gisles

Bucking When Spooked

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Jazzy, yes Charlie is an odd name for a girl. Her registered name is actually Awarded with love. Her dam was a mare I owned (great horse, also dam of my Einstein and many more good horses ) Her name was Irish Love BUg (scooter Bug G X Irish Mister ) Her sire, by transported semen is Awarded.

My daughter in law loved giving all the foals their barn name, and thus called her Charla. I never could get used to that, so called her Charlie instead!

Back to topic! Here is what I mean, about being able to ask for a horse's face, with a bit, very lightly, and I do it by slightly bumping the sides, and taking up slight rein contact. Note that I do not have any tight bit contact, but Carmen has given me her face, very softly

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If that alone is a reason I like to trial ride with a bit, I'm sticking to it!. I've ridden and trained horses with bits long enough, producing horses with very soft giving, happy in those bits, no , gaping mouth, chewing ect or other resistance,, that I find riding with a halter redundant.Others can well feel different

In fact, to me, when I see a western horse,older than 5, that still needs to be ridden two handed, in a snaffle, I see lack of training and education

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pssst! jazzy, we go off topic all the time, it's what we do best!!

True, but hey, at least we have livened up this dead board some!

Back to bucking when spooked.

There are times any horse will spook, spooks you can't really prevent, as when a deer suddenly pops out of the bush directly in front of you

But, it is absolutely not okay if that horse then decides to spin, bolt or buck. If you have a horse that does that, he needs not just to have you control the situation, ride it out, but to get after him, not for the spook, but that attempted follow up of a buck or bolt

That is when I spur those hips around as a punishment/negative consequence, making the wrong thing hard. If the horse spins into the opposite direction, get that shoulder back in the direction he was going, using you foot ahead of that cinch, up near his shoulder. Once facing the direction he was, tell the horse whoa, and let him sit there and think about it

Same for a bucking horse, get hold of that head and really spur those hips around.

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I agree if still be ridden two handed by 5 that is a lack of training,both my geldings i was riding one handed by 3 year old year latest. My mare was a real hard one to find a bit for.

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True, but hey, at least we have livened up this dead board some!

Back to bucking when spooked.

There are times any horse will spook, spooks you can't really prevent, as when a deer suddenly pops out of the bush directly in front of you

But, it is absolutely not okay if that horse then decides to spin, bolt or buck. If you have a horse that does that, he needs not just to have you control the situation, ride it out, but to get after him, not for the spook, but that attempted follow up of a buck or bolt

That is when I spur those hips around as a punishment/negative consequence, making the wrong thing hard. If the horse spins into the opposite direction, get that shoulder back in the direction he was going, using you foot ahead of that cinch, up near his shoulder. Once facing the direction he was, tell the horse whoa, and let him sit there and think about it

Same for a bucking horse, get hold of that head and really spur those hips around.

I'v had times when horse has spooked bolted & bucked but could at time only get it under control,was no room for making him spin the hips around. I have made do with no room to spin them around, and made that horse go backwards real fast and give that head vertically & laterally because that was only way, to let them know bucking & bolting wasn't allowed.

My daughters horse spent a lot of time have those hips kicked around in both directions for bolting he now knows when i take that head away,IF he bolted or bucked those hips will BE kicked around. BUT not until i ask with leg DON'T want them just moving hips because i took head away.

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Even though I ride without a bit I can ride them with one. They way that horse bucked was no way I could get hold of anything and he did have a bit.

I'll find some pictures from some of our rides and post them. Where I live it's flat, lots of marsh land and we can ride on the beach.

I think my bucking bronc has found a home. I will know in a couple of days, but I think he is going to college.

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great, if you found anew home, where your horse can get the kind of riding he needs, while you stay safe!

One of my favorite quotes, from an article in Horse and rider, is to know when you should 'divorce your horse' Many people have accepted the fact that marriage does not need to mean for life, sticking it out, and there are times parting makes sense, and both partners free to find more suitable mates

For some reason, some people feel guilty if they don't use that same logic, concerning their horse. Riding has to be fun, When you are apprehensive getting on a horse-where is the fun?

That horse might just need a confident rider, to bring out his potential, while you need a horse to give you confidence. It is a win , win situation for both of you!

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One of my favorite quotes, from an article in Horse and rider, is to know when you should 'divorce your horse'

Riding has to be fun, When you are apprehensive getting on a horse-where is the fun?

That horse might just need a confident rider, to bring out his potential, while you need a horse to give you confidence. It is a win , win situation for both of you!

This is exactly what I did when I rehomed Naciemento and got Reina. N was far too 'hot' of a horse for me and Reina restored my riding confidence!

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Sorry - yeah, I meant if I have to have one or the other, I'd rather deal with hot than lazy.

