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Berthas mom

Need Help My Horse Coughs

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Hi everyone i hope someone on here can help me and my horse. So my horse coughs when it is dry out, when you watch her it looks like she is having a hard time breathing. If she goes faster than a walk she starts to cough a lot. however she does not cough for about two days after a rain, or when it is humid out, i could ride her all day long. i just would like other peoples advise on what i should do. I have taken her to the vet but she never caughs for him.

thank you so much for taking your time to read this.

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You could be looking at an allergic reaction to say dust, mold, foliage/pollens etc. Is there a pattern of it happening in different seasons than others? Has the horse ever had choke which can trigger coughing and intolerance to dryness?Is the horse stalled for long periods of time? Do you soak this horses feed/hay?Is she dropping weight due to her breathing? Is she running a temperature? Is there any discharge from her nostrils at any point standing or working? These are things that need to be looked at to determine whether it's an allergy or a respiratory problem.My concern would be the latter if this has been an on going problem that recurs and she has no tolerance to exercise at any point. A vet will make a determination due to listening to her lungs, looking at her overall body condition and vital signs.

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it happens at all times of the year. she did have a really bad choke about two years ago but she was coughing before that. she is out in pasture 27/7 , i did soak her hay to see if that was the problem and she still coughed. she is not dropping weight. I'm not sure about her temp,every now and then there is some discharge from her nostrils while she is standing.

I have given her some kind of allergy med. before and she still coughed and had the discharge from her nostrils. This past Labor Day weekend I did a 25 mile endurance ride on her and she did great. We past all the vet checks with no less than a c plus. when ever I have her at the vet and he listens to her lung they sound good.

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Listening to the lungs might not provide enough information to determine if the pathology is infectious. Lab work (including a complete blood count and chemistry) or additional diagnostics might be required. The presence and degree of a fever can sometimes help determine if an infection is bacterial or viral. Also,Another diagnostic test that can be carried out is a tracheal wash.The thing with a ongoing cough is it can lead to alot bigger problems and to really be sure it should be dignosed by a vet to determine cause and what treatments.Hope you can find the cause.

Good luck.

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Hi everyone i hope someone on here can help me and my horse. So my horse coughs when it is dry out, when you watch her it looks like she is having a hard time breathing. If she goes faster than a walk she starts to cough a lot. however she does not cough for about two days after a rain, or when it is humid out, i could ride her all day long. i just would like other peoples advise on what i should do. I have taken her to the vet but she never caughs for him.

thank you so much for taking your time to read this.

We had a similar issue in the fall at our barn. There was a virus that went around to a large number of horses where they developed a dry cough that would be started when horses were worked at anything passed a walk. In some horses it was pretty bad. There wasn't much that we could do other than monitor the horses and wait for it to pass. I think it took about 3 months before the last few horses were able to get rid of it.

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We had a similar issue in the fall at our barn. There was a virus that went around to a large number of horses where they developed a dry cough that would be started when horses were worked at anything passed a walk. In some horses it was pretty bad. There wasn't much that we could do other than monitor the horses and wait for it to pass. I think it took about 3 months before the last few horses were able to get rid of it.

Thank you for your response this has been an on going thing for about three years but it has gotten worse over the last two, since the drought. I did talk to a vet about if horses could get asthma. She said yes and I could get Bertha a inhaler. So think I might look into that and see what my vet says about that.

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Hi I could be heaves especially if worse when dry or Dusty out. U mentioned discharge. Is it a white mucus

discharge? Thats also common.

U have done good things by keeping her out 27/7 and soaking the hay . The dust and dryness will make it worse .

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Agree that it most lightly could be heaves, which in all tense and purpose , is an allergy, usually to dust. The fact that the horse gets better when there is moisture to settle the dust is another good indicator, along with it getting worse over the years, as once a horse is sensitized to something, it takes less and less to trigger a reaction

Once heaves is well established, it is also harder for a horse to expel air, and one can actually see a heave line along their abdomin

Here is some good info on COPD

https://cvm.msu.edu/research/research-labs/equine-pulmonary-laboratory/respiratory-diseases/heaves

here is the info on diagnosis from above artical, but I would read the entire link

Diagnosis

Veterinarians usually diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on history and clinical signs. Since COPD is an allergic response to particles in hay dust, it should be determined how the horse is being housed and the type of feed it is receiving. Information supplied to the veterinarian by the owner or trainer about the onset and nature of clinical signs such as "heaving," coughing, or mucopurulent nasal discharge is also very useful. In addition, the veterinarian will want to know about any history of exercise intolerance.

bob8.JPGThe veterinarian will conduct a complete physical examination and pay particular attention to the lungs. Horses with COPD usually do not have a fever. Abnormal lung sounds, especially wheezing, become more obvious as the disease increases in severity. The veterinarian will look for evidence of a mucopurulent nasal discharge. If there is doubt about the diagnosis, the veterinarian may use endoscopy or bronchoalveolar lavage.

Edited by Smilie

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