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Riverdoggreen

Dr.jeykle/mr. Hyde

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actually looking to see if anyone else has dealt with a Jekyll/Hyde horse before. We have a gelding in his teens, who is awesome under saddle for anyone, is even qualified and a member on our sheriff dept SAR unit, and great in parades and with public all while saddled or altered. When in pasture he will pin ears and charge. If you throw up arms or just point at him he veers off, or will stop short of you and present his side or rear and watches you, while looking away. He will come between us and the other geldings, try to herd them away, ect... We do get after him, and he has gotten better with us, still runs up ears pinned, but not near as bad, but with other people he will charge them over the fence, he actually will patrol the fence line between the stranger and the other geldings. Even if the people are across the yard, if he hears them, he is on guard. Problem is we are now forced to re-home him. When we first got him my husband remembers the lady mentioning he was better kept by himself??

Read more: http://forums.horsecity.com/index.php?showtopic=47099996&page=6#ixzz3KZXcdsP2

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From what you have said I would suspect this gelding might be cryptoid. His behavior with his herd seems over the top and more like a stallion type response. You mention he is in with other geldings, notice any stud like tendencies when he is around mares even if it is very slight ? Have you ever witnessed him in with a mare? That would be a red flag if someone said he's better by himself. Have you ever considered a blood test for testosterone levels?

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He has been in with mixed group before, and the mares were not nice to him. He has never tried to mount a mare either. Now my other gelding I has been checked as he would mount a real persistent mare, and he prances all around when first introduced to a couple different places, he checked out fine, but he is very gentle, well behaved. We currently had to move and the boarding place we are at is with a percheron mare, and none of the geldings, including Cody, care. A plus is he tried to push her around ,away from hay ect... Claim the paddock, and she pushed him, literally. He no longer is running the group. Behavior was actually not as aggressive today, still there, just tuned down

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Usually, the concept is a taght that if you get a horse's respect on the ground, it will transfer to under saddle work

However, sometimes the reverse can occur , and some horses, when at liberty, do not respect that person like they do when ridden or caught

They have learned that you can't control them when they are at liberty.

This is a case where I would use around pen and teach that horse that you can control him, and demand his respect, even though he has nothing on his head or on his back

Never allow him to rush at you, turn his rear to you, or even come up to you with ears pinned. Carry a lunge whip

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I agree with Smilie. This horse's behavior sounds very similar to my gelding's behavior when I got him many years ago. I worked on the ground, round pen, longing, over obstacles, etc. and taught him to stay out of my space for respect. He used to run at me with ears pinned also. He now respects me much

more,but periodically needs to be reminded that I am his "leader". Under saddle, he has always been willing and listens. On the ground was always the problem.

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Even a stallion can learn this respect!

Cody, would never think of trying to dominant me, even when out in the pasture

One time my friend, who was breeding a mare to him, went into his pasture, and while he did not charge her, I could see that happening if she were to have continued to interact with him over time

It was a good example of giving a horse an inch, esp a stallion, and they will eventually take that proverbial mile!.

Cody walked towards my friend, she backed up, Cody came quicker, with my friend giving ground faster, until she ducked under the fence.

See where that leads eventually, with that horse getting the wrong body language?

Horses constantly test who is leading who, an dif you are not that firm clear leader, they will take over.

That gelding would get a very clear message that aggression towards humans , while at liberty, or other wise, has zero tolerance.

Heck, he might even be a good example to use an equine shock collar on, if you can't use a long lunge whip effectively enough.

He needs more than arms thrown up, when he comes at you with pinned ears! He needs to feel the end of a lunge whip, enough to make him a believer!

Charge him back- make him give ground to you, and I sure as heck would be moving as fast as I could, to actually apply that whip to his hide!

Edited by Smilie

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When I bought Sienna I kept her at the same place for a month.

One of the major reasons that I moved her, is the girl who pulled the hay and feed cart from pasture to pasture.

Sienna figured out if she ran at the girl. The girl would run away and Sienna got to scarf down grain and sweet feed until someone else came and took it away.

I told the girl that she was training my horse to attack people and she needed to STOP IT! I wanted her to carry a lunge whip and to whack Sienna as hard as needed on the neck & hip to keep her away from the cart. I was told "Stacy (owner) doesn't allow us to use whips on horses!" :rolleye0014:

Then I told her to stop going thru Sienna's turnout area to get to the other horses. Her reply "Stacy says it's the fastest way to feed the horses!" When I told Stacy that I was upset that my horse was learning how to attack people and was at risk from colicing on all that grain. She said "Most horses bluff, it's no big deal." :thud:

To this day, Sienna has to stand back from her feed barrel and wait for a person to give her the cue to come forward and eat. Before she gets the cue, she has stand in place with her head level, ears forward and her eyes soft. No sweet behavior, no hay.

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Barn name: Robbie

Full Name: Robert Louis Stevensen ( In case you don't know he wrote the Dr. Jekyl story)

We actually named our horse this!

He is great now, but I think the simplest most effective thing we ever taught him was to stand as if he was tied until told he is allowed to go to his food and eat. It reinforces the basic herd behavior of who is top horse (me). Now even my 5 year old can handle him from the ground. Including feeding which was originally a major source of pushy\disrespectful behavior. Of course, there was a great deal of other training over the years, but that one simple thing makes a huge difference in how horses see you in the pecking order. Just be prepared to throw out his dinner. We did that a lot at first!

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