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nick

The Pit Bull Is A Lovely Dog

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The owners of those dogs aren't people I want to talk to. And it's hard to get Animal Control to investigate abused animals, much less untrained ones. It's sometimes wiser to avoid "life situations." I'll take my chances with a Dachshund any day over a Pit Bull.

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Nick, comparing the bite of a Pitbull to the bite of a weiener dog, Pomeranian, or other small dog was an excellent example. The herding instinct of a Border Collie compared to the instinct of a Pitbull being aggressive is another great example. It really makes me wonder, apparently the places that Ban them must have just drew the Pitbull breed out of a hat. Thank you for your insight and wisdom educating me. If only every dog owner could be as great a trainer as you, we could all live in harmony. We could all live life according to Nick. Next time I'm facing an aggressive Pitbull that has a horrible owner, I'll just ask myself, what would Nick do.

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What, exactly, are you asking people to do here?

and dog owners who "avoid" situations are very like pulling on the leash, which only sends tension down that connection and exacerbates the situation. how about having a talk with those pit owners instead? and if that doesn't work report them to animal control or the cops.

First, if I am walking my dog who is behaving well and I see a "thug" type of person being jerked along behind a pulling pit bull who is intently eyeing my dog .... there is nothing in this world that could convince me to approach said dog/owner to speak with them about their barely controlled dog's behavior because that would endanger my dog and myself.

Would you approach someone who was barely controlling a pulling bully who was eyeing your dog like a squeaky toy with your own well behaved dog to speak with them about their and their dog's poor manners? I can't see *that* scenario ending well.

As for reporting to animal control and law enforcement ... how well do you think a call like this would be prioritized; "Someone's leashed dog is scaring me because it appears it can get loose at any moment, come talk to them about controlling their animal in public." ... I don't think there is anything they can do, and chances are they would arrive long after person/dog have left the scene. It would end up being a report with nothing (descriptions, no names) to go forward on.

Unless it appears disaster is imminent and/or until something bad happens, authorities' hands are tied.

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mr. clipper, a bite from an entire chihuaua whose owner found it so kyoot, that it could approach my well behaved neutered male bc. and try to hump him landed me in the hospital for four days hooked up to an IV twice a day for antibiotics because I got blood poisoning. what happened? my dog ignored him, I suggested to the owner that he interrupt this behavior and when he continued to just find the behavior macho because my dog is bigger, I picked it up to interrupt this behavior and then he bit.

the hospital bill? stupid should hurt.

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Why point out the breed? It's the owner's fault isn't it, not the breed's?

The "pill bull fanatics" as I call them are always quick to point out other breeds, but scream at the top of their lungs if you point out their breed.

Not saying you are doing that at all, mind you, just using it as an example.

If there was one breed that, in the end, was "my" breed, it would be Chihuahuas. Not one of mine ever bit a soul. Were anything but friendly happy lovable pets. Yes they trembled, but as a breed characteristic, not in anxiety. They walked on a leash and knew obedience.

They also can be the most horrible little monsters imaginable in the wrong hands.

Sound familiar?

But they are not pit bull type dogs.

A beginning dog owner with a Chihuahua can end up with a nasty little rat that has to be held down firmly at the vet and is at risk of being punted across a yard when it picks on the wrong person, or killed when it comes against the wrong dog.

A beginning dog owner with a pit bull can end up with a deadly weapon.

Obviously I am taking the extreme approach.

And again I want to make it clear. I am against BSL. I am for *appropriate* ownership of pit bull type breeds, as well as high energy breeds and other breeds that take a skilled handler to properly own - which includes livestock guardian dog breeds as well.

Pit bulls are not special - their fanatic fans, on the other hand....

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Apples, meet oranges.

Nick, the point people are trying to make, is what if that Chihuahua were a much larger pit bull and instead of air-humping your dog's leg it was trying to bite his throat? THOSE are the situations people are trying to avoid for their dogs and themselves.

I don't discount that a bite from a small dog can land someone in the hospital for infection and damages like a large dog, but it is clear the situations (tiny aggressive dog vs large aggressive dog) are completely different and most certainly call for different management practices. In my case, it would be avoid, Avoid, AVOID, much like Clippers advocated doing.

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Heidi, I understand your apprehension, but what do you want to do as a dog owner if there's an irresponsible pit bull owner around every corner, or a rat terrier for that matter? become a shut in? in the united states, as far as I know, there are strict leash laws which carry hefty fines if violated. notify the owners before you notify the authorities in the interests of communication, but let the know there WILL be consequences. for gawd's sake stand up for yourself and your dog's right to go for a walk without fear of being attacked!

