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MiSSxZURi

Castration - Does It Affect Growth And End Result Size Or Doesn't It?

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Some say it's a myth and others don't and I'm wondering what y'all believe. Does gelding a horse 'too soon' prevent it from reaching full physical potential? Body mass? Or do they actually grow taller if gelded BEFORE puberty? Or what's the dealio on how to decide when to geld your boys?

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I say, it's a myth. A horse is going to be as big as it is, no matter if/when it's gelded....JMO..

I have no idea , when it come to the best time to geld, I'd say, though, around a year...?

Lotta help, huh? LOL!

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Its well known that testosterone (or estrogen) is necessary for closure of the growth plates. By early castration and denying those hormones, yes, long bone growth will continue longer with the potential for taller, lankier results. Part of the reason why there is such a discussion going on about pre-pubertal castration in large breed dogs currently. Current thought is that it increases the rate of hip dysplasia and cruciate ligament ruptures as the physics of the pelvic limbs are altered. Ultimately, it depends on what body type you want the animal to have. If you want a longer, lankier type, cut 'em early. If you want a stockier build, cut 'em late.

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Its well known that testosterone (or estrogen) is necessary for closure of the growth plates. By early castration and denying those hormones, yes, long bone growth will continue longer with the potential for taller, lankier results. Part of the reason why there is such a discussion going on about pre-pubertal castration in large breed dogs currently. Current thought is that it increases the rate of hip dysplasia and cruciate ligament ruptures as the physics of the pelvic limbs are altered. Ultimately, it depends on what body type you want the animal to have. If you want a longer, lankier type, cut 'em early. If you want a stockier build, cut 'em late.

Exactly. Gelding a horse as a yearling, will allow those growth plates to stay open longer. Of course, genetics are the major influence on mature height, but a horse gelded as a yearling will be taller then the same horse allowed to mature as a stallion.

Gelding as a yearling prevents the development of secondary sex characteristics, that you DON"T want, like a cresty neck and thick jowels

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Well I like tall horses but I like big, tall horses. Porportionate for sure and the word 'lanky' has me wondering if it's worth it lol.

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Early = prior to puberty (I'd say before 2 years old)

Late = after puberty and onset of secondary sexual characteristics

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JMO, but aside from whats been said about growth, I like to geld between 6 months to a year if they have dropped. Just seems a whole lot easier when it comes to their mindset.Meant to add as far them being distracted as much from hormones.

Edited by Floridacracker

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The decision about when to geld is, or should be, about your ability to maintain an intact male. Can you keep him separate from any females until gelded? Can you keep him socialized while keeping him and his buddies safe? Do you need to let him mature enough to tell what he is going to be at maturity? Do you have the expience to handle a young stallion and not let him get away with any young stallion antics?

I have searched and searched for legitimate information regarding castration and growth. I have found a few studies that indicate, as CVM stated, that gelding prior to puberty should allow for more long bone growth or more height. It is difficult to prove though as the same animal cannot be allowed to grow intact and then allowed to grow again after catrated young! It does make sense though that they would grow for a longer period without the presence of hormones to cloe the growth plates.

It has been my experience that secondary sexual charateristics, like a heavier jowl, will diminish once a stallion is gelded. Even older stallions, 10+ years of age, will lose some of that stallion "thickness" once gelded.

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Colts on my grandparents farm were never gelded right away, unless they started acting studly; once that happened they were gelded.

My colt was gelded at six months and about a week after he mounted his dam.

This was back in the late sixties when my horses ran on nearly 100 acres and only got a handful of oats to keep them coming to the barn at night.

By the time that Arab/Saddlebred was done growing, he was taller than both his sire and his dam, and the toughest hardiest trail horse I have ever owned.

I had that horse 29 years until I was forced to lay him to rest with cancer.

Edited by gaitinalong

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