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wisecomp

Rodeo: Yay Or Nay?

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I know a horse can be trained whatever way. But most horses are bred to excel in a specific sport. I don't know about to many cutting bred horses doing high level dressage.

Many horse sports are intense and injury will happen. It's what happens when you put living animals into a sport.

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I know of no one that thinks an animal should be hurt. *smh*

Just because a calf or a horse is roped, it doesn't automatically mean it's being hurt. I've been to hundreds of rodeos, I've seen literally thousands of calves being roped between rodeos and brandings and have seen 1 injury, and it was at a branding, and it was minor and the calf was fine in a little while (was choked). I saw 1 bucking horse step in a bad spot in an arena and break it's leg -- freak accident. Those are the only injuries I have ever seen.

See, for the rancher AND the stock contractor, the livestock IS their livelihood, no different than a dairy cow or anything else. EVERY precaution is taken to ensure the health and well being of the animals being used for either the sport (rodeo) or on the ranch.

We're branding calves this weekend, our first branding of the year. It will be our biggest also, around 350 calves. That's a lot more calves than half a dozen rodeo's combined will go through. I'll let you know how many we manage to kill or maim ... :unsure:

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Let us know how that goes, Andi. Be careful, your obese horses may break a sweat. Could be detrimental to their health. Pfft.

I wasn't implying that rodeos hurt animals. Maybe they are uncomfortable? But it isn't gonna kill them (in most cases :/)

I hope to see a lot more rodeos this year.

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Let us know how that goes, Andi. Be careful, your obese horses may break a sweat. Could be detrimental to their health. Pfft.

I wasn't implying that rodeos hurt animals. Maybe they are uncomfortable? But it isn't gonna kill them (in most cases :/)

I hope to see a lot more rodeos this year.

I know you weren't implying it but it was implied elsewhere on this thread.

And yeah, my poor horses -- won't be able to tell them from the fat cows, right? :indifferent:

eta: Yeah, uncomfortable I can agree with. and some amount of pain, I'm sure. But nothing that is going to be permanent or life scarring.

Edited by Andi

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Andi? I wasn't implying rodeo hurt animals, just, I don't like to SEE the calves roped and, jerked....I don't know if roping hurts, or not, it doesn't LOOK like it, the way they get right up and trot off.....kind of even looks like, they're thinking..." DAMM, what just happened"!

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Andi? I wasn't implying rodeo hurt animals, just, I don't like to SEE the calves roped and, jerked....I don't know if roping hurts, or not, it doesn't LOOK like it, the way they get right up and trot off.....kind of even looks like, they're thinking..." DAMM, what just happened"!

Relax equi -- twasn't you neither ...

I don't like seeing them jerked down either. And good ropers try not to do that but timed events are timed events. I do have to say though, at a branding, you want to get that calf to the fire, down on the ground, both legs tied, branded, vaccinated and ear marked, castrated if need be as fast as possible. The quicker you get it done, the less stress on the calf and the less likely the ground crew is going to get stomped by a mad mama cow! LOL

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I know you weren't implying it but it was implied elsewhere on this thread.

And yeah, my poor horses -- won't be able to tell them from the fat cows, right? :indifferent:

eta: Yeah, uncomfortable I can agree with. and some amount of pain, I'm sure. But nothing that is going to be permanent or life scarring.

Ever had a ruptured disk? Any other sort of back or neck trauma? Sometimes it is not immediately seen, especially in animals that a lot of times have to hide they are hurt, otherwise, they get eaten.

If anyone knows basic anatomy and bone structures- they also know that the spine and neck are the most vulnerable areas in ANY mammal- whether it be human or cow. Jerking around on the neck like that is not healthy for any animal... anyone with common sense would know that.... but maybe some just like to play dumb because they get enjoyment out of that sport.

And did you not read my first post? I said outside of a WORKING RANCH, roping and jerking around on young, developing baby calves is really not necessary at all, especially just for bragging rights so they feel like big tough men.

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My oldest brother worked several years for a rodeo stock contractor. Those animals are better cared for than most peoples' children.

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I have plenty of common sense and, I know a great deal about anatomy. :grin:

Edited by equicrzy

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How often, would you say, it occurs, a calf gets roped, multiple times, during a rodeo? Calves are drawn, like the bucking horses and bulls, aren't they?

So, isn't there a good chance, a calf might get roped just once?

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Usually just once, like a steer gets bulldogged once, and a bucking horse is ridden once. These animals tend to "work" about 3 minutes or less a WEEK! *I* want that job!

