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MiSSxZURi

Can Someone Tell Me What Kind Of Cat I Have?

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After seeing all the kitty posts that go by I can't take it anymore. There are so many knowledgeable people here and somebody's gotta be able to tell me what my beloved Blueberry is! She's about 9 and we adopted her in February. Excuse the Instagram filters but here she is. Thank you for trying!

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For good measure ;)

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Although, I also have a blue eyed cat who is not a Siamese, she's Tonkinese and Ragdoll cross. Her coloring suggests she's a blue point.

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She also has a Puff ball instead of a tail, it was docked when she was born, because it was very crooked.

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She's a cutie! I love wide eyes in a round face, kinda like an owl-face. Totally adorbs.

First, she carries two copies of the gene that causes the haircoat to dilute (black to gray, orange to peach), which is why she is gray-ish.

Next, she is pointed, so she carries 2 copies of the pointed gene the Siamese breeds carry.

Finally, all cats are tabby cats but it takes the agouti gene (same one that makes black-based horses bay or buckskin) to make the striped markings stand out. Typically, a black-based cat w/out agouti is solid black, or gray if they are dilute, and you can only see the tabby markings in certain slants of light. Because her stripes are a bit more prominent ... I'm going to lean towards "yes" and say she does have agouti .... which would make her ....

.... a dilute Lynx Point!

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You have a lot of cat knowledge, Heidi.

I used to, well, I still know quite a bit, but nothing about the scientifics, like you.

Actually, I don't see how you come to the conclusion, lynx point, I see no distinct points, unless, that's where the, dilute part comes into play?

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Equi, for me, it was going back and looking at the first photo several times; it shows a marked difference between her face mask and ears against her neck, chest and shoulder color.

When pointed cats (the Siamese-influenced breeds) are older, their body colors typically darken and their points can blend into their bodies, especially their legs and tail. Her being dilute shows me juuuuusssst a bit more variation between her points and her body color so that is why I decided to lean towards lynx point. I'm also not 100% certain about Lynx point but I lean more towards it, than away from it. Traditionally a lynx point has *very* defined stripes on their foreheads, legs and tail .... but again I return to her dilute coloring which could mute the expression of the stripes and her darker body coloring having an influence, too. An average black cat with two dilute genes will be gray; the Russian Blue is an excellent example of a cat who doesn't express the tabby pattern because there is no agouti gene present.

I keep returning to the dilute factor influencing the expression of her overall pointed color and visibility of the tabby stripes I can see and that is why I went with Lynx point.

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I'd definitely call Monkey a Lynx Point, too. Is his body color on the tan/brown-ish side? If so, perhaps not dilute. Do you have another pic of him in brighter lighting?

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Heidi, you certainly do analyze it! Makes my head hurt! Haha!

The vet at the Humane Society, where I worked, was like that, she went into great detail when teaching us cat colors.

I still remember the woman who brought in her cat for spaying, I said, " oh, she's a flame point". To which she replied, "no, she's a Siamese". Spent 10 minutes trying to explain it and, couldn't get my point across, she just kept insisting her cat was not a flame point, but, a Siamese.

Oh well, I marked, on the paperwork, I put, Siamese, under " markings" I wrote in, flame point.

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Ah, yes! He's gorgeous and I can see his tabby stripes on his body.

Coat color genetics have always interested me and I learned quite a bit at a color forum. It is fascinating.

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arielmarie that second picture looks way more like Blueberry!!

So then, does cat color = cat breed too? Are they one and the same? Could I dumb that down to call her a tabby/siamese mix or something?

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Cat color usually doesn't equal breed, though there are a few breeds whose colors/markings are integral to the breed. IMO, the vast array of genetics available in the average alley cat population could re-create, in general, almost any breed w/ selective breeding within a few years/generations. There is no issue with you calling her a Siamese/Tabby mix or a Lynx Point mix because it is readily apparent that *is* what she is. I had a Siamese/Tabby mix (lived to be 21) though mine did not have agouti so she had no readily visible stripes like your kitty.

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Gotcha :) I love it, Heidi, thank you!

And thank you everyone else for your compliments! Blueberry would be most flattered.

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Lynx-point Siamese kittens used to be killed or given away when they showed up in a litter.

The same thing happened to Flame/Red/Cinnamon/Tortie Pointed or longer haired Siamese kittens.

They thought the female cat had mated with a non-Siamese male.

http://www.life-with-siamese-cats.com/lynx-point-siamese-cats.html

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You can tell a lot about the genetics of a litter of kittens with mixed colors. I'm bored and just wanted to share the "exercise-ings" of my mind about cat genetics.

My short-hair Siamese/tabby mix (Snow) was from a short-hair tabby-cat mother and her littermate siblings consisted of a short-hair tabby brother, a long-hair solid black sister and a short-hair solid gray sister.

This tells me the genetics their mother carried: Tabby had single copies each of the long-hair, pointed, dilute and agouti genes.

The probabilities of the sire-cat's (or cats' if there were more than one mating) genetics: He definitely had either single or double copies of long-hair, pointed and dilute genes. He could have had either single or no copies of the agouti gene.

Agouti needs only one copy to express itself. If it is present, it will always express itself in a black-based coat. It doesn't express on red-based coats but it can be present. Another interesting fact about red-based cats is they almost always show their tabby pattern; Abyssinian (ticked), classic (target) or mackerel (spotted or striped). Since Tabby was tabby marked, she obviously had agouti but since she birthed solid colored kittens this means she only had one copy of the gene and didn't pass it on to the daughters of her litter. The boy of the litter could have received his agouti gene from either his mother or his sire or he could have received a matched pair from both parents. The expression of agouti is the same whether there is one or two genes present.

The pointed gene (Siamese markings) must have two copies of the gene, receiving one from each parent, in order to express. Since Tabby wasn't pointed but Snow was, this meant Tabb had one copy and the sire-cat also gave her one copy. The sire could have been either a carrier of only one pointed gene like Tabb or he could have carried a matched pair of pointed genes and been Siamese marked.

Other genes that require two copies to express are long-hair and dilute. With only one copy, the cat is short-haired and full colored. Tabb wasn't long-haired and she wasn't dilute but since she birthed both long-hairs and a dilute, she carried one copy of each. The sire also carried at least one copy of each to give to the littermates and create the pairing that expressed those genetics.

Husband just asked me to watch a movie with him, so I'll leave this for now.

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