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KenzieLynn

2 Year Old Project Gelding

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This is Wyatt, my new project barrel horse. He is just over 2 years old, 13.2 hh Quarter horse (not registered). Picked him up 7/28 from a muddy lot, where he had been picked on by an older mare. Was terrified, wouldn't let us touch him, ran in the opposite direction. It is now day 5 of having him home, and he is the sweetest gelding. Even let me put a blanket on with a "girth". Just want some conformation critique. The only issue I have with him is that he refuses to let me pick up his right hind foot. He is fine with the other three, and I'm guessing he is either sore in that hip area, or it's his hoof (which is missing a good chuck out of it).

I will be adding photos to this album as the days come. I appreciate any and all comments!

http://imgur.com/a/rywiH

*I will try to get him set up right when I go see him today*

Edited by KenzieLynn

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A lot of times its the opposite side bothering them when they refuse to pick up a hind leg, they don't want to carry their weight on the other leg/ hip/ foot. He's cute, how's it going with him?

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Ditto to above post about it usually being the opposite side that's having issues. He is a pretty dude for sure. Good luck with him.

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This is Wyatt, my new project barrel horse. He is just over 2 years old, 13.2 hh Quarter horse (not registered). Picked him up 7/28 from a muddy lot, where he had been picked on by an older mare. Was terrified, wouldn't let us touch him, ran in the opposite direction. It is now day 5 of having him home, and he is the sweetest gelding. Even let me put a blanket on with a "girth". Just want some conformation critique. The only issue I have with him is that he refuses to let me pick up his right hind foot. He is fine with the other three, and I'm guessing he is either sore in that hip area, or it's his hoof (which is missing a good chuck out of it).

I will be adding photos to this album as the days come. I appreciate any and all comments!

http://imgur.com/a/rywiH

*I will try to get him set up right when I go see him today*

Congratulations on rehoming Wyatt. He looks very cute. I like a smaller horse myself. He looks a little bit older than two to me. Does he have papers? He has a nice deep hip and the angles of his hocks seem to match the angle of his shoulder. His neck ties in high and he has a shorter neck, which will keep him from being about to flex his jaw very deeply, so you'll have to get him to flex from the wither rather than the poll. Although he is slightly cowhocked, that could be because of the lack of shoeing, but I like a horse with a little cowhock- they can get deeper in a stop and seem to hold up a little better. He has good bone, and looks like good feet too. His weight isn't bad but I'll bet he hasn't had any dentistry and he probably need his wolf teeth removed (if he's two). He has a sweet expression and who doesn't love a sorrel? Good luck with him!

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Not a bad little horse, with no glaring faults. He appears abit downhill at the moment, but if he is only two, that can change

He appears abit sickle hocked . There is the mistaken idea by some, that this will help ahorse stop better, as his hind legs are already under him some, but it reality, that is not true.

Also, correct conformation, like correct building structure puts less stress on the joints, and it is not true that a horse with aconformation defect will hold up btter to work-that is cintrary to the facts of nature!

This horse is not severely sickle hocked, so should be fine. I just wanted to clear up any mis conceptions

As for cowhocks, where the hocks point in, thus toes angle out-those horses can't hold a sliding stop, as pure physics will tell you that the track of the two hind feet will spread outwards, instead of having those perfect parell slide tracks, valused by reiners

Because the hock takes a great deal of strain in all performance disciplines, correct conformation is essential if the horse is to have a sound and productive working life. Common conformational defects include sickle hocks, post-legged conformation/straight hocks, cow hocks, and bowed hocks. Depending on the use of the horse, some defects may be more acceptable than others.

He is somewhat thick and short in the neck, with a thick throatlatch, but that will improve some with work. I agree he has good bone and his hocks are set close to the ground, which is a plus in a working horse

Edited by Smilie

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He's pretty! Boy, he sure got beat up badly! No wonder he was so terrified! He certainly looks to be at peace now. I wonder if he threw something out, trying to escape that awful mare? Calling in a chiro if nothing is apparent apon inspection. The pathology can even run diagonally to a front hoof sometimes, and anywhere along the spine on the way. Another must is a good balancing trim, stay on top of it and always fight thrush.

I'm no help on the conformation, though I know enough to see he's just fine in that dept. I'm just glad that he is at peace now and is with you. He's going the be the horse and more, that the previous owners never knew they had in their barn. Tough luck to them! Enjoy!

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I'd say have the chiro out, and then see if that cow-hocked-ness doesn't resolve itself. My mare stands like that when she is having SI issues.

He is, however, fairly sickle-hocked and there is nothing to do about that one. I agree he looks mature for his age, but 13.2 is quite small. Have fun!

Is he Two-Eyed Jack bred? He sure has that head! Not that that's a bad thing....just some things scream out atcha sometimes.

Edited by Greenhaven

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