Edited by ozland

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And did you not read my first post? I said outside of a WORKING RANCH, roping and jerking around on young, developing baby calves is really not necessary at all, especially just for bragging rights so they feel like big tough men.

There isn't much difference calf roping is an event in different rodeos.....

the calf isn't jerked by the rider.....read below...

In The Arena

Before each run, a calf is loaded into the chute and a small piece of breakaway rope is fastened around its neck. The cowboy enters the box and backs his horse into the corner as the chute workers stretch a rope barrier across the chute entrance. The cowboy grabs his rope, readies his horse, and signals the chute worker to open the chute. As the calf runs forward, the barrier pops and the cowboy follows the calf. If the horse leaves the box before the barrier goes down, a 10-second penalty is added to his final time. The cowboy tosses his rope around the calf's neck and jumps off his horse as the animal comes to a stop. He runs down the rope, flanks the calf and lays her over on her side. He then pulls three of her legs together and wraps the pigging string around her legs, tying a knot to hold the string firm. He raises his hands to signal the end of his run, and the judge waits for a count of six seconds to see if the calf gets up before declaring an official time. If the calf slips her legs out of the rope or stands up, the cowboy earns a no score.

Rules and Regulations

There are a number of rules and regulations for this sport. Many are standard between governing rodeo associations, but slight variances are common. Excessive roughness including dragging or jerking the calf at the end of the rope may incur fines, time penalties or disqualification. If the cowboy breaks through his barrier and does not give the calf enough of a head start, a time penalty is usually added. If the rope used to tie the calf's legs comes undone before the cowboy is remounted and slack is given to the calf, the run is typically disqualified.

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I know there are horses bred that like to buck, and many rodeo stock animals are well cared for.

What I find a bit of a conflict , is ,in the training discussions most people here agree that we have learned better way to start horses then to buck and spur them out, and yet rodeo more or less glorifies that past tradition, and as de picted in that Video that DR650 posted on the colt starting thread most here objected to strongly

To me, some rodeo events are grey areas, just like many training methods used in some disciplines I see the tradition and working cowboys wanting to compete, but even in the good ole days, flank straps weren't applied to encourage an animal to buck, scores weren't based on how high you spurred that animal with each buck. I don't know, the horse person sees a conflict in using a flank strap to make a horse buck, then spurring him, which should mean punishment for bucking, or do we just accept that these horses are bred to buck, so common horse handling principles goes out the window?

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Smilie, yes, the rodeo horses are BRED to buck, from stock that likes to buck. There really ARE horses that would rather buck no matter what training was attempted. Most of them don't NEED the flank straps, which, by the way, are there more as a cue than for any real use, as many of the bucking horses have more than one job, such as also being a roping horse, or a bulldogging horse.

The flank strap is THERE, yes, but it causes no more harm than your saddle girth. And before we go to the whole "squeeze the genitals" thing, just look closer please. It doesn't go there. (And how would THAT work on the mares, anyway?)

Spurs? Ever see a rodeo horse marked by them? Not allowed.

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I just find rodeos rather boring..just not my thing.

The Born to Buck program is what you all are thinking about.

Some contractors are not good people and the good ones do not try and rid the rodeo of them so kinda iffy on the Better cared for thing some don't some do.

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There are always a few "bad apples" in just about anything humans attempt. Should we shoot the good ones along with them?

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Smilie, yes, the rodeo horses are BRED to buck, from stock that likes to buck. There really ARE horses that would rather buck no matter what training was attempted. Most of them don't NEED the flank straps, which, by the way, are there more as a cue than for any real use, as many of the bucking horses have more than one job, such as also being a roping horse, or a bulldogging horse.

The flank strap is THERE, yes, but it causes no more harm than your saddle girth. And before we go to the whole "squeeze the genitals" thing, just look closer please. It doesn't go there. (And how would THAT work on the mares, anyway?)

Spurs? Ever see a rodeo horse marked by them? Not allowed.

Bucking horses used as roping and bull dogging horses?? I am not doubting what you are saying without further research, but that sounds a bit much to me, as I can't imagine someone with a well broke roping horse, or a bull dogging horse, letting that horse be used as a bucking horse!

As for that flank strap, it certainly will make a horse buck, or at least buck harder, and the reason , that if you ride with aback cinch, you have a hobble strap that attaches it to your front cinch, to prevent that back cinch from sliding back into the flank area, and cause that horse to buck

I hope you can give me a link to where a good roping horse doubles as a bucking horse!!! I know that those rope horses at upper end sell for 100 grand, so I really, really can't see such a horse being purposely made to buck.

