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Oak's Mama

Anyone familiar with Hinnies?

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Okay, I did a little digging. It seems this is an old method used by cowboys who had to train a bunch of range youngsters. But they would tie the yearling to a trained donkey. And I'm sure you've seen how they broke horses to ride. Then I saw a thread about it on COTH. Look at post #20. That happened. Think what could happen with an untrained donkey tied to a mare. Nick, I don't think you should be giving advice like this to people with no training experience. You could cause someone to get hurt. And did you train that yearling you bought this way?

https://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/forum/discussion-forums/driving/10185-tie-a-donkey-to-my-horse

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Just for the sake of stopping a debate as to not have any reason for it to have to continue; let me say that I have NO intentions of tying Dusty to my mare. First off I cannot even get a rope close enough to him to do it if I wanted to try. As a matter of fact the halter he has on he has had on for 'only God know how long' and I cannot even get my hands on it! I can move him from pasture to pasture and barn to stables by allowing to follow Whisp. While I am comfortable leading 2 horses at the time (one in each hand) I have a LOT of apprehension leading a string of them tied together. I don't reckon I have that skill set. or the 'nerve' for such a task. 2 would be my limit. And 'Dusty' on a lead lied to my FAVORITE girl? Yea, not comfortable with that at all. I have seen it done in old westerns with trained donkeys and mules, this one isn't and neither am I in this particular area. I will continue to work with what I have the way I have until I either succeed or find the 'Donkey Whisperer'. :D

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I'm glad you are smart enough to know and understand your limitations and to weed bad advice from good. People live longer that way. B)

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While tying a mule to an experienced mare w/ a quick release knot maybe a good idea for someone who has THIS particular training working with mules, donkeys, and horses; I do NOT have ANY experience with donkeys or mules much less working them in unison with horses. I will stick with what I know. IF I encounter someone with this skill set I may allow THEM to do it with THEIR horse but I will want references and PROOF that they know what they are doing for the sake of this poor little hinny. 
I know when I am out of my range of knowledge and I am usually pretty good at asking for advice and/or help. Like w/ Oak. I had ZERO idea what to do with a horse with that kind of temperament. I ended up hiring a trainer after seeking advice here. Seeing as though Dusty is not going to be more than a companion animal and a cow protector I don't really see the need for a trainer at this point IF I can continue to make progress (regardless of how slow). I just want him to come to the understanding that not ALL humans are cruel and not all humans will abandon him. 

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In a contest of wills between a horse and a donkey, I think the donkey would win, smaller or not. That's probably why that particular method used donkeys to tie the horses to. I think it's just a poor substitute for good training skills. As far as teaching a horse to lead, it probably did. But it didn't teach the horse to respect the human.

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It was developed by people who couldn't bother to spend the necessary time with a youngster actually DOING the job.

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17 hours ago, jubal said:

But it didn't teach the horse to respect the human.

See this is what I am trying to avoid and accomplish at the same time. I want to KEEP my horses respect and at the same time EARN the respect of this hinny. I am ot trying to get a double whammy buy NOT gaining Dusty's respect and making Whisp lose the respect I have cultivated with her over the years. 
If I have to continue to take it SLOW that is just the price of building a trust that will last w/o compromising a trust that already exists. 

 

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On ‎3‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 1:16 AM, noponies said:

It was developed by people who couldn't bother to spend the necessary time with a youngster actually DOING the job.

it was developed by people who had trail strings, pack animals, in Alaska, pioneers.  they didn't have the TIME to be "nice".    the best creature to teach another creature is not a human.  humans don't get it. 

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^^^You didn't answer my question. Did you teach your young horse to lead by tying it to another horse/donkey?

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We got our hands on the Hinny! WHOOT WHOOT! I had to bring Whisp up to have the farrier do her hooves (he did hers last). While he was working on her we allowed Dusty to follow her out of the pasture and up to the stables without any lead, just on his own as he is ALWAYS just steps behind her. He went into the stall closest to where the breezeway is where she was being tended to. I took the opportunity to close that stall door and step inside with him and LO AND BEHOLD he allowed me to brush him and feed him an apple! I stayed in with him the whole time Whisp was being worked on and he didn't even really act like he minded much! Yee Haw! I may have to bring him up with her everyday at feed time and get some 'hands on time' with the boy! I am SO thrilled! 

 

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Woooooooooooooooooo Hoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!  What a MAJOR breakthrough you had with him today!  Congrats, you!

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Thanks everyone for the advice and encouragement! I have already brushed him this morning and put fly treatment on him. :jump: I feel much better knowing that now I can tend to all of his needs not just the basic ones! AND the farrier did his feet yesterday. He said they were in GREAT shape all things considered. I am OVER THE MOON right now! 