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I'm not worried about my dog; I don't have one. I'm worried about myself. Leash laws? I doubt if there are any in rural counties. You can't even get a dogcatcher to come after strays. Look at the deaths from dog bites in the US. A big majority are from Pit Bulls. Maybe it's the fault of the owners as you say but that doesn't stop it from happening. Nick, you seem to get your information about life in the US from your time in CA. The US is a lot bigger than CA (and a lot different.)

Edited by jubal

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your argument that I base my information only on my time in CA is specious. I have had the experience in france, Italy, Germany where I l have lived for 25 years. the European continent is also a LOT bigger than California. dogs are dogs, and people are people. there are the same patterns everywhere.

I can't address your fears about leash laws in your neighborhood because you don't tell anyone where you are.

as to dog bies in the u.s. leading to deaths? how do these compare to mass shootings like columbine, sandy hook, aka domestic terrorism. and what is YOUR source?

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Why can't we talk about pit bulls or even just dog breeds.

Why does Sandy Hook or Columbine have to come into it.

Believe it or not, it's possible to discuss one without the other and still appreciate the enormities of both.

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pit bulls (weapons) or dog breeds don't kill or injure people, people kill or injure people. right? I think it is very relevant.

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Since Pit Bulls don't usually carry guns, I'm not even going to address that. Is it Happy Hour in Germany?

Every state in the US doesn't have leash laws. Your thinking that it does shows you are out of touch.

https://www.animallaw.info/intro/dog-leash-laws

As far as dog bite fatalities in the US:

http://www.dogsbite.org/dog-bite-statistics-fatalities-2015.php and

http://www.livescience.com/27145-are-pit-bulls-dangerous.html

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pit bulls (weapons) or dog breeds don't kill or injure people, people kill or injure people. right? I think it is very relevant.

Absolutely ludicrous!!!!!!! An animal, such as a dog, thinks for itself, A GUN DOES NOT!!!! Are you seriously this kind of person in real life,or just on the internet?

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Heidi, I understand your apprehension, but what do you want to do as a dog owner if there's an irresponsible pit bull owner around every corner, or a rat terrier for that matter? become a shut in? in the united states, as far as I know, there are strict leash laws which carry hefty fines if violated. notify the owners before you notify the authorities in the interests of communication, but let the know there WILL be consequences. for gawd's sake stand up for yourself and your dog's right to go for a walk without fear of being attacked!

I haven't had a dog since 2000, but I'd either spray aggressively approaching dogs with mace or take my dog by car somewhere safer to walk, one where loose dogs aren't an issue. If I were in a neighborhood setting and there was an issue, I'd *maybe* approach the person alone (no dogs) to give them a head's up. Then again, I might not and just let Animal Control or Officers surprise them with a ticket.

BUT....

If I am walking my dog and meet an unknown person barely controling an aggressive dog, I ain't gonna hang around to tell them they're doing it wrong. My first responsibility would be to get my dog and myself to safety by *avoiding* a confrontation.

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I have been bitten/attacked by several dogs in my life. The first happened when I was only a little kid in a pet store with my mom. Must have gotten too close to doggy's face while the adults were chatting and not paying attention (stuff like this happens every day unfortunately) the dog bit me in the face. This dog was not a pit bull. It was a female Rottweiler.

I have also been bitten by my grandmother's dog a few times when I was simply trying to give my grandmother a huand kiss goodbye. Her dog is a female chihuahua.

Another time, my little mutt dog, who is only about 20 pounds, found himself on the receiving end of an attack from another dog when we were walking at a local public lake. This dog, whose owner was walking behind him and didn't make any attempt to control the dog (it was not on a leash) came at my dog unprovoked and obviously out for blood. I scooped my dog up and was kicking at the other dog to hold it off, while screaming at the owner to get his dog back! The idiot just kept saying "don't worry, he's friendly! He won't hurt you!" While his dog was jumping on me and snapping at my dog. He finally got control of the dog and put it on a leash when I pulled out my buck knife. That dog was a male Labrador.

Not once have I ever been attacked by a pit bull. Not once have I ever felt threatened by one.

I don't think a dog's breed necessarily always defines how the will/should act. Every dog has their own personality, just like people. Sure, every breed has certain characteristics that make them unique. But that doesn't mean that every dog within a certain breed will act the same. Not all pit bulls are aggressive. Not all labradors are loveable.