Could be wrong, as there is always something new to learn, but the bucking horses I know of, are never broke, or are saddle horses that have gone bad, deciding to buck rather than work. If they are good enough, they wind up as bucking horses, rather than in a dog food can looking out!

Never said anything about squeezing the genitals, as I have bred horse long enough so that I'm not ignorant of conformation That straps flanks a horse. Ever ridden a saddle horse where that back cinch is allowed to migrate to the flank area? Even a well broke horse will object!

Bucking stock is supplied by a stock contractor, and good rope horses or bull dogging horses, are equine athletes, well trained like any other equine athlete in the various disciplines. The ropers I know, would no more allow their good rope horse to be used as abronc, than I would one of my show horses!!!!

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Darn, my post got lost!!! Her goes again.

Yes, I certainly know that there are horses bred specifically as they like to buck, however, a good rope or bull dogging horse, used to double as a bucking horse???? I'm not doubting you, as all things are possible, but that makes neither sense to me, nor relates to anything I know. If you have some sort of link to prove that, I would certainly be interested.

Good rope horses that I know, ones that ar successful at National Finals Rodeo level, are worth 100 k and up, ditto for a good bull dogging horse that can put the cowboy in the money.; Many bull dog hazing horses earn money being loaned out to other bull doggers

Those cowboys would no more loan their good roping or bull dogging horse to be used in a bucking string, anymore than I would one of my show horses!!!!

As for that flank strap, I am well aware it is not in the genital area, having raised horses for many years, and not exactly new to horse conformation! It is in the flank area though, and when you ride with aback cinch, you also have a hobble strap to connect that back cinch to the front cinch and thus prevent it from sliding into the flank area. Even a well broke saddle horse will object if that happens!

Bucking stock is supplied by a stock contractor. Those horses are never broke, or also consist of saddle horses that decided to buck, instead or work. If the latter are good enough, they get a second career as a bucking horse, instead of winding up in acan of dog food looking out

Roping horses and bull dogging horses are raised to be athletes like in any other discipline, and are privately owned and well trained. Nobody in his right mind would set up a situation to make such a horse buck!

Life is strange, and maybe it happens where you live, but until proven otherwise, I just can't believe that happens. Who on earth would set there well trained and valuable horse up to be used as a bronc!!!!!!

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Well, post # 1 arrived from cyber space, so please excuse any repetition!

her is a history of stock contractors , that supply the rough stock to rodeos (not someone's valuable saddle horse!!! )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_contractor

Some history, that shows rodeo is being forced to clean up its act, and was not always humane

The practice of shocking animals in the cute, to encourage bucking, is no longer legal in many States

Over the years states imposed regulation upon certain techniques and tools used in rodeos.[11] In 2000, California became the first state to prohibit the use of cattle prods on animals in the chute.[11] The city of Pittsburgh prohibited the use of flank straps as well as prods or shocking devices, wire tie-downs, and sharpened or fixed spurs or rowels at rodeos or rodeo-related events. Some other cities and states have passed similar prohibitions.[14] Under PRCA guidelines, electric prods may not deliver a shock stronger than can be produced from two D batteries.[15] Prods are allowed as long as the situation requires them to protect the people or the animals.[11]

Flank strap controversy

A "flank strap" (or, "bucking strap") is used to encourage the horse to kick out straighter and higher when it bucks. The flank strap is about 4 inches wide, is usually covered in sheepskin or neoprene and fastens behind the widest part of the abdomen. Flank straps that hurt the horse are not allowed by rodeo rules in the United States.[10][16]

However, a bucking strap has to be an incentive, not a prod, or the horse will quickly sour and refuse to work. A horse in pain will become sullen and not buck very well,[2][4] and harm to the genitalia is anatomically impossible because the stifle joint of the hind leg limits how far back a flank strap can be attached.[4][10]

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has stated that burrs and other irritants are at times placed under the flank strap and that improperly used flank straps can cause open wounds and burns if the hair is rubbed off and the skin i

Edited by Smilie

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I can't speak for rodeos elsewhere, but the bucking horses our stock contractors use aren't used for anything else. Saddle bronc horses are strictly that, as are bareback bronc horses. Most are big, strong and heavy boned with some draft in them, and due to their being bred specifically to buck, using them as saddle horses in other events would defeat the purpose. I've heard of some bucking horses going on to become riding horses after they're retired from rodeo, but I don't think it's the norm.

