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I am now a Junior in high school and have started looking at colleges. After a lot of researching I have narrowed my search to three- University of Findlay, Lake Erie College, and Centenary College.

I want to double major in accounting and equine science. I know that equine degrees aren't worth much but I want to at least try to make it in the industry that I love so much. And if that fails then there's always accounting to back me up. I have been doing lessons off and on my whole life do to money issues. I would love to have the opportunity to learn so much more than I do now. I want to do training and maybe even colt starting- but have absolutely no experience in it. A lot of working student positions want you to already have experience with green horses, colts, training, etc. The only thing I've learned at my lessons is how to groom, tack, and ride and I have been to tons of different barns.

If any of you have attended any of these colleges I would appreciate it if you could give me some insight as to what their equine programs are like. Would they even teach me how to train? I know Findlay gives you a colt to start and break. I would love to have an experience like that. Do any of the other schools do that? How much riding time do you get a week? How much can you improve in your own riding? Can you ride extra like on weekends if you want to practice? If you know anything about their accounting programs that would also be helpful. Or how hard it would be to double major in these two subjects.

Thank you for reading my essay lol :smilie: any other info you have would be helpful too

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colt starting is not for beginners, which i know you're not but sounds like you have no experience in the emotional and mental pitfalls of going about handling a youngster inappropriately. it could end badly for YOU. i'm surprised that a college would just give anybody a colt to start and *break*, and let's throw in a good measure of skepticism to boot. i have ridden for 40 years, eventing, fox and drag hunting, steeplechasing, dressage, stadium jumping, bareback and bridleless riding, circus tricks, carriage driving--one and two in hand, do my own horse's bare foot trim, innoculate, worm and other perfunctory health care procedures, ridden ponies, quarters, warmbloods, thoroughbreds, gaited horses and now have a 9 year old lusitano gelding that i chase cows with, and i wouldn't even dream of trying to start a colt, because dealing with a youngster and a mature horse are two different worlds.

back to your double major question, while i attended a private school in california that had 0 to do with equine sciences and everything to do with econ/poli sci, why not combine your two majors and apply them in the equine industry?? if there is something the entire industry is in dire need of is more people who understand spreadsheets, P&L's and how to balance the books in a half way competent fashion, tax laws, and that if you aren't making a PROFIT you're probably not going to be in business for much longer. in other worlds, the horse world NEEDS competent accountants badly. go for it!!

Edited by nick

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Had a friend that went to Lake Erie, but I don't know much more than that.

Having been a double major for a while, no one can really answer your questions except a counselor at the school who knows how rigorous the programs are and how many classes will count for both programs. Is entirely possible that you'll add a year or two on to your college career.

Nor do I know what kind of previous experience any of those schools require with horses.

I do like nick's suggestion of combining the two majors, an accountant that specializes in equine businesses I think would be well received.

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Thank you for your help and I know that any kind of training is not for beginners. I'm talking about that as way in the future when I have more experience. I do consider myself as a beginner and I have a lot to learn. Thanks for the idea of combining the two. I never even thought of that lol

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Another college you may want to look into is Northwest College ( http://northwestcollege.edu/academics/programs/alphabetical.dot )

They have accounting and equine programs, and it's a very affordable college (unlike the ones you listed! lol. I had looked into those, but in the end I just couldn't afford them!!) Their equine program is very hands-on and practical and really can train a person from the ground up. A lot of their other programs are top rated, and the location attracts some great professors.

I truly believe that a successful graduate from NWC (the first year in the equine program really weeds out the "want-tos" from the "wills") is adequately set up for a startup position (be it intern, working student, beginning lesson instructor, etc.) in the equine industry. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions!!

And I totally agree - I've seen some fabulous work opportunities in the equine industry where accounting has been a major required skill. I would expect combining the degrees into a viable career would be quite easy.

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Consider Cazenovia College out here in NY. I'm currently attending and we have a program that really is catered to your desires. Our business management program offers an accounting specialization, as well as an equine business specialization within the business management program. I feel as though it would be feasible for you to double major in both here. The riding programs are wonderful too, as well as reasonably-successful riding teams.

The main reason I chose to attend Cazenovia over ALL of the schools listed above was the structure of the business program that allowed me to get a business-based education all while allowing an equine education as well. The programs offered at the schools listed above do NOT compare.

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Hey there! I'm the Lake Erie Grad mentioned in TheBrownHorse's comment. I graduated 2 years ago with a major in Equine Facilities Management. Lake Erie has riding classes that you take as part of the curriculam (added onto your tuition, so it gets steep) and are a requirement for the equine related majors/minors. I finished my riding class requirements sophomore year, but was involved with IHSA all four years so I rode twice a week for that, had lessons with my trainer once a week and leased a horse for 3 of my 4 years in college. I would say I was in the saddle 5-6 days a week and was at the barn a majority of my class time. As far as majors go, Lake Erie is the only other college besides Findlay that offers the Equine Teacher/Trainer major that a lot of my fellow classmates studied. Its a lot more riding classes (you aren't expected to complete them until at least Junior year of college) including a training class where you and another student share the training (and care) of a youngster who either has never been backed or has little to undersaddle time. (I never took this class due to me having zero interest in babies, love them dearly and I respect anyone who did take the classes and works with babies, but I just didn't have the same type of mindset.) I had friends who took those classes and majored in Equine Teacher/Trainer and what I got from them is Lake Erie is very much a hunter/jumper based school. If you are western, dressage or anything besides hunter/jumper, LEC is not the way to go. Findlay has a HUGE western program that Lake Erie is only a fraction of, not trying to discourage you and not saying these disciplines aren't offered, but they are not focused upon or as extensive as the hunter/jumpers. I took my first Dressage classes while at Lake Erie and even went on to design and perform my own freestyle dressage pattern to music I actually mixed and made myself, it was an extremely proud moment of mine while at LEC.

Bottom line, the 4 years I spent at LEC were some of the best and I moved 2000 miles east in order to go there. It has its pros and cons, but any school does. If you want specialized, focused classes with excellent trainers and people who actually know your name because the class sizes do not exceed 15-20 for equine focused classes and 35-40 for gen ed classes, then Lake Erie is an excellent choice. Findlay is a great school. I competed against them for IHSA and their riding facilities are top notch and the horses are amazing there, but honestly, I wouldn't trade my time for LEC for anything.

Good luck, you still have all this year and 6-8 months of your senior year to decide. You'll know once you make the decision which school is right for you.

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Thank you so much for all that information it was just what I was looking for! I appreciate you taking the time to write it out and will defiantly have Lake Erie on my list and will check out Cazenovia.

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