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DR650

Do Your Gain After A Ride?

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After a long trail ride I like to give my horse grain. I mix it with wet beet pulp for moisture and cut up apples or carrots. Regardless of the time I arrive back home he is given his grain treat. It has nothing to do with his regular grain schedule.

I use the time to brush him while he eats and if he is going out he is blanketed and sent out. If he is staying in he is still blanketed with a light blanket.

If he is anything like me we like to eat after a work out. Even at the end of a 50 mile endurance race he is grained immediately to get his gut going in the 30 minutes before presentation to the vet.

It does not harm a horse and hopefully makes him feel good.

What do you guys do when returning from a ride?? I do not walk him out to cool him, I would rather slow down before getting home so he can walk himself out. Why rush home just to walk circles???

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I am a big fan of lots of carrots, apples, and a handful of sweet feed,

with a lot of water, tiny bit of electrolytes, and even a bit of applesauce.

This puts water, and sugars into their system, along with being very

comforting for both of us. I also give them this mix just before we travel,

as it gets lots of water in, and mine won't drink in the trailer sometimes.

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I use grain extremely sparingly. My horses don't get grain in their regular diet.

But when I'm hunting or packing, I bring some along for the concentrated calories. Since the horses are working harder and not getting as much grass/hay when they at work all day.

I also carry a little grain in a nose bag, that I can shake and give to my horses on the mountain. During lunch I may let the graze while I eat my lunch. Rather than chase the horses down, I pull out the nose bag and give it a shake or two. My horses have learned to expect it and readily come back to me so I can continue my ride.

I do use soaked beet pulp in the colder weather to help add water to my horses diet, Same is true for days that I know I will be working them hard. After they have drank, I offer them soaked pulp, Which they slurp down. Also a great way to slip a little electrolyte in. Since my horses don't seem to care what I've slipped into their pulp.

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I don't grain at all. I have found that a good hay is all they need. But that being said I do carry nature valley oats and honey bars with me to snack on. One for me and a couple for each of the horses. They really like them. I just trail ride anymore and they are "special needs" horses. So no grain allowed. If I think they need extra in winter I will make them some oatmeal with carrots and/or apples. In summer on hot days and they are standing in the shade and dripping sweat I will give them gatorade.

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I use grain extremely sparingly. My horses don't get grain in their regular diet.

But when I'm hunting or packing, I bring some along for the concentrated calories. Since the horses are working harder and not getting as much grass/hay when they at work all day.

I also carry a little grain in a nose bag, that I can shake and give to my horses on the mountain. During lunch I may let the graze while I eat my lunch. Rather than chase the horses down, I pull out the nose bag and give it a shake or two. My horses have learned to expect it and readily come back to me so I can continue my ride.

I do use soaked beet pulp in the colder weather to help add water to my horses diet, Same is true for days that I know I will be working them hard. After they have drank, I offer them soaked pulp, Which they slurp down. Also a great way to slip a little electrolyte in. Since my horses don't seem to care what I've slipped into their pulp.

I do much the same

I seldom grain my horses, except on trail rides where they have limited time to eat, thus need some concentrated calories

I do feed soaked beet pulp on a regular basis, and can add any supplements needed, such as salt, when traveling, to promote drinking. I used to be always told in the past, that one should feed horses hay before grain, to slow down digestion, but apparently that is not considered true any longer. The reason now given for feeding hay first, is that a horse will be less likely to bolt their grain when they are somewhat full, thus it lessens the danger of choke

If I grain after a trail ride, it is a few hours after the horses have eaten their hay

http://www.successful-horse-training-and-care.com/hay-for-horses.html

50 to 75 % of our trail rides are done at a walk, so I don't need to cool horses down by walking them, after we reach camp

Depending on the temp, I will blanket them immediately after brushing, or wait until bed time

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Since most of my trail rides are 40-80 miles away and I go for the whole day, I hang hay bags in the trailer. They get grain and water before I load them, then they eat on the way.

They get to graze through out the day on the ride, while I eat lunch and sometimes just stopping to enjoy the views.

After our ride they get to cool down and get water back at the trailer. Then they eat hay all the way home.

Back home they get grain and then they always go drink more water before starting on their hay, or heading up to the pasture for the night.

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I don't feed a traditional "grain" since my Foxtrotter has a high percentage of Morgan.

She gets her supplements & trace minerals in the am & pm along with orchard grass hay.

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I don't feed a traditional "grain" since my Foxtrotter has a high percentage of Morgan.

She gets her supplements & trace minerals in the am & pm along with orchard grass hay.

Why does it make a difference if it is Morgan or not. We have a pure bred right beside mine and he gets his grain the same as everyone else.

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Why does it make a difference if it is Morgan or not. We have a pure bred right beside mine and he gets his grain the same as everyone else.

Probably because Morgans are prone to being easy keepers that can go on to becoming IR Traditional grains, as in grains, not some pre mixed bag of feed, are concentrated in NSC

I also prefer to feed cool calories, even to my horses that have no issues with any metabolic concerns

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Probably because Morgans are prone to being easy keepers that can go on to becoming IR Traditional grains, as in grains, not some pre mixed bag of feed, are concentrated in NSC

I also prefer to feed cool calories, even to my horses that have no issues with any metabolic concerns

Exactly, Sienna is an "Easy Keeper" and I'm one of those people who would rather be safe than sorry when it comes to the health of my horse.

When I got her she was extremely fat because she figured out if she charged with her ears back and a hostile look in her eye at the girl who was pushing a cart of hay and grain through the pasture. The girl would run away from the cart so Sienna could gobble up all the hay and grain she wanted. If she wants to eat now, she has to stand five feet back from the food barrel and wait with ears pricked forward. Until I give her the cue to come forward to eat. Ears laid back or pushy behavior earns her extra time away from the food. She's a smart horse and has perfected the "Butter wouldn't melt in my mouth!" look. :flirt:

When I transition a horse from one feed to another I do it slowly over a minimum of 10 days. I've had people shake their heads when I suggest a very slow change when they are switching feeds.

I don't care.

In an entire life of horse ownership (40+ years) we had 1 Shetland pony colic when my little sister let it into the feed room and an opened aluminum can with a new 50 pound bag of sweet feed in it. I had the vet on his way the instant I found Diamond eating his way to the bottom of the grain. He was able to tube Diamond and pump him full of oil within fifteen minutes and we soaked his legs in icy cold water for hours to stave off any heat or founder (old cowboy trick that seemed to work). There wasn't any repercussions from his pig-out. Diamond got a scant palm full of grain at night during the winter nights. So that open barrel must have seemed like Pony Heaven.

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We do not grain regularly either. Mine stay fat on pasture. We do carry sweet feed, usually Horse and Mule, when traveling and use it to create energy when the animals need to come back to us when hobbled on the trail!

We usually feed cubed or large pelleted alfalfa when traveling and can soak it if need be. Mine are seasoned travelers so I rarely have trouble with one not eating or drinking enough thankfully.

Our trail rides are also usually at a walk so no cool outs needed. When we are working cattle, they get to walk back to the ranch house or trailer and can cool out that way if they have gotten heated while chasing the cattle.

No blankets unless one is ill.

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