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Bluesma

Mud Fever And Eosin?

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Sorry if this has already been discussed a lot, as a common problem in winter- I used the search function and didn't find reference to the particular treatment I want to ask about!

This winter is the first my horse has spent outdoors 24/7. It is the first time I have had to deal with a big inflamed patch of mud fever on her pastern and coronet.

I washed and dried it as best as I could, used antiseptic, took off as much of the scabs as I could, and as a last thought, splashed Eosin all over it.

I can't even find much reference to this substance in english except in use as a dye.

In Europe it is commonly marketed and used as an antiseptic- anti-fungal, used for drying out wounds. It is prescribed for putting on the belly button of newborns, for example, to help it dry and fall off; it is put on kids scratches and scrapes... that is why I happened to have some in my medicine cabinet.

I was having trouble meeting up with the owner of the pasture, to discuss moving her into a dry stall for healing, so she was stuck out in deep mud for the days following that one treatment, so I was very worried three days later when I went to see her...

But the inflammation had gone down, the open part had shrunk to about half the size it had been, and it was very dry. The contrast was so striking, I suspect the owner of the pasture is going to think I exaggerated the state she was in!

So it seems eosin is a good treatment, but I am curious as to why there is no mention of it when I Google it?

Has anyone else heard of it or used it?

Could there be a reason it isn't used normally? (like that there is some side effect that is dangerous..)

I'd appreciate any feedback I can get... thanks in advance!

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I am only familiar with using Eosin as a dye, in the lab Here is some info:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eosin

I am more familiar with another dye,often used in fungal infections, Gentian Violet, found in many topical any fungal preps, both human and animal

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-4397/gentian-violet-topical/details

first I have heard of Eosin, used in a similar manner

Far as mud fever, also known by several other layman's term, like scratches, various organisms that gain entery when the skin layer is breached, can be the cause of that secondary infection.

It can be caused by bacteria, fungus , a mixture of the two, and even viral Thus, there are many home remedies for it, and some work in a particular case and some do not, depending on the causative organisms involved

One of the simplest remedy I have used , that worked on some cases, ws lard mixed with sulphur

I would be curious to know medications that use Eosin, as I am totally unfamiliar with that application!

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Here is what I found on Eosin , as a disinfectant. Seems it is more of a drying agent, versus an effective disinfectant, and thus the reason it is not used often here as one

'Eosin

Antiseptic with limited effectiveness, but useful as a drying agent. Its aqueous solutions are easily contaminated by pathogenic bacteria'

From the following link"

http://www.nzdl.org/gsdlmod?e=d-00000-00---off-0fnl2.2--00-0----0-10-0---0---0direct-10---4-------0-1l--11-en-50---20-about---00-0-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-10-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&cl=CL2.2&d=HASHebbe0a42

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Here is what I found on Eosin , as a disinfectant. Seems it is more of a drying agent, versus an effective disinfectant, and thus the reason it is not used often here as one

'Eosin

Antiseptic with limited effectiveness, but useful as a drying agent. Its aqueous solutions are easily contaminated by pathogenic bacteria'

From the following link"

http://www.nzdl.org/gsdlmod?e=d-00000-00---off-0fnl2.2--00-0----0-10-0---0---0direct-10---4-------0-1l--11-en-50---20-about---00-0-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-10-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&cl=CL2.2&d=HASHebbe0a42

Okay... thanks! I did treat it with antiseptics too... the drying effect was really helpful though. I have seen some mentions of people using sulphur, that makes sense topically, but I have also seen some mention of feeding it to the horses as well...?? Have you ever done that or know anything about it's effectiveness?

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We also apply sulfur to the scratches. I am not a fan of Furazon (sp?) but to get the scabs off, at night you can slather Furazon on and then wrap the legs with plastic wrap and vet wrap overnight which makes a heat/sweat wrap, and they come right off the next morning, then you can treat with sulfur or other topical ointments. We sometimes mix the sulfur and Desitin to treat and repel water and rinsing the legs with Listerine has worked really well with one of our horses.

Best of luck with your horse!

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Thing is, because scratches (mud fever ) is just a general term, like colic, and can have several causes and infectious organisms, not all cases respond to the same treatment

Here, scratches occurs in fall, when there is dew on high grass and weeds like thistles, and sunlight, as white legs are more affected, due to photosensitization, then combined with those irritants

Removing scabs, so any topical treatment can get tot he infection, is common protocol, but from there, people have found various remedies to work, some being anti fungal and some a combo of antibacterial and anti fungal. Sometimes an anti inflamatory is added

Thus, people have had success, using a broad spectrum of home remedies, from zinc ointment to athletes foot powder, antibiotic creams mixed with anti fungal creams . Sometimes, none of those work,on a really bad case, where the infection has gotten into deep tissue. You then have to also use systemic antibiotics

Mild cases here, on horses that I don't show, clear up all by themselves, soon as winter sets in, or those weeds are dead.

Far as feeding sulphur, I know of some poeple doing that to deter flies in the summer. Not sure if it works

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