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gisles

Giving Oral Antiobiotic

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One of my horses has an infection in her hoof. She has had recurring problems with her right front. The vet took x-rays and said she still had infection and it looked like it was starting in the bone. She prescribed me a strong antibiotic Chloramphenicol. I have to give her 40ml 3 times a day for 7 days. This stuff is so strong I have to wear gloves and protective clothing.

My question is do you think I could try mixing it with feed to get her to take it? I don't know how I am going to get this down her. Any suggestions to make it easier? I just know with the issues I have worming her I will have this all over me and little in her.

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If it's that strong, it's doubtful she will eat it. Sounds like you will need one of those worming bridle thingies, since you won't likely be able to retrain her in time for the antibiotic.

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Never mind--you said it was in ml. I used to have to give my horse milk of magnesia. I tried the cherry flavor and he loved it. After that, all I had to do to medicate him was mix it in with the milk of magnesia and squirt it in his mouth with a syringe. I give my present horse antibiotics or bute by mixing it with honey. You might have to do it a few times without the meds until he is looking forward to the sweet stuff and doesn't resist. It might also help you with worming.

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I do have one of those halter things somewhere. I guess I better look for it. The antibiotic is apple flavored, but I have never given anything like this. I am so afraid I will get it on me. She has to take 40ml at a time and they gave me this little 5ml syringe to get it out with. It is not going to be a fun week.

I do need to get her to take her wormer better, but we always put it in their feed and have no problems that way.

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Get the long rubber gloves, an old coat, safety glasses and a dust mask and go for it. I don't blame you--I'd be afraid of it too! I think you need to get a larger syringe.

Edited by jubal

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I'll look for a larger syringe tomorrow when I buy gloves. I just hope this works to get rid of this once and for all. We have been fighting abscesses for about 3 years now.

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i would not give it orally!

In fact, most times it is given IV,as it can cause serious tissue damage, should it go inter tissue

'GI disturbances can develop in all non-ruminant animals treated with oral chloramphenicol. Use in neonatal calves leads to a malabsorption syndrome associated with ultrastructural and functional changes of the small-intestinal enterocytes. Anorexia and depression have been seen in cats treated for >1 wk.

Precautions

Some humans who are exposed to chloramphenicol develop rare cases of aplastic anemia that can cause permanent damage to the bone marrow and is not reversible. For this reason, gloves and masks should be worn when handling the drug, and it should be used only in a well-ventilated location with extreme caution. Some veterinarians will not prescribe this drug because of liability concerns.

Chloramphenicol crosses the placenta and is present in the mare's milk. Since it may affect the bone marrow of the fetus, it should be used only when benefits clearly outweigh the risks.

IM injections cause pain and are contraindicated in horses.

Chloramphenicol is not FDA approved for use with horses. It is accepted practice to use this drug with appropriate warning and precautions for human handlers. It is a prescription drug and U.S. federal law restricts this drug to use by or on lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian.

Chloramphenicol is forbidden in any drug-free competition, but is not restricted for horses showing under the therapeutic substance rules. It is important to check with the proper regulatory group.

Edited by Smilie

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Even if there is oral application in horses, I would not be handling this drug that way, for my own safety, and when my horse had potamic horse fever, the drug was given IV by my vet

'Chloramphenicol is a broad spectrum antibiotic and is used for a variety of infections in horses including anaerobic infections. This drug is widely distributed throughout the body, is broken down by the liver, and eliminated through the kidneys. Side effects of chloramphenicol include allergic reactions and negative effects on blood cells such as anemia. It is also important for humans to wear gloves when administering this medication because chloramphenicol has been documented to cause aplastic anemia in humans.

If nothing else, there is the fact that oral, versus IV, might not give adequate levels to be effective

harmacological disposition of chloramphenicol was studied in horses. Minimum levels of the antibiotic (greater than or equal to 5 mu g/ml) in blood or plasma recommended to combat infections could not be achieved by 4.4 and 8.8 mg/kg I.V. or 30 and 50 mg/kg I.M. or 30 mg/kg oral (as palmitate salt) doses of chloramphenicol. Increasing the dose to 19.8 and 26.4 mg/kg I.V. provided such levels for about two and three hours respectively. A combination of 20 mg/kg I.V. and 30 mg/kg I.M. administered simultaneously did not provide more prolonged levels than 26.4 mg/kg I.V. alone. Chloramphenicol succinate produced higher but not more prolonged levels in blood and plasma than those produced by pure chloramphenicol. Succinate salt is very little, if at all, bound to red blood corpuscles. Plasma half life and the apparent volume of distribution of chloramphenicol in horses were determined as 0.98 hours and 0.92 L/kg, respectively. At 5-10 mu g/ml concentrations in equine plasma approximately 30 percent of the chloramphenicol is bound to plasma proteins. From these studies it is concluded that the biological half life of chloramphenicol may be too short for therapeutic application against systemic infections in horses.

Edited by Smilie

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Get the long rubber gloves, an old coat, safety glasses and a dust mask and go for it. I don't blame you--I'd be afraid of it too! I think you need to get a larger syringe.

be aware that you might have to change both the form and the dose, giving it orally

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Thanks Smile. It didn't seem to bother her except for the fact that she hates taking it. I bought an ez wormers and have given it that way. The directions do say to use gloves and not get any on me. Surprisingly I have not had a problem with it making a mess and 40ml is a lot at one time.

My horse was getting chronic abscesses in this hoof and x-rays showed she still had an infection in the hoof and she thought it looked like it was going in the bone. The vet said this was a good antibiotic and would be better that the shots.I don't like giving this and had I known it was so dangerous I would have seen if there was another drug I could give. Not to mention how expensive it was.

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Just an update. We managed to get through the week and she is doing great. Has not been lame since. I am having her trimmed every four weeks to keep her toes backed up. Time will tell if she stays sound, but I am hopeful.

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