 

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Great news, Oak. The trust was built and now he will have a forever happy home with everything he'll need.

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3 hours ago, Oak's Mama said:

Thanks everyone for the advice and encouragement! I have already brushed him this morning and put fly treatment on him. :jump: I feel much better knowing that now I can tend to all of his needs not just the basic ones! AND the farrier did his feet yesterday. He said they were in GREAT shape all things considered. I am OVER THE MOON right now! 

 

SO AWESOME!  This is simply fantastic news.  I'm so glad you're able to handle him now.  You definitely deserve some pats on the back!

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Yes Heidi I am THRILLED! I still cannot approach him in the pasture. What is up with that?! But he doesn't seem to mind in the stall! Yippee! I DID have to be the one to hold him and comfort him while our farrier trimmed his hooves which took all of 10 minutes. He was very surprised at how good a shape his little hooves were in! His toes weren't too long, cracked, chipped, and his frogs were good. So he just trimmed everything back a bit, filed them smooth, and conditioned them and we rocked on! Oh HAPPY DAY! 

 

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I have a young former feral kitty that I got last summer who will happily let me pet her as long as I'm putting food down for everyone but if I just randomly reach to pet her, she slinks and scoots away.  With time, that response will go away, just like I think it will for you and Dusty.  Trust takes a while to build, but once you have it .... you've got it, then you just need to reinforce and protect it.

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1 hour ago, Oak's Mama said:

Yes Heidi I am THRILLED! I still cannot approach him in the pasture. What is up with that?! But he doesn't seem to mind in the stall! Yippee! I DID have to be the one to hold him and comfort him while our farrier trimmed his hooves which took all of 10 minutes. He was very surprised at how good a shape his little hooves were in! His toes weren't too long, cracked, chipped, and his frogs were good. So he just trimmed everything back a bit, filed them smooth, and conditioned them and we rocked on! Oh HAPPY DAY! 

 

I'd say, in the stall, he knows he's already caught. But out in the pasture, he doesn't want to be caught. I would try approaching the mare and giving her a treat, ignoring him. Maybe he will start asking for a treat. Just a guess.

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just a question, why do you think he doesn't come to you in the field?  we have a 25 year old warmblood, a 12  and a 4 year old Lusitano.  ALL of them approach us and say "pick me!!" (in horse talk).     has nothing to do with food in our case, not saying that it doesn't work we just don't believe in it and don't use it.   interesting work is the best motivation IMO. 

 

we also don't "catch our horses". they catch us. 

 

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On ‎3‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 9:13 PM, jubal said:

^^^You didn't answer my question. Did you teach your young horse to lead by tying it to another horse/donkey?

we used our 25 year old warmblood and my 12 year old gelding to teach the young lad manners.  and yes, he was tied to the older horse with a quick release knot, with my horse correcting from behind.  nothing like a horse to teach a horse.  most  people just don't get it with corrections and how harsh, quick and fair they have to be.  horses get it, it's they how they are with each other--perfect timing, knowing what's going to happen before what happens happens.  as a person you have to be incredibly accomplished to do all of that as well as a horse or a donkey. 

Edited by nick

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On ‎3‎/‎29‎/‎2017 at 7:09 PM, Oak's Mama said:

Yes Heidi I am THRILLED! I still cannot approach him in the pasture. What is up with that?! But he doesn't seem to mind in the stall! Yippee! I DID have to be the one to hold him and comfort him.

 

glad he did well for the trimmer but comfort him?  i don't think that's a concept familiar to donkeys. 

Edited by nick

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57 minutes ago, nick said:

we used our 25 year old warmblood and my 12 year old gelding to teach the young lad manners.  and yes, he was tied to the older horse with a quick release knot, with my horse correcting from behind.  nothing like a horse to teach a horse.  most  people just don't get it with corrections and how harsh, quick and fair they have to be.  horses get it, it's they how they are with each other--perfect timing, knowing what's going to happen before what happens happens.  as a person you have to be incredibly accomplished to do all of that as well as a horse or a donkey. 

Well, I guess I'm incredibly accomplished then. I've never had to tie a colt to a horse or donkey to teach it to lead.

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I guess so.  I've always thought the best horse to teach another horse is a horse.  Good on ya!

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35 minutes ago, jubal said:

Well, I guess I'm incredibly accomplished then. I've never had to tie a colt to a horse or donkey to teach it to lead.

You're a retired schoolteacher right?  You never had to get a bunch of trail horses following one another, no matter what kind of an eejit is sitting up there.   That's what donkeys do, lead by example. 

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