gisles

Bucking When Spooked

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I have a horse that we have had for 10 years. About 4 years ago he got spooked real bad when my husband was riding by the shoulder of the road and a truck sped by right beside him. They didn't even try to get over. It spooked his horse and he just started bucking like in the rodeo. My husband fell off and he ran away. We didn't take him out to ride as much after that. Mainly around the house.

Last year my husband was in the hospital for about 8 months after being in a bad auto accident. I decided to sell his horse because I didn't want to ride him because of the way he bucked that time I didn't trust him. I sent him to a trainer for 30 days. They loved him and raved about how good he was and fun to ride. When I would go there and ride he was well behaved. My husband talked me into keeping him so for about 3 months I have been riding him. At the same time a friend of mine has been riding him too.

Three weeks ago a friend of mine came over and we went for a ride. He was acting a little nervous and so was her horse. Her horse kept stopping and refusing to go. I had my horse slightly in front of hers waiting for her to get her horse to go and all of a sudden her horse spooked and spun toward me and my horse. He took off bucking like he was a rodero horse again. I finally fell off. I got a cracked rib and a torn rotator cuff from it. I fell lucky that was al. Needless to say I will never ride him again. My other friend wants to buy him. I worry about this bucking when spooked even if it has only happened twice in 10 years.

Is there anyway to get him to stop bucking like a bronc when he gets spooked like that? It seems like it is when it comes from behind or the side unexpectedly. He has spooked at other things he sees without bucking.

Sorry this was so long.

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I am not a trainer, but it seems good desensitizing can only go so far. The solution here may be in the hands of the rider. Specifically, recognizing scenarios where the horse is in a situation that a bad spook could occur (both situations you presented are ones where the signs where there - traffic, another spooky horse - but the rider didn't ride according to their surroundings) and the rider has to be ready to prevent it by keeping control of the horse's body.

I recently came off my mare during a spook because I wasn't paying attention to the rider ahead of us when her horse spooked and mine reacted. Now I'm more aware when they lead.

Edited by Heidi n Q

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Once a horse spooks, he reaction is often determined by the rider. A grabbing response -- both with hands and legs -- is usually automatic, like a reflex. If the rider does not follow this response by relaxing, the horse is likely to continue his spooking action. If the rider is both squeezing with legs -- telling the horse to go -- and reins -- telling the horse not to move from the spot -- he is likely to go up.

The best results come when a rider learns to take control while, at the same time, relaxing any death grip on the horse. If the rider generally rides with a stable seat, he should be able to relax his legs and pull on only one rein. In this way, the horse doesn't feel trapped, but the rider has demonstrated that he will take control of the horse's actions.

If the rider is more aware of the situation before the spook, he can often reassure the horse that he is there and in control before the horse reacts. This often prevents the spook in the first place.

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Horses are naturally spooked by things coming from behind them because they can't see directly behind themselves, as were both the truck and the other horse. If you are afraid of the horse, he will know it and you will make little progress with him. It would be better for him if someone who is not afraid of him works on his spookiness by exposing him to objects and loud noises that he is not expecting. It needs to be in a controlled space and he needs to be more reliable before being ridden outside of his comfort zone. When he is ready to be trail ridden again, it should be with a seasoned trail horse who will make him feel more confident.

If you will not ride him again, it only makes sense to sell him to someone who is willing to work with him. Just disclose the reason you are selling him.

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Thanks, believe me I was very aware when I was riding him. I saw her horse spook and spin toward us and tried to stop him from going. His bucking was like the broncs do not the normal buck. He bucked from one side of the road to the other when I came off. I was uncomfortable riding him so I am sure that didn't help anything.

I plan on selling him, but am unsure if I want my friend to have him. If I thought it was something she could work on I would let her. She loves riding him and is more confident with him than I am so maybe he would be OK with her.

