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Baron

Looking To Adopt A Rescue Horse

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I am currently looking at adopting a rescue horse. She is a 5 year old TWH mare. She come from a situation where the farm went under and she was malnurist. She and about 30 other horses ran wild. When she was rescued, she was given a 2 on the body index and had no human contact.

Fast forward 9 months, she has gain some weight, but still needs another 200 lbs. She is 15,2 hh, and currently at a trainer getting 30 days under her. She has decided to that people are good but still a little shy.

Her is the itch.... my wife wants her badly and is laying down guilt on me. She is hoping that I wont like the ride and that I will bow out. Mean while, she is being very... neutral.

Any thoughts?

Baron

Phoenix

post-58395-0-59507600-1388156095.jpg

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i don't quite understand the question. is the issue that you want the horse, but your wife wants her for her own? my husband and i shared a horse for a couple of years before finding him one of his own :confused0024: .

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I think this question is more marriage counselling than horse related. LOL!

You haven't said anything about either you or your wife's riding/horse husbandry experience. Any horse with just 30 days training is extremely green and will remain so for at least one hundred or more rides. That's the equivalent of riding that horse each and every day for more than three months. And those rides need to be under experienced hands to firm up the initial training and keep the horse physically and mentally moving in the right direction. Leaving the horse for 60 to 90 days training might be more appropriate in your situation. It'll still be green and need many more rides but it'll be a little harder (but not impossible) to screw it up with bad hands or little experience. Also spend some time with the trainer and learn what buttons he/she put on the horse.

Once you get the horse back and both of you have the opportunity to get a few rides on it you'll probably answer your own question about whose horse it really is. ~FH

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She actually has 25 years of experience of riding and has said that her 23 year old spotted saddle needs to be retired. The horse we got for her at 2 1/2 years old is still to small for her. So, the reality is that the horse is going to be hers FH.

You are right. This has now become marriage counseling. lol

I guess what I was looking for was advise with a rescue horse and all. This is our first rescue horse and this is going to be a learning experience.

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Rescue horses are rescue horses for a reason... or several reasons. Health issues, training issues, emotional issues and possibly several of each. It's commendable you chose to give one a second chance. Even though you've known her for almost a year, the pressure of training followed by the new pressure of regular riding may uncover some behavior you haven't seen before. So just be patient, work at the horse's speed and not the human clock. Be fair to the horse and reward her trust as it continues to develop. ~FH

Edited by FloridaHorseman

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This horse was rescued and 9 months later it still needs to gain 200 lbs? It doesn't sound like she is being fed properly....after 9 months of being rescued that horse should be at a good weight.

There may be nothing wrong with this horse other then it had not been fed enough since the farm went under. I'm guessing the people didn't have the money to feed their horses or have pasture to sustain them.

Depending on how experienced your wife is and how well the horse does in training.....30 days could very well be good enough. Yes horses are still green after only 30 days but some do real well with that. If I were you I would be spending some time at the trainers to see how well this horse is doing. See if you or your wife are able to spend some time with the horse to see how well you get along with it.

If you do decide to get this horse I wish you all the best with it and hope it's an enjoyable relationship.

Edited by Cindyp

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I own a horse that I adopted through a rescue group. He came into the rescue as a 4-year-old crypt stud that was hardly halter broke. My husband and I adopted him and I have been putting a lot of training into him for him to become my husband's main mount. He rides no differently than any other horse I've trained. Just because a horse is a rescue doesn't mean they will necessarily have any issues down the road.

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I expect that there will be bumps in the road, and we will have to spend lot of time. Currently, we are fixing the front pen at out house and will keep her with our 27 year old quarter horse. We are just going to do some simple riding with her for the first month. Then we will move her to the barn down the road where we keep our other girls.

I work the second shift and my cardiologist has demanded that I loose weight and that playing with my horses on a daily basis would be a step in the right direction. There, there is a round pen and in March/April there will be a riding ring.

That is our plan so far.

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I would do just ground work with her, until she is at the correct weight.

Training a horse under saddle, you neither want them to be under weight for health reasons, but also, you want to train the mind, without the 'advantage' of a more docile attitude due to lack of physical energy

Many under weight horses that have been rescued, appear very calm and docile at first, until they become healthy,and then their true level of training and temperament becomes obvious

Sending her out for training when is is at the correct weight will give you better and true value of that money invested.

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The Rescue organization sent her out. Actually, I wouldn't mind a little edge to the horse, but an absolute jerk not so great..

That being said, we are seeing her this weekend. We are going to work with the trainer, and we have some experience with getting weight on horses who are tough weight gainers. We had a baby who was almost a fescu baby and it was a challenge to get weight on her. It was like I could roll up a dump truck of grain, beat pulp, and rice brand and she would gain a 1 lbs or 2.

We are going to keep her at house for a month or so. We want to have hands on her on a daily basis and we can keep personal track of her weight. We are going to bring the old man (27 year old QH gelding) to be with her. Then we will introduce her to our 3 other girls.

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Well, I went to see Phoenix at the trainers. She is a beautiful horse and will need alot of training and attention on a daily basis. She has some trust issues and is still very wild at heart.

All that being said, this horse is not meant to be with me. She is just needs to much time and will probably need more things than my experience level can provide. It is a real bummer, but I don't think it would be fair to her or me to adopt her. Well, ****.....

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Baron, you are wise to know and admit that a horse might be beyond your experience. It's sad, I'm sure, not getting the horse. You are wiser than me. I probably would have taken the horse and convinced myself I could handle the care. And I probably would be making a mistake.

Ya done good. :smilie:

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Baron, you are wise to know and admit that a horse might be beyond your experience. It's sad, I'm sure, not getting the horse. You are wiser than me. I probably would have taken the horse and convinced myself I could handle the care. And I probably would be making a mistake.

Ya done good. :smilie:

Ditto! Your next horse is out there...it just hasn't found you yet. :smilie:

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