Although it's amazing how many "hot" horses calm right down with only fairly minor changes. In fact, one of the hottest horses I've ever known was cured by his new owner - she put him in a milder bit. Or in some cases it is, yes, the rider. Horses that are hot because they are anxious often talk inexperienced riders into taking their legs completely away from the horse's side. This makes an anxious horse more anxious - they like that physical contact for reassurance - and rapidly becomes a downward spiral of anxious horse + anxious rider = terrified horse + terrified rider.

(Which is relevant - if your horse is spooking and jumping, whatever you do keep your leg on him and ride him forward).

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Agree that it often can be the rider that makes a horse hot.

While I will concede that some barrel horses might actually like to run those patterns, more get hot outside that entry gate because the have learned to associate running patterns with pain, with riders using severe curbs, gags, in combo with tiedowns, and spurs or crop or both for that run home

It is also true that it is easier to speed a horse up, then to try and slow a horse that always wants to be fast

A horse that has not learned to relax, to trust a rider's hands, is going to be over reactive, and unless that horse learns to relax, he is always going to want to do everything fast

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I found a cure for that. rode my hot point to point welsh bred tb in a clover leaf pattern at a hand gallop until he asked me if maybe he could slow down just a tad. riding hot horses in patterns can work wonders if you do it long enough for them to "ask" if they can change this habitual behavior.

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I found a cure for that. rode my hot point to point welsh bred tb in a clover leaf pattern at a hand gallop until he asked me if maybe he could slow down just a tad. riding hot horses in patterns can work wonders if you do it long enough for them to "ask" if they can change this habitual behavior.

Yes, and that is a method some people use, to have horse slow down in alope- keep making them go, when they show signs of wanting to slow. Same idea when you hold a horse down, that uses dropping to the ground when balking, thus taking away his ability to get back up, slow down, on his own

It does work in some cases, but it can also create horse you have to ride down longer and longer, as that horse gets more fit

Ride enough colts, and you might run into one that tries to buck, after a spook, but the idea is to have body control on a young horse before riding him out, that you are able to prevent either a buck or a bolt, after a true spook

A broke horse, no matter the temperament, should not try to either whirl around, try to bolt or buck, after a spook.

Any horse can have a true fear spook, when something without any warning, pops out of the bush. You are not going to prevent those types of spooks, except have the horse dampen his reaction, to the point of spooking in place.

However, what you can, and must prevent, and make clear to the horse as to what is not an option, is to try and `leave the country`or buck after a spook

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I just thought of all the times I've had horses spook--none of them ever bucked while doing it.

My daughters horse NEVER bucks when spooked he just bolts forward or goes flying sideways. On the other hand my gelding likes to buck or leap around as in crow hop. He doesn't buck now i put a stop to that nonsense got better body control on him.

I found a cure for that. rode my hot point to point welsh bred tb in a clover leaf pattern at a hand gallop until he asked me if maybe he could slow down just a tad. riding hot horses in patterns can work wonders if you do it long enough for them to "ask" if they can change this habitual behavior.

I'v tried that with my gelding when he get's HOT he can go and go and go for hours and NEVER slow or even ask to slow down. He's like a energizer bunny just keeps on going. He can be drenched in sweat from head to toe and just keeps right on going.

I'v brought him home from rides where he was huffing like a freight train.... dripping sweat from head to toe,take a short break get back on and he's FIRED UP and ready to go full speed. When he's fit and muscled he doesn't tire out, can ride 8 hours and a hard ride lots of long trotting & galloping and he can still be HOT & JIGGY

Farrier i fired this summer couldn't believe we split metal shoes in half in 4 weeks...she didn't believe we rode our horses hard and daily either until she came back 6 weeks later and shoes were GONE. Then she went to a 4 week schedule,said she had alot of customers tell her they ride a lot but yet shoes, could be re set 4 different times or even more.

Edited by Jazzystar66

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The ride them until they want to stop and then keep going method is not something I use on hot horses. It's something I use on horses that take off to get out of work. There's a difference.

The hot horse I'm working on right now was made hot by bad riding. We're talking a horse that when she arrived would try to kill anyone who got between her and food, no exaggeration, and still gives you the dirtiest looks for it. She would also spook when I raised my hand to my face (I wear glasses), spook if she heard a whip being used on another horse, spook at anything that sounded like a whip being used, and routinely just take off with riders and not stop. It's taken consistent work (by different people because this, sadly, isn't MY horse...if I had the time/money and she was a little bigger, I'd make an offer on her) to get her to act like a horse not a bundle of anxiety terrified of her rider. And guess what? She no longer jigs, she's still a tad spooky, and she hasn't tried to take off with me in weeks. I still do need to convince her that there is not a horse eating monster outside the back door of the arena. Unfortunately, the door is now closed, which means that will have to start over in the spring :P. But I dread to think what would happen if somebody got on her carrying a whip or wearing spurs...