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the thing with horses is that if you "anticipate" that something bad is going to happen you tense up, which causes the horse to likewise tense up. I've ridden with one of the world's foremost biomechanics experts who has sat on thousands of "problem" horses, and he says "there are no problem/crazy horses, just tense horses". a relaxed horse will not react like your horse did, but for him to be relaxed he needs a relaxed confident rider (which means a relaxed butt, leg and hand) sitting on him.

I think it's smart of you not to get back on him. as for your friend wanting to buy him, she knows the issues and is a grownup.

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I had been riding him for months by this time with no issues, but for some reason I didn't want to ride him that day. I guess I did make it worse without knowing it.

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Yeah, sometimes if you get on a horse anxious about other stuff, they'll pick up on it. There's a horse in the barn I won't ride if I've had a bad day or if my stress levels are up because he'll pick up on it, get worried, and end up shooting sideways.

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It is natural for a horse to spook in some situations-like when something suddenly popping out.

It is what that horse does after he spooks that matters. Whirling around, trying to bolt or bucking , is just not accepatble, and you need to be ablew to shut your horse down, if he tries to do so.

Your friend obviously does not have control of her horse, and when that horse suddenly spun around towards your horse, your horse could have felt like he was under attack

Two horses, both with problems, riding out together is a receipt for disaster!

Horses will feed off each other, esp if neither has strong leadership from their rider. Both horses acting nervous, refusing to go forward, had them both primed to being very reactive. and to explode.

Yes, you can fix such a horse, but you do that before you head out on the trail, so you have 'buttons'

Here is good video on different types of spooks and how to handle them

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Thanks for the videos. I won't be training him, but its good to know he can be fixed. He is really a nice horse to ride. He is very comfortable. We have had him for 10 years and he has only done this twice. I am getting to old to bronc ride and won't be riding him again.

I will practice these tips on my other horse even though he does not spook like this it will be nice to know I can have more control if he does.

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I would ask a few questions to get to a full al response.

Had you been riding the horse the days and weeks leading up to this ride or was it the first ride in awhile?

Did you do any lunging or anything to get the horses extra energy out?

If you had been riding the horse on a regular basis and took measures to get the extra energy out before this occurred I would then wonder about the future of the horse as a trail horse.

However if the horse was fresh and he hadn't been being worked then I would say the failure was on part from the handler not setting the horse up properly for success. The horse did not necessarily react in an odd Manner as they are flight animals.

There are to many variables for me to draw a conclusion from this post. But hopefully I posted some things to think about.

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A broke horse, that has full time turn out, should neither need to be ridden regularly, nor lunged, in order not to spook an then buck. Sure, that horse won't be that fit , but he should also not become 'un -trained"

Heck, hubby seldom rides his trail horse around home, and certainly not all winter, yet that horse rides fine, come spring, either down the road or on a trail. I have ridden mares after they have had several years off being broodmares, and they rode fine

Any horse will spook, given the right circumstances, BUT, a broke horse neither tries to buck afterwards, spin or tries to bolt. It is not so much the spook, but what the horse does after that spook

Smilie is well broke, thus I always ride her down the road on a loose rein, even when traffic approaches, One time,, I was riding home, again on a loose rein, when this old car approached us. Since the driver slowed down, I did not bother to take up any rein,. Just after he passed us, he gunned that motor, with that old car giving off several loud backfires. Smilie leaped ahead in several big jumps, while I was still gathering up rein, but when I said "WHOA', she stopped, and that is the difference!

Edited by Smilie

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Well my gelding who is well trained and i ride him on a loose rein,he's traffic safe and for most part not spooky. I'v had a few good scares on him spring 2013. Our second trail ride of the year, daughter rides a well trained paint gelding,who can be spooky first few rides out,well our second ride out he did his famous wheel around and leap side ways,which then spooked my horse,and the rodeo was on.

Only thing that kept my horse from taking off was he has a good one rein stop on him,got his head around to my knee and disengaged his hindquarters,shut down the bucking and got him under control.

