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Oak's Mama

Anyone familiar with Hinnies?

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Here is the long awaited picture of Lil Dusty Buttons. I didn't make much progress today. I was dealing w/ a killer migraine and had the vet out to remove Oak's stitches. But I was able to catch a snapshot. 

Dusty.jpg

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I'm sorry, and please don't tell him, he kinda looks odd to me.  I've never seen a hinney before and I expected him to look more mule-like.  But his head is more horse, his ears seem in-between and his tail is like a horse's.  He was totally not was I was expecting, but he looks like he would still be lovable when he comes around to you.

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He does look more 'horse like' in my opinion as well. I have seen mini mules who look like mules. He looks like a little horse to me. Only w/ slightly bigger ears. 

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Haha, he is strange looking. So he's a mini hinnie? How tall is he? He's lucky to have landed with you.

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Hahahaha! Yes Jubal, he is a 'mini hinny'. 
And YES noponies we food him well. He has come a very long way in the short time we have had him. 
I can't wait to get hands on with him so I can give him a BATH! 

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Dawwwwww! He is adorable!

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Dusty will allow me to get a quick touch on his muzzle without the benefit of a treat in my hand. He will also allow me to be right up on him if the fence is between us. HOWEVER the first move I make to extend my hand forward through the fence he is GONE. Before he wouldn't even approach the fence line if I was there. He will also walk alongside me to his feed bucket when it is feed time. Granted he is about 3 feet away, but that is close for him. I have a feeling that not only was he abandon but he may have also suffered some abuse. Gaining his trust is going to take some serious time and a LOT of devotion. 

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Baby steps, Oak. You just have to have a lot of patience with any equine. You're doing fine.

 

 

 

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I think you're getting there, and you're doing it faster than I thought it could happen with him, based on the situation you said he came from.

I really feel that once he fully accepts and trusts you, he's going to be such a pocket-hinney you'll have to rename him Velcro!

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I have been sick for the last few days and have just not had the time to be out with him the way I would like to. Only to feed. :( He will not associate with my husband or the ranch hands. So I feel a bit like I am abandoning him. I am just sick and dizzy. However I am making it a point to be the one to feed him. 

 

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I thought I posted to this Topic but I guess it went "poof".  If he trusts the mare use her to let him learn to trust you.  Keep it easy, keep it simple.

Eventually tie him to the mare. She will teach him manners.  Use your assets!

 

 

 

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Nick, I read your post about tying to the mare.  I think it was on her hinney topic in the Long Ears section.

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49 minutes ago, jubal said:

I think tying any two animals together is a recipe for disaster!

absolutely!

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You don't let them walk around independently. Quick release knot on the mare and you lead her while she leads the little one.

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Yes he follows Whisp wherever she goes. I don't feel there would be a need to tie him to her. If she is ANYWHERE he is always w/in 10 feet of her. If I approach her he actually draws a little bit closer. I think he is beginning to get more curious about the relationship/bond that she and I have. Whisp is a nuzzler and a talker. She is a gentle mare when it comes to her interactions with me (but she is a BOSS when it comes to running the pasture). She is not one for ear pinning, aggressive head tossing, ground pawing, or any of that foolishness when she is with me. She loves me and I her. She greets me with whinnies and nudges. She follows me where I go and will do it w/o a lead. Dusty is learning from her (I HOPE) that I am one to be trusted, that I mean him no harm and only good things come from my hands. I think even Oak is beginning to take some lessons from being in the pasture with Whisp. His 'dominance' over his food/hay is easing up (this may also be due to me running his big behind whenever he gets ornery with me until he asks me to come back to his hay). I still cannot stall Dusty to feed him. I have tried to get him to follow Whisp to a stall and get him to go into the adjacent one Yea, it hasn't worked. So, the horses go out to feed, Dusty stays and is fed in the pasture. But he seems to be ok w/ the separation for that brief time (I guess his desire to eat is more pressing). The task at hand continues to move forward with some small progress here and there. 

 

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2 hours ago, jubal said:

He already follows the mare. What's the benefit?

it's an asset and a natural tool you can use.  the mare has trust and respect  for OAKS MAMA ergo she's the best teacher for many things, but the first element is trust.    she obviously speaks his language.  let her do the work--it's called "passing it on". 

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Sorry, but I think she's doing just fine already. And I would not like to be holding that mare on a shank when the mule decided to take off for parts unknown. Did you learn this technique from an actual horse trainer? Can you point me to his/her published methodology?

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Who said anything about a shank?   A quick release knot on a lead rope on the mare's halter in an emergency.  But otherwise she should teach him to lead.  How else do you propose he learns to stand for the trimmer and the vet (and hopefully the dentist).   If he won't lead he won't stand either.  Let the mare teach him.  It's common sense. I've had several well behaved horses who have corrected bad behaving actors.  

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Well educated horses.  The hinnie is lacking education.  The mare can teach him what she knows.  Use all your assets and make it simple.

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Do you have any corroboration on this? I've never seen or heard of it and I think it's a very bad idea. Most foals are taught to lead with a person leading them following behind the mare with someone else leading her. Now I might agree to that idea for teaching him but she would need someone else to lead the mare. And she still has to gentle him enough to snap on a lead rope without him bolting.

Edited by jubal

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I have actually seen a couple really bad wrecks while attempting this. Hard to get a handle on that "quick release knot" when horses are spinning and kicking.

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1 hour ago, jubal said:

Do you have any corroboration on this? I've never seen or heard of it and I think it's a very bad idea. Most foals are taught to lead with a person leading them following behind the mare with someone else leading her. Now I might agree to that idea for teaching him but she would need someone else to lead the mare. And she still has to gentle him enough to snap on a lead rope without him bolting.

We're not talking about a FOAL.  This is a donkey who was living in a feral state and who apparently only trusts this mare, ergo you use what assets you have.  

I don't understand how any of you can expect him to understand your rules of gentleness.   Try to understand his rules instead, and they're anything but gentle. 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, noponies said:

I have actually seen a couple really bad wrecks while attempting this. Hard to get a handle on that "quick release knot" when horses are spinning and kicking.

Only if you were unsavvy enough for something like that to happen in the first place, and your timing was so crappy that you couldn't ameliorate it.  

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We have a polo barn as a neighbor.  The grooms pony as many as 12 horses at a time, tied to one another around a race track without incident.  What do you guys do with your horses?

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I think people should only do what they feel they have the skills to do and/or what they are comfortable doing.  I can lead a horse with each hand but if any of the horses are known to be fractious, or even look animated, I will make two trips to lead them one at a time.  I would not feel comfortable tying a basically unbroke hinney to my horse to teach it to lead.  

I would treat this hinney as I do the feral cats/kittens I socialize and tame.  The animal would go into a space large enough to feel safe but small enough that it could not escape contact with me if I wished it.  I would, through deliberate actions and careful body language appear as unthreatening as possible while creating opportunities for the animal to associate me with good things - food/treats.  After a short adjustment period, I would begin making contact to show that my touch will not kill it and in fact, my touch can feel good.  Of course, this is much easier with kittens and small cats compared to a hoofed animal that can kick and bite and cause serious damage out of fear.

Oak's Mom has to work with what she has, which is currently a working ranch with open spaces.  Personally, I feel she has made great progress with Dusty and I can see this trend continuing forward.  

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