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Smilie, yes, the rodeo horses are BRED to buck, from stock that likes to buck. There really ARE horses that would rather buck no matter what training was attempted. Most of them don't NEED the flank straps, which, by the way, are there more as a cue than for any real use, as many of the bucking horses have more than one job, such as also being a roping horse, or a bulldogging horse.

The flank strap is THERE, yes, but it causes no more harm than your saddle girth. And before we go to the whole "squeeze the genitals" thing, just look closer please. It doesn't go there. (And how would THAT work on the mares, anyway?)

Spurs? Ever see a rodeo horse marked by them? Not allowed.

You are contradicting yourself. In one statement, you say the bucking horses do not buck because of any the equipment put on them because they are bred to buck and would buck regardless. Then in another, you say that they have other jobs as well? If the equipment doesn't make them buck because they are born to buck, how in the heck are they doing any other jobs such as being a roping horse???

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Yay for well run rodeos that take excellent care for their animals. Nay for those who don't.

I do have to say that calf roping is probably my least favorite event. I see the tradition in it but watching it makes me cringe occasionally. Then I remember these animals will most likely be a steak on my plate sometime soon and figure I can't judge.

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I like a good rodeo, but a poor one can put me to sleep, & wished I had spent my money else where. By poor I mean lack of real competitive talent. We don't have much for ranch rodeo in our area, but I think I could enjoy watching real cowboys that make their living on horseback. PD

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OMG! I love rodeos!!!!!! We have our own rodeo grounds here.. cows and everything.. calf ridng, sheep riding, dobbing, etc everything...

Hubby and I used to be the cow/steer/roper pusher in the gates where they came back to get the ropes removed from their horns.. Had to be pretty carefull around those horns..the little turkeys would try and actually gore you.. NOw that I'm retired I'm thinking about helping out again and getting more involved with the association.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/104925432918703/#!/Soldotnaequestrianassociation

Its small but very special...

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Spurs, straps, and horse welfare

The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association takes the welfare of all animals used in PRCA sanctioned events seriously, and the bucking horses are no exception.

Many questions often arise about the equipment used on bucking horses. Riders in both the saddle bronc and bareback riding use spurs while riding. All spurs used in these events must be dulled and the rowels (the wheel-type devices on the end of the spur) must be able to roll along the animal’s thick hide; no locked rowels are allowed. Riders are disqualified if their spurs are too sharp of if the animal is injured in any way due to the rider’s actions.

The flank strap is used in bucking events to encourage a bucking horse to kick higher. The flank strap must be lined by fleece or neoprene and placed loosely around the flank area of the horse, just in front of the back legs. To pull a flank strap tightly would restrict or stop the motion of the animals, quite the opposite of what is asked of rodeo bucking horses. Horse flank straps are equipped with a quick release mechanism that allows the rodeo pickup men to release the strap when the ride concludes. Veterinarians familiar with rodeo events and equipment have testified that the flank strap does not injure or cause pain to the animal.

Overall, the animal welfare program employed by the PRCA is extensive. More than 60 rules are in place to govern the care and handling of livestock at PRCA rodeos. Professional judges enforce these rules and inspect all livestock before a competition; if any animal is not healthy and fit, that animal will not compete. PRCA rules also require a veterinarian on-site. These on-site, independent veterinarians are allowed by PRCA to conduct surveys to calculate the percentage of the rate of injury to livestock competing at PRCA rodeos. The latest survey was conducted at 57 rodeos during the 2000 PRCA rodeo season. Out of 71,743 animal exposures, 38 injuries occurred. This calculates to a rate of injury of .00052, or five-hundredths of one percent.

As the sport of rodeo continues to grow in popularity, the care of the livestock involved will be under greater scrutiny. The PRCA and other rodeo associations will continue to make the welfare of all rodeo livestock an important part of the rodeo industry.

Not all horses bred for bucking have the inclination to buck, therefore become a riding horse as explained blow.

He has a breeding program that is designed to provide him with an ongoing supply of buckers. The plan is to breed stallions that buck to mares which also buck. However, he says, it is not overly successful. Many of the horses he raises aren't interested in bucking and wind up being someone's riding horse. Vold breeds and raises between 75 and 100 foals each year from bucking mares and/or by bucking stallions.

http://www.friendsofrodeo.com/help7.html

Edited by Ann Wheeler

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You are contradicting yourself. In one statement, you say the bucking horses do not buck because of any the equipment put on them because they are bred to buck and would buck regardless. Then in another, you say that they have other jobs as well? If the equipment doesn't make them buck because they are born to buck, how in the heck are they doing any other jobs such as being a roping horse???