The this spring he didn't do the spooking and bucking thing,his new deal is to get super hyper high headed and jiggy wont walk gets over re active to cues whether it be my legs or hands. Ask for a leg yield to get his mind busy and he goes flying side ways, everything i ask of him and he just goes OMG i'am going to die. I'am not a nervious rider, don't get tense and not much fazes me, i have to stay calm or my horse would come out of his skin. Last trail ride this fall he pulled this crap half way through ride, was like someone flipped a switch on him,did manage to get him calmed down talking to him.

My horses are on full time turnout but every spring, we go through this issue with both horses,ones spooky the others a jiggy high head over re active fool. And they set each other off if the spooky horse spooks,then my horse gets hot and starts jigging then mr spooky thinks omg somethings wrong so gets spookier. My daughter is like me un fazed never even gets un seated, by his spinning around and leaping side ways.

In the spring our friends don't want to ride with us imagine that... :shocked:

So even well trained can seem to act un trained in the spring ours sure do so go figure.

Edited by Jazzystar66

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Well, you barrel raced this horse.

I had that gelding, who was a former stud of ours, that i both showed in reining, cattle classes etc, and I also gamed

He was fine on trail rides UNTIL, something got him on the muscle. Then it was prance and dance. Jigging is bad enough just riding down the trail, on a day long ride, as you feel that you rode twice as far as anyone else' but coming down a mountain, with that horse not watching where he put his feet-not so much!

That is why I say a good enough rider can get any horse trail ridden, but not every horse makes a great trail horse-same as any other discipline

Classy never bucked, and on some rides, with just hubby and the kids he was often very good, BUT, there was always the chance that something would get him in prance mode, . Didn't help that his dam was a running App that I bought off the track., and who herself would revert to starting gate mode at times!

Nope, I don't trail ride those horses anymore! I trail ride horses that one can pitch slack to,a nd they will pick their way carefully down a mountain, cross a fast flowing river without trying to go their way, spook in place when grouse fly up suddenly, deer pop out of the trees, come across a herd of elk suddenly, allow me to pop a beer can on their back, that I got out of my saddle bag and go at the gait and speed I ask for, on a loose rein

We often have our horse tied up all night, where they can hear wolves howling, elk bugling, then get up and feed them before dawn, saddle up and ride off, even with a cold wind blowing down a mountain draw. That to me is a trail horse, and I used to compromise on this fact, when I was younger, rider quite a few ;idiots on trails. I changed my breeding program, and learned how much more enjoyable it is to ride a great trail horse, versus just riding a horse on a trail

Seen a few serious wreaks out west, where that rider was lucky someone witnessed it,and could call STARS, as that is often the only way to rescue someone in some of the places we trail ride

Just because a horse is highly trained in some event (s) does not necessarily make him a good trail horse. Thus, I should have included, a well trained horse with the right mind, does not need to be kept ridden, lunged etc, in order to go well on a trail

Edited by Smilie

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He's not even running bred,his sire who's now a gelding is a great trail horse calm cool and collected. I watched those videos about how to deal with spooking my gelding has all that training,when in an arena i have total body control of him. Also on the trail TILL he go's into his hot jiggy mode, then he turns re active. I can take his head away but when he's hot & jiggy that just makes his spin, when he stops he'll then walk for a short distance then its back to hot and jiggy.

As soon as he feels the rein take contact with either right side or on left he goes into the spin,and just rein isn't his cue to spin....HE knows that but when being over re active that's what he does. Maybe the feed change will help with the hot jiggy part and maybe it wont,will see come time to ride again.

It might all go back to how i first trained him as a 2 year old, did a lot of running with him,didn't do much walking....He was high geared when i started him 2nd ride he was wanting to move out...not in his bloodlines to be that way.Think i created my own monster without realising it.

