eskinmad

Looking At A Prospect Barrel And Pole Horse.

Recommended Posts

I am looking at a barrel prospect and have my eye on a cutting bred and trained roan mare. She is 5 but I noticed she has long pasterns and I'm concerned it may be a problem in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I don't care for how far apart her front pastern and shoulder angles are. Is it just me, or does the shoulder angle in the 2nd pic match the rein laying over her neck? That looks too upright to allow for a comfortable and far-reaching stride.

However, keep in mind that many horses with perceived conformational challenges perform beyond what we think will limit them. How does she ride?

Edited by Heidi n Q

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why are you thinking about buying a cutting bred and trained horse to run barrels with? very different action.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have a picture of her naked? I can't judge her top line properly with the saddle on.

From what I see, though, I would keep looking.

Her shoulder looks to be almost vertical - again, it would be easier to judge stripped. She has a heavy head on a thin neck.

Her croup is nice and level, but she's either been bred a couple of times or she has a bit of a grass belly which, put together with the thin neck might indicate that she needs some legging up. Can't judge the heartgirth with a saddle on.

Her pasterns look weak, but her hoof size (often a problem in QHs) is different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like cutting bred horses because they're "cowy" or however you say it. They're easier to train for barrels because they already work off of their hind end.

I will look for a "naked" picture of her - but my biggest concern is the pasterns. They're just long and angled strangely to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they're "cowy" yes. which means they are taught to start, stop and turn very quickly. I think barrel patterns are the opposite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pic might be at a totally bad angle, but I don't like any of her leg structure, from those pics

Her front pasterns almost looked dropped and her back legs look posty.

Far as breeding, does not make sense to try and re -invent the wheel. Look how those horses winning in barrels are bred.Any horse can learn to work off his back end, with the right conformation.

For pole bending, you need both an athletic horse, and a good lead changer Barrel racing requires a horse capable of short bursts of speed, one able to find that pocket around that barrel and then accelerate on the straight.

Those horses that have excelled, are not cutting bred, but running bred AQHA horses, Like Frenchman's Guy. I recently googled some barrel sires, and many had a good deal of Easy Jet in them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they're "cowy" yes. which means they are taught to start, stop and turn very quickly. I think barrel patterns are the opposite.

Cutting horses, that are used in the show pen, are very 'feely', but many have been bred down in size and bone so much, that they can't hold a cow, , like a working ranch horse has to at times. Thus, working ranch horses have had some TB bred into them , for size. I once listened to the breeding program of the Bar 6666(hope I have the right number of 6 ! )

A show pen cutter is bred for agility, able to get down face to face with that cow, and sweep sideways to block that cow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like cutting bred horses because they're "cowy" or however you say it. They're easier to train for barrels because they already work off of their hind end.

I will look for a "naked" picture of her - but my biggest concern is the pasterns. They're just long and angled strangely to me.

Yes, those pasterns don't match the shoulder, and they also look dropped to me. Her back legs also look posted legged

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now