MarkSaha

Lady Joe

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I watch movies all the time, where I'm saying, " they call that horse a BAY, it's a sorrel"! And, "that horse keeps changing from a sorrel to a bay", so I can so see that happening .......drives my husband nuts when I do that. Especially when I shout out, " they think no one notices that"!

This is the advantage of writing books rather than screenplays. If I write in a book that a horse is a sorrel, who is to say it isn't?

But if my screenplay has an actor call a horse a sorrel in a movie, I don't have much control over what horse the production people come up with at the shoot.

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Sure, any horse can do anything you want, some breeds just do it better.

My 17hh Friesian CAN do those things, if I choose to go that route, but, she hasn't the speed or agility to do it like a QH, who is built and bred for it.

I imagine Arabians are quite good, they're speedy, versatile critters.

I've managed to beat a lot of stock horses, and my stallion's foals have gotten quite popular here. :happy0203:

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I have a lusitano that does working cow horse and a little but of cutting, but he's out of a line in Portugal bred for the bull ring. interesting to watch how QHs hunker down to work and this type of lusitano goes up and over (on the hindquarters). now my husband's WB occasionally works cows too, but his attitude is "what's the hurry? they're not going anywhere" lol. but it Is true that we get every breed imaginable come to get over cow phobias or riders come to get over their fear issues, but as equi says some are built and have the mind to do it really well while for others because of things like conformation it's more difficult. whatever the breed, it's guaranteed fun, fun, fun!

back to lady joe--it would be quite something if carlofab got a movie offer. we've had members on here get published with calendars and photography books, and book books after all, so you never know.

keeping my fingers crossed carlo!

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Great reviews Carlo!!!!!

I am so happy for you!!!! :yay: :yay: :yay: :yay: :yay:

When it comes time to find the multiple duplicate horses need to play parts in movies, they often use bays or sorrels because they are plentiful and common colors. Even if the book had a different or rarer colored horse (like a roan or dun).

They often need six to seven individual horses to play one part. One glamor horse for close ups, others to do different tricks, one calm & forgiving horse that will sit for hours between takes and carry a greenhorn rider, another horse with fabulous movement that will run around at liberty and come back to the trainer for long distant shots. Horses like people, get tired and need time away from the lights and cameras. So they switch them in and out to keep them fresh.

Friends of my family, were actors and horse wranglers on dozens of old Westerns and TV shows.

They used to talk about how they used women's hair dyes, paint (mostly white) and powdered charcoal to change the colors or markings of the movie horses. One horse that was trained to fall without being hurt, had it's coat and markings changed five times during a six day shooting schedule. In one movie being filmed out in the boonies of Arizona, the clothing designer came unglued when the good guy's white hat fell back and slid down the charcoal and oil covered leg of his "black" & white paint horse.

I enjoy trying to spot each different horse during the course of a movie. :happy0203:

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Thank you,Nick and Dondie ...

Dondie, I never thought about that, but your comments about needing multiple horses to play the same one make perfect sense.

If I get to do a movie script, I will argue for developing the "Felony Haulin" chapter so there is opportunity to show some truly fierce cutting, not just by Lady Joe but other top horses and riders in top venues across country. This doesn't depart from the plot line at all, and would be a powerful highlight of the movie.

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This is probably misbehavior on the part of an author, but I liked this new review of Lady Joe so much that I have to share it ...

Oh What A Tangled Web We Weave

At the very beginning of Huckleberry Finn, Huck tells the reader that what Mark Twain wrote about him in Tom Sawyer was mostly the truth, but he may have stretched it a little in places. Then he adds that he never knew anyone who always told the truth, except for his Aunt Polly and Mary. This straight up warns the reader that there may be some stretchers in the tale that follows. I couldn't help thinking about Huck when in the first pages of Lady Joe, Lee Estes never even considers telling the truth about how he lost his boss's prized cutting horse. Instead he concocts a deception to save himself which involves his best friend Jim Harrison. Lee is as good as Huck was in devising schemes to get out of trouble, but it seems each stretcher leads to a complication which then leads to more trouble. The hilarious tale is told with Twainian humor and warmth as well as a bit of nostalgia. It left me wanting to read about Lee and Jim's next adventure.

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This is probably misbehavior on the part of an author, but I liked this new review of Lady Joe so much that I have to share it ...

Oh What A Tangled Web We Weave

At the very beginning of Huckleberry Finn, Huck tells the reader that what Mark Twain wrote about him in Tom Sawyer was mostly the truth, but he may have stretched it a little in places. Then he adds that he never knew anyone who always told the truth, except for his Aunt Polly and Mary. This straight up warns the reader that there may be some stretchers in the tale that follows. I couldn't help thinking about Huck when in the first pages of Lady Joe, Lee Estes never even considers telling the truth about how he lost his boss's prized cutting horse. Instead he concocts a deception to save himself which involves his best friend Jim Harrison. Lee is as good as Huck was in devising schemes to get out of trouble, but it seems each stretcher leads to a complication which then leads to more trouble. The hilarious tale is told with Twainian humor and warmth as well as a bit of nostalgia. It left me wanting to read about Lee and Jim's next adventure.

Crazy cool to be compared to Twain!

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Paints don't do cutting, JG?

Oh no they do. But my horse would stand out with the rest of the horses described in the book!! That's all. My horse would love to cut.

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My little gaited mare can cut goats, sign us up.

Foxtrotters were bred to be cow horses in the Ozarks. You should try her on cows.

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Lady Joe Kindle is 99 cents today ...

Lady Joe Kindle Countdown Promotion - download for 99 cents.

Amazon is doing this, and it's their algorithm, so don't ask me to explain it.

Starts Wednesday, October 14th at 8am Pacific Standard Time

Download Lady Joe Kindle --

1) October 14 – 8 am PST for 32 hrs = .99 cents

2) October 15 – 4 pm PST 32 hrs = $1.99

3) October 17 – 12 am PST for 32 hrs = $2.99

4) October 18 – 8 am PST for 32 hrs = $3.99

5) October 19 – 4 pm PST for 32 hrs = $4.99

ENDS October 21st at 12 am PST – returns to list price $9.99

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