I'am getting older already in my 50s in 10 years not sure i'll want to be riding such a hot horse,but by then jasper will be 23 years old sooo maybe with age he'll slow down. He's not a horse anyone can ride,my daughter can ride him,i'v let a friend ride him he scared the crap out of her....sooo she wont ever get on him again.. She told me he's nuts, i told her he's just very sensitive and highly responsive to leg, seat and rein cues. She got to riding his mouth and grabbing with her legs and it went all to heck real fast.

She told me he was nuts i was like no he's just real sensitive to leg,seat and rein cues...after that deal i haven't let anyone else ride him again. My daughter can ride him,BUT when he get's hot & jiggy she doesn't get you can't get rough with him... as in jerking his mouth...she's quick to jerk on reins. SO when he gets hot and jiggy she gets off and lets me ride him.

Yeah i'am in my 50s so i guess ten more years and i'll be wanting a calmer horse. Maybe by then jasper will be less hyper, as he will be 23 years old by then. Maybe the feed change will help with the hyper hot attitude maybe not....think its the way he's been riden over the years. Started him as a 2 year old he was very forward even then.

Almost had him jump over a 4 wheeler that came around a corner, when we were running out on the trail he was rather breakless at that time. Really amazing i didn't get hurt riding him we sure had some close calls back then.

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I've been in my share of close calls, and if there's one thing I've learned is that the crazier the horse gets the calmer you have to be. two crazies equal a train wreck. for the people reading this thread, believe it or not how tense your buttock muscles are has a huge influence on how your horse behaves. tense buttock muscles, clingy knees, hollow back and tight reins = potential explosion.

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I've been in my share of close calls, and if there's one thing I've learned is that the crazier the horse gets the calmer you have to be. two crazies equal a train wreck. for the people reading this thread, believe it or not how tense your buttock muscles are has a huge influence on how your horse behaves. tense buttock muscles, clingy knees, hollow back and tight reins = potential explosion.

Yep that is so true,friend that rode my horse did just what you described, and my horse was a spinning, leaping bucking fool. I can tell you sometimes staying calm can be real hard to do...i can stay calm but i also know its a MUST or things can escalate real fast.

Tight reins is a sure way of setting off the hot jiggy attitude in my gelding.But its hard for some people to not tighten up on reins when the horse is jigging and going side ways. When you tighten up reins you tighten up the rest of your body,that on my boy = high head jigging dancing side ways.

BUT try and tell someone who's scared to loosen up those reins and relax on a horse who's high headed jigging and now spinning around...HA all they can think is hang on for dear life...

My boy doesn't look like the hot kind to ride, looks like a dud but oh boy he comes to life once saddled and you get on.

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when a horse is hopped up and you have really understood the alternative, staying calm is what you do. otherwise you're screwed!!

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I agree that some horses , due to breeding, training, get hot, no matter what you do on a trail, but they should still not buck, spin or try to bolt

I should also clarify a bit, concerning Classy, as having run games on him, was not the total picture, far as how he could get hot on a trail ride

I started him, as a three year old stallion, and people at clinics, remarked how good he was, esp considering he was a stud

I then got pregnant with my second son, and thus sent Classy out to a local reining trainer, that a taught at the local Ag college. Unfortunately, I found out he was abusive, after the fact, and actually took him to court, over another horse. I then had many people coming forward, in support, as he either wreaked or blew their horse's mind

After I got Classy back, people made remarks that he was going better when I had him

My old reining mare, is actually a daughter of his, out of a Peppy San bred mare. She won superiors in many events-from reining, trail to cattle and games, yet she never got stupid on trail rides. I even took her on afall hunt, after she had been a broodmare for several years,and she did great

Thus, I did generalize, far as horses that have been gamed and trail riding. There are the exceptions, with a lot to do with how else they were ridden. Still, when our local light horse club went on trail rides, which included straight gymkana horses, those horses were mainly very jiggy, on the muscle, esp if they were not allowed to lead

I have you beat by more years than I like to admit, Jazzy, so would not even consider riding a horse that got stupid on trail rides!