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Joe left today to go to the University of Georgia. He will be ridden 5days a week. I think he will do well with consistent riding. The students only ride in the arena.

Joe has only bucked like that twice in the 10 years we have owned him. The first time a truck came speeding up from behind. Scared him to death. Then this last time.

Joe is not a hot horse. He will ride nicely on a loose rein. He does have a lot of energy and we would take them out trail riding for hours. He will test a rider so he needs an experienced one. I know it doesn't sound like it, but he is a nice horse and we are going to miss him.

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Joe left today to go to the University of Georgia. He will be ridden 5days a week. I think he will do well with consistent riding. The students only ride in the arena.

Joe has only bucked like that twice in the 10 years we have owned him. The first time a truck came speeding up from behind. Scared him to death. Then this last time.

Joe is not a hot horse. He will ride nicely on a loose rein. He does have a lot of energy and we would take them out trail riding for hours. He will test a rider so he needs an experienced one. I know it doesn't sound like it, but he is a nice horse and we are going to miss him.

It's not easy to see them go,but i honestly think it was a good thing...not everyone wants to deal with a horse who could be set off and buck them off. Don't think i could sell my gelding it'd be real tough to do, i give you credit for selling your horse there are times, one has to know when to let them go on to a new home.

Do you have a horse to replace joe that's safe and trustworthy trail mount??

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I 'divorced' my horse of 5 years about 18 months ago after working with her consistently and realizing she needed more than I could give and that I really never felt 100% confident on her. She has a great new home, which makes me feel better about the whole thing. The first ride when I tried out my new horse felt great - we cantered around and around and he was smooth as silk, more whoa than go and just what I needed. My confidence has soared in the last 18 months, he's the perfect partner for me and I feel so blessed to have found this horse. Riding is now fun, which is what it should be. My 'divorce' was one of the best decisions I have made!

(My photo is my old horse, can't get any new photos uploaded on here!)

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I 'divorced' my horse of 5 years about 18 months ago after working with her consistently and realizing she needed more than I could give and that I really never felt 100% confident on her. She has a great new home, which makes me feel better about the whole thing. The first ride when I tried out my new horse felt great - we cantered around and around and he was smooth as silk, more whoa than go and just what I needed. My confidence has soared in the last 18 months, he's the perfect partner for me and I feel so blessed to have found this horse. Riding is now fun, which is what it should be. My 'divorce' was one of the best decisions I have made!

(My photo is my old horse, can't get any new photos uploaded on here!)

Great story, Magic!

There was a time I rode any horse on trail rides,including that mare off the track, but once I rodes horses, that I raised myself, that are forward, sane and ones you know are not going to blow when the un expected happens, ones you can trust with your young children, 'making do' with less does not make sense

Those horses, that never become great trail horses, the type that have'experienced rider needed', attached to their ads, as with any other discipline, are more suited for another job

Just like most any athletic horse can do many events, at a certain level, so can most horses be trail ridden, but to excel at any event, a horse has to be bred with some attribute towards that event.

Most people accept that truth, when it comes to performance events, but do not likewise recognize that there are horses bred and trained to becoming trail horses above and beyond other horses

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Tell me about it, Smillie.

This girl is Babe, who belongs to Anchor D Ranch.

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Sire: Foundation Quarter Horse. Dam: proven Belgian teamster mare. It's not clear from the picture, but she's an honest sixteen hands. Built like the side of a brick barn.

I rode this horse on a seven day moving trip in 2008. Best trail horse I have ever had the pleasure to get up on. A little on the slow side - she got all of her dam's speed, as it were. But amazing stamina, perfect temperament, right balance of honesty and affection. She is also, no coincidence, one of only two animals (the other was a very nice saddle mule) I've ridden that were bred solely and entirely to be trail horses.

Her colt in the picture is two days old, nicknamed "Moose." He's by a foundation Quarter Horse and has also been bred to be a trail horse. He'll make a fine gelding.

There are a lot of people, those same "competition" types who would argue neither of these horses should exist. They're not purebred. Neither Babe's dam nor Babe had any kind of a show record.

I rode this mare for five hours in rough terrain ending with a one mile gallop. She came into camp ears pricked, ready for more. I was another story!

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Joe was my husbands horse. I was only riding him to keep him ridden after we sent him off for 30 days. My husband is unable to ride now. We are hoping he will be able to eventually. He was in a very bad accident in 2014 and spent about 8 months in the hospital. I have three other horses that we can ride. I would never let him get on that horse again.

It was hard, but we know where he is and can check on him. If he doesn't work out for them we can get him back if we want.

ShamelessDQ she sounds like a good horse. That is all I want a good trail horse.

Heidi N Q - I wish I was closer I would go visit him. I am about 4 hours away. I live in SE GA on the coast about 20 minutes from the Florida line.

I tried to load pictures, but for some reason I am unable to. You would think they would make it easier on here to load a picture. I can never remember how.

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