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TigerLilly

IRAP therapy

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I used it for Reina (aged Peruvian mare) a couple years ago!  She had damaged a hind tendon and was very lame and in pain.  I felt the IRAP significantly improved her pain levels and while it helped her tendon to heal, it was never the same and she remained with a limp.  Vet and I feel if we had started IRAP much sooner than we did, we probably could have prevented the final injury-from-stress that permanently damaged her tendon.

*in my avatar photo to the left, you can see her R hind leg twisting from the torque of her trying to avoid loading that leg.

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Oh nice to see there was an improvement. I have to take my mare to the vet soon. She has wants to cross canter when on the right lead so I gave her a few months off and want to get some scans done. I have been reading about all of the possible causes and then started looking for more long term treatments and found the IRAP. I have no idea if my mare would even be a candidate for it since I am not sure what the deal is. I guess I just went down the rabbit hole a little bit lol. It all kind of gave me some anxiety. Sure hope it is nothing serious. 

Edited by TigerLilly

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Sending *thoughts/prayers* for a successful outcome!

 

Reina really did well with the IRAP.  It was a definite difference that we could see.  We were able to do .... I think four .... injections.  

And WAIT A MINUTE!  We used IRAP on her *stifle joint*, not her tendon! 

The tendon was strained because of the pain in her stifle and how she attempted to avoid the stifle pain by moving in an unnatural manner.  That is what caused the strained tendon injury.  IRAP helped reduce her pain considerably.  The first injection, vet drained fluid (to allow room for the IRAP injection) and it was pink-ish, cloudy and thick from particulate matter in the joint that was causing constant inflammation.  At the second injection, the fluid drain was clearer.  The last two injections, the fluid drain was clear and slippery on the vet's fingers - exactly what you want in a well lubricated joint.  The vet could also notice a difference in the stifle joint capsule just by feeling it with her hand and manipulating it at each appointment.  

I'm sorry I mis-remembered.  I hope my earlier thoughts didn't mislead you about the use of IRAP. 

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On 12/26/2016 at 9:49 PM, Heidi n Q said:

Sending *thoughts/prayers* for a successful outcome!

 

Reina really did well with the IRAP.  It was a definite difference that we could see.  We were able to do .... I think four .... injections.  

And WAIT A MINUTE!  We used IRAP on her *stifle joint*, not her tendon! 

The tendon was strained because of the pain in her stifle and how she attempted to avoid the stifle pain by moving in an unnatural manner.  That is what caused the strained tendon injury.  IRAP helped reduce her pain considerably.  The first injection, vet drained fluid (to allow room for the IRAP injection) and it was pink-ish, cloudy and thick from particulate matter in the joint that was causing constant inflammation.  At the second injection, the fluid drain was clearer.  The last two injections, the fluid drain was clear and slippery on the vet's fingers - exactly what you want in a well lubricated joint.  The vet could also notice a difference in the stifle joint capsule just by feeling it with her hand and manipulating it at each appointment.  

I'm sorry I mis-remembered.  I hope my earlier thoughts didn't mislead you about the use of IRAP. 

Not at all. All of the reading I have been doing suggested it could be used for joints or soft tissue. I am probably worrying for nothing. It could be something as simple as poor conditioning by her previous ownerecord and she just needs a more balanced routine. If that is not the case and injections are needed I may just opt for the irap right off the bat. I had read that if horses get a lot of joint injections it can make them less responsive to more long term treatment options. 

Edited by TigerLilly

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Whatever you decide for treatment, I hope it is successful.  I eventually had to put Reina down from that damaged ligament.  She was over 20, but I still considered her a young horse.  It was too soon to lose her.

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I think with you being proactive and trying to help this heal, and not mask the issue, is going to be in her favor for longevity.  You're doing good by her, and that is what counts most.

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On 12/29/2016 at 1:14 PM, Heidi n Q said:

I think with you being proactive and trying to help this heal, and not mask the issue, is going to be in her favor for longevity.  You're doing good by her, and that is what counts most.

I had the vet take a look at her. He says she needs shoes on front. She had a crack on a front foot when I got her. Took her shoes of in September and then my farrier cancelled 3 times and her toes got too long and that crack went right up her hoof:( so she is sore on that front and needs shoes until it is grown out completely. Luckily she grows fast. He hocks are fine and so are her stifles. He says it is a training issue. He suggested cavelletti work. Once I get her shoes on I can ride her and in about a month I can start lightly patterning her. He said she has not chronic unsoundness, just very left handed. Last owner let her get away with it and she will need a good balanced workout regime to get it better at using her hind end. 

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6 hours ago, TigerLilly said:

I had the vet take a look at her.

 

He says it is a training issue. He suggested cavelletti work. Once I get her shoes on I can ride her and in about a month I can start lightly patterning her. He said she has not chronic unsoundness, just very left handed. Last owner let her get away with it and she will need a good balanced workout regime to get it better at using her hind end. 

cavelletis will help with her using her back and tracking up, but for mitigating that one sidedness i'd build up to a lot of riding counter canter, quarter line, counter shoulder in, shoulder in, leg yield in both directions.  it snaps them out of "assuming" too much. 

 

best of luck!!

 

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6 hours ago, nick said:

cavelletis will help with her using her back and tracking up, but for mitigating that one sidedness i'd build up to a lot of riding counter canter, quarter line, counter shoulder in, shoulder in, leg yield in both directions.  it snaps them out of "assuming" too much. 

 

best of luck!!

 

I had just started doing some shoulder in, haunches in and then winter happened. She was picking it up quickly so I was happy with that:) she is really good at pivoting on her back end but sort of clueless about moving her haunches. I thought that might be where the issue was but was not sure. I have only had her since August so we are still feeling each other out. 

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counter canter can work wonders with balance and activating the haunches.  I used to hate having to ride it, but it is so effective for healthy moving that I have come to accept it as the solution for a lot if issues.  

 

the mare sounds nice. 

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from what I've read in your posts so far you like to run barrels.  i'd avoid that pattern for a while until she loses the one sided tendency.   or train the pattern in both directions--better yet make the distance between barrels even larger and ride them in counter canter with a flying change just for fun :P.

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5 hours ago, nick said:

from what I've read in your posts so far you like to run barrels.  i'd avoid that pattern for a while until she loses the one sided tendency.   or train the pattern in both directions--better yet make the distance between barrels even larger and ride them in counter canter with a flying change just for fun :P.

Yes, we are avoiding the pattern altogether right now. She is just to hard on her right rein so I want to get her nice a flexible. 

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counter canter on the outside rein, inside leg.  she'll get softer because she'll have to so she doesn't fall on her face.  that's the lesson.

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