Here is San stone Image. She also produced two ApHC world Champions (reining and working cowhorse)

AppBums.jpg

SanStone-2.jpg

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I agree with Smilie no broke horse should ever do what he did. I did not lunge him before I rode him and don't want a horse that I have to lunge before I ride. He hasn't been ridden regularly for awhile, but that is no excuse for his behavior. This horse went into a full rodeo type buck. All feet off the ground with twists and turns. I can understand being a little spooky when you first go out after time off. My other horses have never bucked or tried to bolt and they have sat in the pasture for months along with him.

I am 61 now and my husband is older and still recovering from his accident. it is vital we have safe horses. It breaks our heart to let him go but we are. I just hope we can find him a good home with someone who will work with him.

This horse can be ridden with a loose rein and he will walk calmly down the trail. It's just not knowing when or what will scare him.

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Well you have the nicest looking appys i'v ever seen,the ones iv seen are ugly headed, rat tails and have an attitude to match the ugly. Had a appy filly didn't keep her traded her off. Started her as a 3 year old and just didn't like her or her attitude, and she was a bronce,every time she was saddled she bronced like a fool. I decided 2 weeks into training i wasn't going to back her, and sent her down the road 2 weeks later,guess she turned out really good and the guy loves her to death. But she still has an attitude and will buck when she, decides she thinks it time to be done....that wouldn't fly with me.

No i don't like a bucking horse and don't like the spinning & bolting and there are times i get pretty sick of my own horse and his antics...i'v threatened to take him to sale barn. Hoping if i don't race him maybe he'll settle down that's a BIG maybe,thinks it's pretty ingrained in him now at almost 13 years old.

When he's not being hot & jiggy on trail he's awsome goes through anything mud rivers will jump up on a 3 foot high bank,the jump back down. It's just keeping him sane the entire ride that's the trick,if he leads it goes better. But i don't let him always lead, who ever rides with us gets left behind big time. He walks super fast,and got to let him if i hold him back well he gets hyper and jiggy. If i ride alone he never gets hot and jiggy, it only happens with other horses along.

There has been times we had to get home and fast because of a big thunder storm coming in. He flys down the trail going down hills and through puddles at full speed...he seems to know he can't get stupid then.

Here's a pic of him this spring we were riding and i had to hold him back so other horses could keep up...he was NOT happy and was sweated up,was 30 degrees that day. Second pic was while we were in the lead so he was calm and happy. Then him being cute yeah he has those moments.

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I agree with Smilie no broke horse should ever do what he did. I did not lunge him before I rode him and don't want a horse that I have to lunge before I ride. He hasn't been ridden regularly for awhile, but that is no excuse for his behavior. This horse went into a full rodeo type buck. All feet off the ground with twists and turns. I can understand being a little spooky when you first go out after time off. My other horses have never bucked or tried to bolt and they have sat in the pasture for months along with him.

I am 61 now and my husband is older and still recovering from his accident. it is vital we have safe horses. It breaks our heart to let him go but we are. I just hope we can find him a good home with someone who will work with him.

This horse can be ridden with a loose rein and he will walk calmly down the trail. It's just not knowing when or what will scare him.

I agree also that they should not buck like that,and when someone gets hurt that's even worse...when you never know what will set them off that's just plain scary. My gelding will buck but its sure isn't enough to dump me off,and i can shut him down from bucking too. He's past the bucking part now he just gets hot and hyper then jiggs,but i don't feel unsafe on him. I'd say a handful of times i felt not safe, when he was super hyper jigging going side ways, and we had to go down a bank to cross a river.

He managed to do it without falling amazing enough,but i just stayed relaxed and gave him his head....my daughter was going OMG mom he's going to get you killed....Get off and lead the dumb fool,i said nope he'll be fine daughter was like your nuts.

