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Chocomare

Boggles The Mind....

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Whoever the farrier is, he/she needs to hang up their rasp. Where on God's green earth is this ever acceptable? This is sheer laziness!

21-Year Old Welsh-X mare. Been shod like this for years!!

Before/With Shoes

11194461_10205088222380199_1323665497271

11157565_10205088222900212_5391099083523

Before trim/post shoe removal

11194765_10205084705092269_876622625_o.j

Lateral/before trim

11196579_10205084706212297_937641756_o.j

After sole:

11180473_10205084724492754_762286668_o.j

After-lateral

11202749_10205084724292749_1768492071_o.

The good thing is, I'm slowly putting this farrier out of business. I now have 4 of his clients--2 more to go.

Ladies & Gentlemen: If your horse's hooves look like this, it's time for a serious change. Do your research. Learn what hooves should look like--how they should function. STOP settling for counterfeit that is causing your horse pain.

Off my soapbox..... Sigh.

Edited by Chocomare

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Was the owner letting the horse go too long between farrier visits?

Granted, I've *rarely* shod my horses (they've all been barefoot) so I do not know what I'm looking at in your photos. One thing I do know, the hooves look too long and I don't like the shape of them - especially how the heels seem too far forward. <-- and that, I assume is because the hooves have been allowed to grow too long? ... making the toe/hoof slant forward and the structures above the hoof slant backwards? The feet in your first photo don't even look like they belong to the same horse, they are so different from each other.

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No, this mare was shod every six weeks (the "standard" for shod world). This is pure laziness, plain & simple.

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Obviously not. That's the only way heels get that high. This poor mare was walking on stilts. No wonder she was grumpy for lessons.

Wee bit, by wee bit I'll get those heels down.

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Links 3 and 4 wouldn't come up, so I didn't get any satisfaction in your trim (which I know I would!) so I got robbed of your before and after, but I think its my stupid internet, cause it was trying...like forever, lol! Best wishes on your challenges of picking up after this farrier. I'm sure the horses thank you! Facing such challenges and being able to correct and make the horse more comfortable sure gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling inside for the good you've done. I don't think I've felt such satisfaction from any job I've had in my life like this one and I think you'd agree whole heartedly!

If this farrier was lazy, it was in the caring department and I think the rest was ignorance. Many people trust in their farrier and let him do his thing freely. In return, the farrier sees lack of hoof care and figures the owner doesn't care either....until the horse goes lame. (not that this horse hasn't been cared for) So because of this trust in the farrier, the owner remains ignorant of the hoof as well. I had a farrier...once that did the opposite for the same reason. He reamed the hoof out all down to waxy sole and sored my horses for 3 weeks. When asked why, he said that he does it in defense of the hoof because owners don't do their part. All that is changing now, as people are becoming much more informed about feet.....but still......and that's what you are doing, Chocomare, taking the knowledge and awareness out to the barn...to the owners and empowering them to advocate for their horse and question things intelligently. This is an important area of trimming and still a challenge. The trimmer is only there for an hour, the rest of the time, its the owner's homework and it must be done.

Heidi, on this horse, yes the length has contributed to the flare forward. If you draw an imaginary line down the middle of the cannon to the ground, that's where the heel should be landing. The shoe has held the wall, while the torque has migrated the hoof forward anyway, in a symmetrical/lineal fashion. The torque on the excess toe pulls everything behind it forward, bars, frogs, heels. When the heels get forward enough to be landing on the back of the heel pillars, instead of facing the ground, the landing smushes the heel forward to add a double whammy to the forward direction. This hoof's heels have been held somewhat by the shoe, from being smushed forward, but has gone higher, because it had no where else to go. Add the fact that this is a hoof that loves to hold onto thrush, has atrophied the frog and contracted the heels, weakened the digital cushion. Thrush, which can be worse at the back of the foot, can cause a horse to avoid the heel, letting it grow longer from lack of use as well. Its not just the trim, but the discomfort from it that speaks. The area that concerns me more is inbetween the toe and heel in the quarter area, which is also long, no arch, no mechanism, just jamming upwards....look up, see the arched coronary band that is evidence. If I had this foot on, for me, it would be like ouch on landing thrushy heels and right on forward to a bigger ouch thru the quarters. When everything hurts on the back half of the foot, that's where you get the toe first landing that lets the heels grow longer. You can either get rid of pathology with every step thereafter, or you can perpetuate it. One way or the other, trimmer's choice. This farrier has been performing the latter. Anyway, when you look at this kind of hoof, think flare forward has taken the hoof out from under the descending weight of the horse, heels and toes and left the heel bulbs hanging. Nothing is backwards but the growth coming out of the coronary band has been all forward. Think of the direction growing/pulling from out of the band....forward.

This pic is evidence that a mere shoe will not answer to the descending weight of the horse and the trim imbalance will torque on the hoof anyway and that even though the shoe slows the blood and feelings of discomfort, its still very much there to the horse, just look up to the soft tissue above the hoof, the band, the knees, the shoulder, the back, even to the poll. The path of pathology created by discomfort. It's really a path of pain and sometimes a chiro is needed to break it and free up the mechanisms that are to go with a more balanced hoof. After time, this path can become locked in and chronic. By getting rid of pain and replacing it with confidence, the horse learns to walk properly again.

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Check the album. I added 2 update photos from last night. I trimmed 8, so didn't have time to get more.

NOTE: the vet wrap on the off hoof is from a case of scratches they're treating on her ;)

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