The pit bull is a terrier breed that were originally breed to hunt wild game such as boar and bear. No, they are not "nanny dogs" and I do not think they are the right choice for everyone to own. But with any dog, you must have the time to give them and the patience to train and work with them. Desensitize them to as many life situations as possible. Introduce them to other dogs and people. Teach them basic commands, have a good "call back" instilled in them, and for goodness sake, learn to read a dog's body language!

I am sorry for those of you who have had bad experiences with pits. That is truely unfortunate and the owners of those dogs probably shouldn't have them.

But my experience s with pits have never been bad. And I do have one, a neutered male, whom I love very much and is a joy to own :) he has never been aggressive to people or other dogs. He knows and follows commands very well, always comes when called, and is just a great all-around dog to have. Many of my friends and family have met him and they all fall in love. I will not ask you to give pits another chance just based on my experience though, as I respect the fact that your experiences with them have obviously not been like mine. But I also will never apologize for never having such experiences, or for liking pit bulls.

Also I'd just like to add that while I do like pit bulls as a breed, that doesn't mean I'd just go pick any random one out from the local pet shop to take home. Not everyone will have spent the time training their dog as I have mine, so I can't be sure they would be a good match for me and my home. But I guess that could go for all dog breeds, huh? ;)

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As a vet tech, I came into contact with a pit bull every now and then..... there actually, weren't very many who were clients..... anyway, I never had a bad experience with one.....the one dog that did bite me, was a Share Pei and, it wasn't the first time it had bitten someone, as we found out.

I have no doubt, people have had encounters with pit bulls, I hear the stories all the time, but, I have never had a bad experience.

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The very first pit bull I ever met was a female who had recently birthed a litter of puppies. She was so proud to introduce her family to me! That mamma pit knocked down a large prejudice wall for me about the breed.

My most recent encounter with a pit bull that was tense occurred while riding my horse near a rural neighborhood (houses on one side, fenced field on the other). A woman had taken her un-neutered male pit out for a potty break on a leash. She walked him across the road to do his business near a road sign. Neither one noticed us approaching. When the dog eventually saw us, he cut short his peeing, lunged towards us and began barking. His owner crouched back to act as a counterweight against him but I think they were evenly matched in weight and he was slowly inching closer with every lunge. I asked her to take a wrap around the sign post with her leash, not let go and I'd get past and down the road asap.

In my mind, I flash thought about having to yell "Hold him or you'll be paying vet bills for my horse!" and also thinking if I said that, she'd certainly feel offended and would probably holler back about me having to pay her vet bills if my horse hurt her dog, me returning with "Leash law, you'll pay my bills!" and realizing all these words would do and mean ABSOLUTELY NOTHING if anyone (animal or person) got hurt.

Luckily, she held her dog, we exchanged no more words and no one got hurt. But that encounter has made me wary to ride that way again without mace to deter aggressive dogs who are able to approach too closely.

*****

I've returned to this because I realize I didn't make a distinction between these encounters.

Dogs are individuals.

Their handlers are individuals.

Every encounter is unique to the situation and should be evaluated and actions taken according to the experience of the moment.

Edited by Heidi n Q

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Heidi, if you're having problems with dogs getting too close to your horse, consider a proper hunting whip. A lash waved in their vague direction will deter most of them :P.

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^^^ Thanks, but I'd rather have something I can keep in a pocket (mace) vs something I'd have to keep in my hand the entire ride.

That is still an excellent idea, do you know if they have slip handles that could just swing from my wrist until/if I need it? (gonna Google "hunting whip")

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I Googled hunting whips and I like the short handles with the tail and cracker at the end. It is kind of like a short longe whip and I can snap and crack one of those! All of the pics I see though have what looks like a cane head, no wrist loop. Do they have to be carried or can it be hung from the saddle in some way?

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They're normally carried. Proper ones have a hook shaped head - it's for opening gates. You could probably find a way to secure it, though.

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a dachshund that has grown up in the wild also isn't a family pet. and they were bred to hunt wild boar--doesn't mean they have to.

Haha I just caught this and needed to point out that dachshunds were developed to hunt badgers. Though I bet one could take on a wild boar too, lol!

:winking:

Edited by Epona142

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Not in Germany, their country of origin. "Dachshund" was a lot shorter than "wildschweinhund" and most likely more attractive for the masses who couldn't control them.

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