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I think this is a good time to point out based on all these stories that there is no "bit" in the world that will control a hopped up, prancing horse except for a "bit"of savvy. foundation, foundation, foundation, and not just on the horse. if the rider has an out of control seat, legs and hand, the horse better be beyond dead broke or it's a formula for trouble.

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I think this is a good time to point out based on all these stories that there is no "bit" in the world that will control a hopped up, prancing horse except for a "bit"of savvy. foundation, foundation, foundation, and not just on the horse. if the rider has an out of control seat, legs and hand, the horse better be beyond dead broke or it's a formula for trouble.

Very true

You don't have to come off though, on a horse that gets hyped up on the trail, in order to get hurt, because if that horse goes down with you, over a bank, into a bad part of the river, does not matter as to how good your seat or legs are!

No big deal if a horse jigs on a wide trail, beyond being annoying, but a very big deal if he jigs, on a narrow schale trail, with a drop off where you can say the entire Lord's prayer on the way down!

I will just give you on example, where a cool headed horse saved my 'bacon'

I was riding Hubby's trail horse, Frankie, who was actually race bred, but never raced. He was an excellent trail horse all his life. We were on a BigHorn trophy sheep hunt, thus way above the treeline, in a frozen narrow trail, only dedicated hunters ride, that went up and down on very steep switchbacks. On one side was the sloping upside rock face, and on the other side, a long, long drop off. Frankie fell to his knees, and if he had scrambled, we would have been over that edge . Instead, he just knelt there, and assessed the situation. I got off on the off side, against the rock slope, and then Frankie carefully rocked back, getting his front feet under him

Okay, one more example, as it includes Einstein, the horse that still has place in my heart, no other horse, even Smilie will ever have. This is the horse I trained, as a three year old, while on chemo, who won many events and took me on numerous mountain rides

Anyway, we were on an early spring ride, and Einstein at that point, had not crossed many rivers, esp when they were up. He also had an area on one back foot that was vulnerable to injury, having torn out a hunk of coronary band and hoofwall as a two year old, which left a permanent scar area, where that coronary band had been. Thus, I committed the' NO no,' crossing a fast flowing river, looking down in places, so that I could try to prevent Einstein from hurting that leg on some sharp boulder. If you have ever crossed a river like that, you know how easy it is to get disorientated,if you don't keep your eyes fixed on that opposite bank, tot he point you get dizzy, and can no longer tell if you are moving forward or drifting

Anyway, hubby, who was ahead of me , on Frankie, suddenly shouted. I saw in horror that Einstein and I had drifted down river from the crossing, and ahead of me, should my horse panic, and try to climb it, was an impossible steep bank. INstead, Einstein obeyed, when I asked him to turn up river, against the current, and head for the crossing, almost going down several times ,a s we crossed huge under water boulders

Nope, a good seat won't help you in some of those places, and why, having had some possible serious wreaks, riding horses out there that 'lost it', I no longer ride such horses on on trails, as I continue to enjoy riding tough trails, where you need a horse you can trust 100% of the time

Edited by Smilie

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yikes.

my intent was only to point out to anyone who might be following this thread that a "bit" is not the solution for a myriad of behavioral problems. from what you've written Frankie and Einstein had solid foundations on them, which is the key to safety and performance for horse and rider and not a bigger bit.

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yikes.

my intent was only to point out to anyone who might be following this thread that a "bit" is not the solution for a myriad of behavioral problems. from what you've written Frankie and Einstein had solid foundations on them, which is the key to safety and performance for horse and rider and not a bigger bit.

Totally agree, and something I have pointed out both here and on another site I frequent

Bits don't control horses, and

;the obstacle is not the obstacle' So often people try to desensitize their horse to everything possible under the sun, trying to create a .bomb proof trail horse, or teach the horse to trailer load, ect.

