Proud Dad

Hoof Problems

Recommended Posts

    Is there a environment that can cause problem with horses having abscess hooves?  I have a quarter horse that has had alot of problems with abscess on feet,  I've had him 10 years, he had same problem with previous owner, as we used the same farrier, keeping him shod on front feet seems to prevent alot of problems.  Now I just bought a new horse in May, & he is just recently had abscess on front foot, so I was wondering if certain conditions could exist that cause this to be a bigger problem.  My pasture is nothing but a thinned out woods, & is rocky, but it was thinned out 30 plus years ago, only been in the last 5 years that there was enough grass on it, to support my 3 horses for the summer.  Didn't have problem years ago when pasture had many more obstacles in itf or horses to navigate, now it is fairly free of obstacles, it can be wet at times, but horses have runin shelter where surface is always dry,  Any info would be appreciated.  Thanks PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they are doing much running on the rocks, they can get stone bruises which will sometimes abscess. You might try a feed type hoof supplement which will grow a stronger hoof. And you won't like this one--clean the hooves daily and spray them with vinegar. It's a cheap way to get harder hooves. I stopped doing it for a few months because of an injured shoulder. My horse now has chipped feet for the first time in ten years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jubal,

 

       I've tried the hoof supplements, they can get spendy, & farrier tells me they can work, but work from hair line down & can take a months before you see results. The vinegar  treatment sounds interesting. It was my TWH gelding that had abscess, & he will walk on shoulder of road that is often crushed gravel, & his walk can be quite fast, that could have bearing his abscess. My pasture is rocky, but considerable less than it used to be, most of the old stumps are even gone. Thanks  PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be the gravel when you ride him out. Maybe try pads under his shoes? But then they'd have to be pulled if he did get another abscess. Try the vinegar. Do it while he's eating in the morning. It only takes a few minutes if you have a cooperative horse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pictures would be great. A shoe won't prevent an abscess and it depends on where that abscess is, that will tell why and how it formed....like overgrown bars, frog out of work, thrush, diet imbalance, trim imbalance, too much alfalfa, IR or Cushings, too much or too little selenium, too much sugar, starch and iron. Some things on the hoof can be weak and let the ground hurt it. Some things can be prominent and meet the ground head on for a double whammy. Somethings are internal and metabolic and they are all related. You need good balanced nutrition to grow a strong hoof. You need to fight thrush because nothing can develop and strengthen when thrush is eating the hoof away at the same time. You need a good balanced trim and maintain it. You need to move to work that trim and develop strength. 4" deep gravel, either pea gravel or crushed limestone...around the water trough, in gateways, run-in, preferred pathways, etc. The thrush will be better managed, the self trimming will be better managed and the development fantastic. When a hoof does its homework on rocks, it becomes rock crushing which means it crushes rocks instead of the other way around. The shoes would have to come off in order to achieve this, but if you did, then you could hang the shoe up above the barn door and smile at it when you pass. Shoes and imbalance and contracted heels, and elongated breakover = thin soles, which is an abscess waiting to happen. Quarters jamming up, is a hoof that is already jammed up by his descending weight, never mind the ground. It's biotin that takes months to show up in new stronger growth coming down from the coronary band. It's copper and zinc without iron, that strengthens the hoof AT the ground.  You'll see the effects of copper are a lot faster than biotin. Copper strengthens the wall, the water line and the cross connections that give the hoof its flexible strength and that's what you want on those rocks. Between the copper and the gravel, thrush doesn't have a chance.  Copper will also give him his original coat color, never to fade in the sun again. Minerals like California Trace, fed, to make sure they get them. The blocks are mere bonus and will never meet their needs alone. Yes, I do suspect the rocks, but also hooves that can't handle them and yes, they can. I would keep them off the hill until their feet are stronger and abscesses resolved. It doesn't sound like they are missing much out there and if the grass is sparce, then what else is growing? I'd be going for a walk out there. Seed heads are like sugar pills, weeds are higher in sugar, stressed grass is higher in sugar, so are any areas of lush growth.  I'd start with the gravel, though and if the sore foot had to be booted for a bit, so be it, let the other three feet get started in the meantime. It is a journey, and best for you to decide when to take it, but you'll never look back. Oh, and as for road work, if you can, head for the middle, where the crown is free of rocks. Asphalt is magic also. At this point, the gravel shoulder would just be more insult. A hoof has to develop its toughness in degrees and stones are graduation. It's then, that you have a rock crushing hoof.  Hope this helps....

Edited by missyclare

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IME, one typical and usual, easy to fix cause of constant abscessing is often farriers leaving the bars too overgrown and laid over which traps gunk in there. Constant bar and heel abscesses are what you usually see in that situation.  Not saying this is the reason, but all similarities in the horse keeping environment including the hoof care provider could be a potential cause. Pictures are needed to know more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

    Want to thank all of you for the advice, & I'll try to put it to good use, the horse that had abscess, I'm found I'm not to old to learn something new.  Thanks & Best Wishes. PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now