into tight circles and serpentines to get them thinking again. Then moving on and allowing them to try that task again without the attitude. You don't have to be mean about it, but you need to be stern and take more control of the situation.

I also have to ask why you think it has to do with him having a soft mouth? I can understand a horse getting annoyed with you constantly being on their face, but that shouldn't be what causes the crow hopping when asking for a lope; unless you're pulling on his face, and asking him to move forward at the same time. In which case, that's on you, not him.

I also think it would be good to completely break down and go over all that it is you're using. For instance, are you using spurs when the previous owner didn't? The same Gelding I mentioned here absolutely hates spurs. They will send him into a huge fit, so I make sure not to use them on him. I also know that those little snaps on your reins can give you trouble. They constantly bump against the bit, and if he's already sensitive, he's not going to like that. Are his teeth in good shape? Are you using a good quality pad? A different bit than he's used to, or perhaps just one that he doesn't like? Could it be something like ulcers?

There are honestly so many different things that could be going on that without experiencing this for ourselves and seeing him in person, all we can really do is guess based on our own experiences. I've never owned an Arabian, but I know they have a stereotype of being high strung. It could honestly just be that he's gotten away with this behavior for years, and is being a brat. I would start off getting a vet check done, so that you can rule that out for sure, and then go from there. Good luck! I know it's not always the most fun to work with a grouchy horse like this, but they're usually the best ones in the end of it all.

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... even many other breeds will start to crow hop or cow kick when asked for a gait above the trot if they have not first been exercised or longed for about 10 minutes to work off the freshness and excitement before mounting. That might be what you are experiencing. Get him to work up a mild sweat before mounting and see if that makes a difference... ~FH

Just realized I missed a key element I too often take for granted when I post about warm up longeing:

During the warm up energetically longe the horse at a lope, canter or gallop to uncover freshness or underlying resentment to your authority. Don't just mess about with walk/trot and think the horse has been sufficiently longed. You may be surprised at what you find, even with a horse you think you know. ~FH`

Edited by FloridaHorseman

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Just realized I missed a key element I too often take for granted when I post about warm up longeing:

During the warm up energetically longe the horse at a lope, canter or gallop to uncover freshness or underlying resentment to your authority. Don't just mess about with walk/trot and think the horse has been sufficiently longed. You may be surprised at what you find, even with a horse you think you know. ~FH`

agreed. airplane pilots always do a "pre-flight" check. good habit for riders to get into as well.

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Riding or training an Arabian will show and magnify all the faults in your riding or training skills.

You have two choices

1. Let someone else work with this horse

2. Work you butt off trying to be worthy of riding a horse that will give you it's soul if you treat it right.

There are lots of horse breeds that will accept any action from a rider or trainer.

Arabian horses won't.

They were bred for thousands of years to be a companion to the owner's family and a war horse.

You kick hard or hit some horses without any repercussions.

Arabian horses are War Horses and will get you back.

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