Why does a rein or leg pressure cause a horse to turn? It's a CUE! And while I agree it isn't the norm, it DOES happen that a horse can be trained to do 2 different jobs, using different CUES! It's certainly no contradiction to understand some horses learn more things than others, just lie some people. NOWHERE did I say it was true of ALL horses.

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Not all horses bred for bucking have the inclination to buck, therefore become a riding horse as explained blow.

Not all horses bred to race can run, either.

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How often, would you say, it occurs, a calf gets roped, multiple times, during a rodeo? Calves are drawn, like the bucking horses and bulls, aren't they?

So, isn't there a good chance, a calf might get roped just once?

As a rule, calves are only roped 2-3 times in their lives. They learn to stop, stall, duck, dodge, etc. after about the 3rd or 4th time being roped and so they just aren't used for long. That's for calf roping. For team roping, most people use Corriente steers and they are trained to break out of the chute, run a straight line and get headed and heeled. They might get roped 2-3 times in a weekend, a couple times a month, for the duration of rodeo season. The rest of the time, they eat, sleep and poop.

Calves also aren't jerked down -- generally that DQ's the rider. Or at least adds enough time that they don't get a check.

Usually just once, like a steer gets bulldogged once, and a bucking horse is ridden once. These animals tend to "work" about 3 minutes or less a WEEK! *I* want that job!

Yeah, like most animals, they learn and once they learn to avoid the rope or the bulldogger, they are not used any more.

I know there are horses bred that like to buck, and many rodeo stock animals are well cared for.

What I find a bit of a conflict , is ,in the training discussions most people here agree that we have learned better way to start horses then to buck and spur them out, and yet rodeo more or less glorifies that past tradition, and as de picted in that Video that DR650 posted on the colt starting thread most here objected to strongly

To me, some rodeo events are grey areas, just like many training methods used in some disciplines I see the tradition and working cowboys wanting to compete, but even in the good ole days, flank straps weren't applied to encourage an animal to buck, scores weren't based on how high you spurred that animal with each buck. I don't know, the horse person sees a conflict in using a flank strap to make a horse buck, then spurring him, which should mean punishment for bucking, or do we just accept that these horses are bred to buck, so common horse handling principles goes out the window?

There are different things to address here: for one, the spurs used. They can't be fixed, they can't make a mark on the horse and it's meant for timing and not for holding on. The flank strap is a cue; it encourages the horse to snap it's back feet, nothing more. Horses that like to buck, will buck without a flank strap. It's just used in 99% of the cases to get a stronger kick, that snap. The flank doesn't make the horse buck.

5287_10201174380707890_50411034_n.jpg

923228_10201174725396507_175610093_n.jpg

431954_10201175541576911_575057101_n.jpg

Smilie, yes, the rodeo horses are BRED to buck, from stock that likes to buck. There really ARE horses that would rather buck no matter what training was attempted. Most of them don't NEED the flank straps, which, by the way, are there more as a cue than for any real use, as many of the bucking horses have more than one job, such as also being a roping horse, or a bulldogging horse.

The flank strap is THERE, yes, but it causes no more harm than your saddle girth. And before we go to the whole "squeeze the genitals" thing, just look closer please. It doesn't go there. (And how would THAT work on the mares, anyway?)

Spurs? Ever see a rodeo horse marked by them? Not allowed.

Sometimes, a bucking horse quits bucking. Then they go on to be a saddle horse. Sometimes, a bucking horse will double as a pickup horse. The flank strap and the bucking saddle cues them which job is which (and the chute, of course). My BF was at a rodeo once and the pickup rider stripped his saddle off his horse, tossed it up on the fence, led his horse into the bucking chute, they put the bucking rigging and flank strap on it, the rider climbed on, they came out and went on to an 80-something point ride, pulled the flank strap, stripped his saddle off and he finished the rodeo as a pickup horse. It's not common but it happens.

I just find rodeos rather boring..just not my thing.

The Born to Buck program is what you all are thinking about.

Some contractors are not good people and the good ones do not try and rid the rodeo of them so kinda iffy on the Better cared for thing some don't some do.

