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Dog With Uti/vaginitis...treated And Still Bleeding?

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Spayed female gsd 3 1/2 years old. Started bleeding(spotting) from vagina, we only knew from tiny blood spots on white bedding. It isnt dripping blood, just leaves a spot if she sits. She was showing obivious discomfort while urinating. I took her to the vets and they prescribed anitbiotics for a uti with possible vaginitis as well. This is a new vet as we are in the middle of relocting to a new state. She also had a yeast infection in her ears which is all cleared up.

She finished anitbiotics on Thursday and she is still spotting. She seems to be peeing much better as well. The bleeding did stop for about a week, and we took her to the state park where she did drink from a stream and the bleeding started about a day after that. This is pretty much our weekend routine....going to the park for walks where they drink from streams.we did it before this all started.

Also, our male neutered dog is with us. He is in the same routine as her and fine. He does however go up to her behind and do the licking/chomping he would do when she was in heat before being spayed.

Do I need to take her back to the vets...or could this be a false heat?

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Was a urinalysis actually run or just prescribed antibiotics? Start with a full u/a to rule out crystals/stones primarily, ideally performed in sterile manner (not a free catch, but cystocentesis where the urine is withdrawn directly from the bladder with a needle & syringe), ideally with a culture. Vaginal exam should be performed to rule out vaginal masses. Vaginal cytology should be able to indicate if she is actually in heat, indicating retained ovarian tissue.

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They did none of that. They said that they could not feel any stones, but if the symptoms continue to being her back for Xray to look for stones. There was no mention of trying to get urine samples or doing a vaginal exam.

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any chance of rat poisoning? i just went through this with a young male dog, also castrated who gave us the alarm when he started to have problems urinating. the ultra sound said it all-showed internal bleeding that among other thiings were causing pressure and pain on the little tunnel between kidneys and bladder. rat poisoning shows up slowly. in the meantime i feel sorry for the rats--it's a slow and horrible death.

they gave him vitamin K, pain killers and antibiotics, and he was in the clinic for 3 days to the tune of 1300 bucks. he's still on meds but home and ALIVE because we caught just in time. good luck whatever it is!

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No rat poisoning. We have been in the hotel since before this started. She is under constant supervision and kept leashed outside. Although I will say the water has super high chlorine in it...as soon as you turn on the water you can smell the chlorine.

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Rodenticide toxicity is actually a rather acute situation and not a long-term type diagnosis. They can literally be symptomatic in a matter of hours from the point of ingestion. Any number of coagulopathies are a bit more chronic, but all are potentially fatal (immune-mediated thrombocytopenia for example, congenital clotting dysfunction such as VonWillebran's disease, etc). All unlikely in this dog's case. I'd put retained ovarian tissue or a bladder stone higher on the list.

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iNteresting, but off topic, that dogs also can get VonWillebrans disease, a combo of Factor V111 and platelet disorder

My lab career consisted at one point in the coagulation field

So then, can kidney stones cause abnormal/frequent urination in a horse? I am taking my 28 year old mare to my vet to have her condition evaluated

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Kidney stones are not particularly common in horses. Bladder stones to some degree, but in a 28-year old mare polyuria would be Cushing's disease until proven otherwise.

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Thanks, CVM.

I did not consider Cushings, as she sheds normally and had a very slick coat this summer

I realize that the pituitary gland is the 'master gland', and thus many endocrine systems can be affected, but she is healthy except for what would be considered urinary incontinence in a human

Guess I will find out next week, when we get past this winter preview of snow and I haul her to my vet!

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Hi I had a dog and she was notorious for stones. She didn't show blood, but I also noticed the strain of peeing. She also had UTI's. The antibiotics cleared up the UTI but she started to hump her back very slightly so we suspected stones and I think the vet x-rayed her. If I remember right we were able to dissolve the stones using Science Diet as they were the type of stone we could do this with. It depends on what type of stone it is. After we got a history I got her on a strict diet and just was more aware of her tendency of UTI's. What was funny she also would get a yeast infection and our male dog would start to get nosey like yours. That was my first sign I knew something was starting. Once I got her on a very strict diet that solved the problem. But I remember the vet telling me it depends on the type of stones if this is successful. Good luck.

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I have not taken this dog back to the vet. The bleeding stopped a couple of days after I posted this. The peeing is normal and she is her spunky irritating happy self! I will be on high alert with her watching for any problems. And if they pop back up she will be taken to the vet.

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