Comet98

Bell And Leg Boots A Must?

Recommended Posts

I've heard so many things from different people and im just getting confused! I'm planning on showing and competing my horse in fairs and fun shows this summer. I want to know whether or not i NEED bell boots for my horse. She doesn't have shoes or anythiing like that so i know thats one of the main reasons people have them! and what type of leg boots would be good for a hardcore going gymkhana horse?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of the trainers at our barn has a lusitano gelding who is also barefoot. she uses them on the front because he has a tendency to hit himself during very fast cow work. i also have a barefoot lusitano gelding who never hits himself no matter what he's doing, so it's not a blanket rule and should be judged by how the horse carries himself.

i also had a TB who had an overreach that was so extreme he'd pull his front shoes off just galloping in a straight line on a semi-regular basis, so i put bells on him. depends on the horse and the activity. have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a video of a dissection of a horse's front leg, showing the pressure the tendon in the back of the leg is under at a full gallop. The vet barely touched that tendon with a scalpel and the tendon snapped like a rubber band. Imagine, even a barefoot horse, over-reaching enough to hit that tendon. After watching that, I ALWAYS put some sort of splint boots on. I've used SMBs, Classic Equine and am now trying Iconoclast. Velcro on SMBs always seemed to rip (maybe they are better now-it's been years). Classic Equine were good, but after about a year, riding 3-5 x a wk, they are losing their rigidity. The Iconoclast I bought right before this crazy ice storm and only have used them 3-5 times. So far, I really like them.

As for bell boots...I've never found no-turns that really don't turn. The cheap rubber ones have worked the best. I use them because I'm trying to teach my horse to spin and he tends to hit his hoof instead of stepping in front.

Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think bellboot best for you and your horse. Bellboot protects his cornet band helps prevent him from throwing a shoe. It also helps the heel from injury. Best of luck for fairs and fun show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I'm working a horse for gaming purposes, I always use bell boots. Simple fact is, I've had plenty of horses strike the front heels with the hind toes. These were always horses who were barefoot trimmed by me, but they were very flexible and very good at turning barrels and poles. Plainly, the better your horse gets with the gymkhana stuff, the higher those chances get of striking. I would definitely use ballistic bell boots. The other poster is right about no bell boot truly being "no turn", but no turns are better than plain bell boots.

Leg boots are optional. I always use them because I feel if my horse will strike a heel, he'll probably strike the leg too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a video of a dissection of a horse's front leg, showing the pressure the tendon in the back of the leg is under at a full gallop. The vet barely touched that tendon with a scalpel and the tendon snapped like a rubber band. Imagine, even a barefoot horse, over-reaching enough to hit that tendon. After watching that, I ALWAYS put some sort of splint boots on. I've used SMBs, Classic Equine and am now trying Iconoclast. Velcro on SMBs always seemed to rip (maybe they are better now-it's been years). Classic Equine were good, but after about a year, riding 3-5 x a wk, they are losing their rigidity. The Iconoclast I bought right before this crazy ice storm and only have used them 3-5 times. So far, I really like them.

As for bell boots...I've never found no-turns that really don't turn. The cheap rubber ones have worked the best. I use them because I'm trying to teach my horse to spin and he tends to hit his hoof instead of stepping in front.

Hope this helps.

I have watched this video it really gives you an eye opening experience on how much stress is put on the horses legs it simply amazing. And i to after watching that video i always put splint boots on and bell boots my horse when i work her

Edited by LovemyBuckskin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree it depends on how competitively you are running, as the chance always exists at speed, that a horse will interfere and hit himself. That is why reiners always wear protective boots on their front legs, as the spin in particular, can have a horse hit himself accidentally

When I gamed horses, I only used front SMB, but those horses were also very broke, as I showed them in reining , western riding , trail and cattle, thus rode mainly off of seat and legs. Horses are going to hit themselves much more likely when someone rides them at speed on a pattern, mainly pulling them at times with strong rein pressure, as the horse really can't set himself up properly. Think of yourself, suddenly jerked sideways, much more likely to make you interfere with your own legs

Not saying all people that run games, esp at upper level, don't get good basics on their horse, and body control, before trying to run a pattern at speed, but I often see it enough at open shows to give merit to some calling it the "jerk and spur class'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The horse is greatly over-extending on a curve, going around a barrel. I saw that video too, and also agree. Only, the bell boots won't protect the area that was cut in the video, so I'd definitely consider leg protection. I say yes to the bell boots and tough/well developed/balanced hooves. If you want a fun filled summer of worry free activity, then prevent, prevent and don't go there. Murphy's Law always rules. Leave the "what if's" and look the other way. Prevent and go confidently. This is with all things for his care. Be sensitive to all his needs and fulfill them. His ongoing good health is your ticket. :smilie:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now