A horse will always encounter something he has never seen before, and that is when body control, respect and trust come in, versus just hoping you 'desensitized that horse to that particular obstacle

A horse that truly loads, believe 100% in that forward cue, also loads into a trailer, as he does not question as to where he will, or will not lead. He also goes through that mud hole, even though he can't see bottom, as he trusts in your leadership

Far as bit, I do trail ride with a bit, and not bittless, so I guess i'm not a 'purist. While I know I can ride my horses in a halter, have shown quite a few of them in a bosal, I like to ride with a bit. Most of the time, my horse is just packing that bit on a loose rein, but should 's....t hit the fan, like coming suddenly across a bear, I know I am just that much better taking a horse's head away with a bit, than with a bosal

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I'd NEVER ride my gelding in a bosal to trail ride,never know when he'll decide to get hot....i don't even ride him bitless at home. I have body control on him but i like to have a bit in his mouth. There's times when he WONT give his head so i can take it away,so requires giving that rein a jerk to get his attention.

We'v run into bear before had my horse not been in a bit,i wouldn't of been able to take his head away,had to jerk that rein pretty hard to get him to give it.. If we do any kind of running and he's not in lead, he can get on the muscle and the bit comes in handy to remind him, hey i'am still here listen to me.

I wont ride him bareback he can loose you in a hurry,gets rather squirrely then gets hot,so i skip doing bareback on him,don't like falling off..

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I used to ride the horses in form pasture and down to water on camp trips bareback with a halter, but that was before knee replacements and even before my knees got really bad. Even if I could get on from a stump,, my knees just could not take any jolt getting off, and even with a saddle, I had a unique way of dismounting, if I had no substitute mounting block. I would sort of swing the off leg over, then sort of slide down the back side of my horse. Friends met a Parelli discipline out west, riding in a halter.When the group she was riding with , suggested she might like to use a snaffle, her reply was, 'there are better ways of doing things'

Long story short, they came across a herd of elk, and that horse bolted and bucked her off.She had to be air lifted out. Yes, she still might have lost control with a snaffle, But I know for a fact, that I have ridden so much more, and started horses in a snaffle, that it has become a 'familiar tool' for me, if nothing else.

I never jerk on a horse, but will take hold, and use my legs if needed.

I also know, that lf horsemen, that did work horses in a bosal, on the way up to that Spade bit eventually, taught that horse the double, to mentally convince the horse that he could be controlled in that bosal. It is very easy for a horse to run through a bosal, esp if that rider panics and uses a steady pull on both reins.

Thus, part of that bosal training, was to let that horse run on a loose rein, and then to suddenly pull him around in his tracks, with one side of that mecate.

I went to a reining clinic once, riding my three year old in a bosal. The instructor, who in fact shows jr working cowhorses in a bosal, told me to take it off and use a snaffle, as I would get more done

I watched a clinic, given by Les Vogt, a legend in working cowhorse and hackamore reinsmanship.

His horses are first started and going very well in a snaffle, before, and not after, they are put in a bosal

I could make my horses look pretty good, showing them as jr horses in a bosal, esp just going down the rail, but I had them first broke in a snaffle

Edited by Smilie

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This is my main trial horse now, Carmen.

We came across this herd of elk, about her second trip into the mountains, and she just looked at them

CARMENeLK.jpg

easy slope, but still, as you can see, I can totally trust her.

Carmenlooptrail.jpg

By boy Einstein, up on ahigh ridge,, holding Frankie

einsteinpowderface.jpg

Usual bit i trail ride Carmen with-she likes it, and I hardly ever have to take up any bit contact

Carmen%20bit_zpsabtyjbqq.jpg

Carmen%20Big%20Red_zpslywahvld.jpg

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That mouthpiece on that bit looks like the one I ride my husband's horse in. I always ride him with a bit, but I very seldom ride my mare or gelding in one. All we have ever done with our horses is trail ride.

Smilie you have the most beautiful trails. Where I live it's all flat land.

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