Actually, that's not entirely true; bad contractors don't get asked back to good rodeos. And any stock contractor that doesn't take good care of his stock, doesn't make any money or stay in business long.

Well, post # 1 arrived from cyber space, so please excuse any repetition!

her is a history of stock contractors , that supply the rough stock to rodeos (not someone's valuable saddle horse!!! )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_contractor

Some history, that shows rodeo is being forced to clean up its act, and was not always humane

The practice of shocking animals in the cute, to encourage bucking, is no longer legal in many States

Over the years states imposed regulation upon certain techniques and tools used in rodeos.[11] In 2000, California became the first state to prohibit the use of cattle prods on animals in the chute.[11] The city of Pittsburgh prohibited the use of flank straps as well as prods or shocking devices, wire tie-downs, and sharpened or fixed spurs or rowels at rodeos or rodeo-related events. Some other cities and states have passed similar prohibitions.[14] Under PRCA guidelines, electric prods may not deliver a shock stronger than can be produced from two D batteries.[15] Prods are allowed as long as the situation requires them to protect the people or the animals.[11]

Flank strap controversy

A "flank strap" (or, "bucking strap") is used to encourage the horse to kick out straighter and higher when it bucks. The flank strap is about 4 inches wide, is usually covered in sheepskin or neoprene and fastens behind the widest part of the abdomen. Flank straps that hurt the horse are not allowed by rodeo rules in the United States.[10][16]

However, a bucking strap has to be an incentive, not a prod, or the horse will quickly sour and refuse to work. A horse in pain will become sullen and not buck very well,[2][4] and harm to the genitalia is anatomically impossible because the stifle joint of the hind leg limits how far back a flank strap can be attached.[4][10]

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has stated that burrs and other irritants are at times placed under the flank strap and that improperly used flank straps can cause open wounds and burns if the hair is rubbed off and the skin i

I call bull on most of this. For one, how is hitting the horse with a cattle prod in the chute going to encourage bucking? Simple, it won't. But if a horse sulls up going up the alley or into the chute, yes, it might get smacked with a whip or paddle or zapped with the prod. It's not like it's extremely painful ... I don't think there's a ranch kid out there that hasn't been hit with a cattle prod and our skin is much thinner.

And it's crap about the burrs or irritants that PETA spews about. A horse in pain will not buck consistently or correctly. PETA and SHARK just hate rodeo and want it stopped.

That's not to say there are NOT jerks out there who abuse the stock because there are. But they are few and far between and not in the good rodeos, the reputable ones.

Why does a rein or leg pressure cause a horse to turn? It's a CUE! And while I agree it isn't the norm, it DOES happen that a horse can be trained to do 2 different jobs, using different CUES! It's certainly no contradiction to understand some horses learn more things than others, just lie some people. NOWHERE did I say it was true of ALL horses.

This horse's name is "Californios"; he's well bred, registered AQHA, started life as a ranch horse. The cowboys just got tired of trying to stay on him for the first 30 minutes every morning for the first 2-3 YEARS of his riding life. He's been the WSRRA bucking horse of the year since changing careers. He enjoys bucking. A lot.

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Imagine trying to ride that every day? He does it with or without the flank strap. He's one heck of a bucker!

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One of the best cutters I ever rode was like that. Bucked hard a full minute every time you saddled him, then went to work just like he was supposed to. We called him Mike Hammer.

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I did mention that some saddle horses that went 'bad', became good bucking stock, as a new and chosen career for them. Those that were just rank saddle horses , but not very talented buckers, became dog food instead

I am well aware of people that raise bucking stock, as I do live near Calgary! Bucking stock comes from lines of horses that like to buck, and are proven good at it, unlike saddle horses, where we select against a desire to buck!

What I don't agree with, is that ropers and bull doggers allow their well trained horses to be used as bucking stock, as Ozland claimed. Makes absolutely no sense to purposely have your saddle horse buck with a rider

I prefer Ranch horse type Competitions, but certainly don't wish to dictate fun for others. If they enjoy a good rodeo, then I have no problem with it, as long as it is well run and the animals are cared for properly

I am glad that horse tripping and tailing of cattle is not longer approved, north of the Mexican boarder

Every discipline /event has people in them, that gives a negative impression to those outside of it, so that the 'good apples' have to dis prove those stereotypes Rodeo is no different

At least some bull riders are starting to wear helmets, but I don't see where that event fits into past 'tradition!

The original question was , Rodeo, yea or nay?'

I guess a third choice would be 'indifferent', and just place me there!

Edited by Smilie

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