Horseshoe_Loop_Farm

11 Y/o Twh, Critique Please!

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On the same day that we buried my beoved 14-3 hand TWH mare Joyace, I became the new owner of a huge 16-2 hand TWH gelding.

He is registered TWHBEA as Romp & Roll Royal and right now his barn name is 'Romper', which doesn't suit him and will be changed as soon as I find something that suits him. If you have any idea's for a new name, please post them.

He is a chestnut sabino and has so many white hairs that he looks almost pink. I also need to figure out a color for him... if you think of a color that would look good on him, let me know. I already have a mare who wears red and a gelding who wears hunter green, so those are out, and Joyace wore rasberry pink, so that color is out too...

Tear him apart. Give me the good, the bad and the ugly. I'd also love a pedigree critique, as I know next to nothing about his particular bloodlines. I know more about the older bloodlines of Walkers.

http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/romp+and+roll+royal

(^ copy and paste to get his boodlines)

post-65166-0-11093200-1409111310_thumb.jpg

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I don't know walkers that well, but my first comments are:

1. Are you sure he's a sabino? I don't see sabino here, I see very extreme rabicano, but there could be white on the other side of him I'm not seeing and he does have a lot of white on the face. Not a big deal.

2. He is out of shape. The point of croup is highly visible, the topline is overall weak, but this isn't his conformation - it's a lack of muscling. Probably a result of inconsistent work.

On to the conformation itself.

The bad:

1. His shoulder is a bit more upright than I like. Comparing him with quality Walker stallions, I'm establishing that this isn't a breed trait. This may make his gait choppier and a bit less comfortable.

2. Low tail set, and it's not just the lack of top line. That also may contribute to a rougher ride.

3. A tad posty behind. Why is it so many horses, of all breeds, are posty behind these days? I've seen worse, but...

4. Upright pasterns, especially behind.

5. He's a bit tied in below the knee.

The good:

1. I like his head and his throat latch is, if a little narrow, very clean.

2. Good depth of girth, esp. for a walker, that tend to be lighter of build - lots of space for heart and lungs there.

3. Despite being tied in below the knee, his overall bone seems solid.

4. He's built slightly uphill, which will make him easier to hold together and compensate for his other faults.

Overall, I'm afraid to say that I don't like him that much - but again, I'm not a walker person.

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:) Thanks for the honesty. I personally also don't think much of his conformation... He's not a train-wreck, but he isn't 'nice' nice either... but his attitude more than makes up for it. He's very sweet, honest and tries his best. It is also very obvious that someone invested a lot of time into him as a youngster, as he is very well-trained (groundwork-wise... I haven't been on him yet).

He wintered very badly and lost a LOT of weight, so he has no muscle at all and was extremely underweight when my friend got him 5 months ago. He still needs a bit of weight and a lot of muscling, but I've seen pictures of him when he was fat and fit and he was very nice looking...

I'm used to the older style walkers that are thicker, stockier and shorter... so I'm still getting used to Mr. Bean-Pole myself... Lol...

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Yes, he is a tad bit ribby... I just got him some Cool Calories 99% dry fat supplement to go with his feed today.

He's on pasture 24/7 and also has 24/7 access to a round bale of hay and a salt and mineral block. He gets half a scoop (1 pound) of alfalfa pellets and half a scoop (1 pound) of Champions Choice complete feed twice daily (I'm slowly upping his feed, as until three days ago he was on a different feed), and he also gets two scoops of Cool Calories in the morning and in the afternoon, which ill also slowly be upped until he's on 4 scoops twice daily.

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I think he'll look a lot better at many levels once you have his weight where it should be and then ride him up and down a few hills ;).

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I agree that once he is in shape, he will look a lot better, and a great mind certainly compensates for slight conformation flaws, but since this is a conformation forum, I will comment on what strikes me the most

I agree that he is somewhat post legged behind, and also looks to being back at the knees in front

He has a nice back to under line ratio, good neck and shoulder, however he is not balanced, being front end heavy and short in the hip and steep in the croup

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The head is a little bit disproportionate with the length of the neck. When you measure from the poll to the top lip, the length of the head should be shorter than that of the neck. Going into the neck, the neck is a midge short which dictates a little bit how he uses his head to shift his centre of gravity and maintain his balance. The neck should be 1/3 of the overall length of the horse which this horse is just shy of reaching. There is a lack of topline which is easily corrected with riding. A shorter neck makes it more difficult to flex and bend and is crucial for balance and collection. A lot of the time a shorter next is accompanied with a more upright shoulder which you can see in this horse. Because the neck muscle helps pull the shoulder and front leg forward, a shorter neck means a shorter stride. I can't assess the chest because there are no photos available.

His upper leg, his humerus is nice and long which provides more leverage and consequently more strength and power to attached muscles. Length also increase the range of motion which allows for greater arc at the elbow. A long humerus also increases the mobility of the elbow. Cant assess forearm spacing due to lack of photos. The knees look great and no calf knee or bucked knee is present. When looking at the lower leg, I can see round bone which is undesirable because the tendons are too close to the canon bone all the way down. This means this horse would be more prone to stress those tendons during fast work, uneven terrain, steep hills etc. His pasterns look great. You usually want the slope to be 47-55 degrees to give the horse sufficient leverage and power and shock absorbing ability.

His stifle should be at the same height as the elbow, and they are pretty close. It provides more leverage of the hind quarters. Its in the direct line with the hip bone. Cant assess the hock properly because of how the horse is standing. The horse is also standing on a hill(or it looks like an angle in the photo). The height of the hock should be the same as the chestnuts in the front which is the case. Cant assess anything else in the hind leg because of how the horse is standing, so it would not give a fair assessment. Also no other photos available.

The horse is build downhill. Means it will be more difficult to get the horse to move off his front end and power from behind when ridden. This horse has a deep girth giving him plenty of room for his lungs to expand during hard work. Don't want to comment much on the shoulder angle,

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The horse is build downhill.

Looks can be deceiving. Take a good look at the brick wall in front of him. Unless they are building it leaning to the right, the whole pic is canted slightly to the right. Tilt it left til the wall is straight, and things change.

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