Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, little cow said:

S'up, Red?   :huggy:  We almost got blown away with Hurricane Irma, but we held on tight.  Hope things are going well up there where you freeze your nubbies off (I'm not sure what nubbies are, but they sound important).

Heck, I moved to the North East armpit of Texas 5 years ago... no frozen nubbies here! (Wilson says hi.) Got a grown up job, paying my own way, blah blah blah... oh, and I have my own donkey now! Named her Karma, so I can tell people not to let her bite them in the arse, lol! 

I think it was last year some time, someone posted your video of you & Don, with the violin and were saying not nice things. Typical of well, me, I chewed some rear end for ya. I LOVED that video, and NOBODY talks bad about MY buddies! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Gosh I never knew there were so many uses for WD-40,  reading this thread has been a real learning experience!!

Red, Didn't know, it had been 5 years, since you moved south, don't when I will be down that way again, my wife has been dealing with some health problems,  so traveling any distance  isn't in the cards at this time. But we arn't dead yet, so I expect we have a couple more trips to Texas, in us.  I'm glad that life has smiled on you more since you have been in Texas.  PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for defending my a---, Red! 

On a sad note, we lost Donkeyotee a few years ago.  When he was castrated at seven months old, the vet fixed a hernia, but that hernia also resulted in tears inside.  At eleven years old, his luck ran out and emergency surgery revealed a dead section of intestine where it fell through those tears.  Just a normal roll caused it all.  It was really hard on us because he had so much personality.  The vet hospital did a great job and he was put down on the table.  The necropsy result confirmed that we made the right choice.  

Well, we still get a check now and then and it all goes towards helping donkeys.  So far, we've helped three.  We only kept one.  Her name is Rosie.  We got her at six months old and she was in a rough spot.  But, she has learned how to pick up her feet, be good for grooming, standing tied, etc...and even tolerates the vet.  She goes for walks with us as well.  When she is old enough, she will be our pack donkey on camping trips.  

 

Meet Rosie!  That's Libby in the background.  And Maggie's tail on the right.

IMG_7026.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Libby has an interesting story.  I have always loved Morgans, but they can be pricey.  Poor Libby needed a home and was in bad shape.  $250 on CL.  She was loved by her previous owner, but was leased out to bad folks who moved and sold her (with papers).   I contacted the owner on the papers and they were retired and very happy that she was safe with me.  They signed her over to me.  Her sire was a grand champion several times (6, I think).  Double M breeding, if that means anything to you.  She goes into saddleseat mode in the arena, until I drop all rein contact and rub her neck until she slows down and relaxes.   Great trail horse and cowpony.   Her right eye is fully blind.  She damaged it sometime after she was stolen and it healed without fluid buildup, so no pain.  Of course they never called  a vet.  She listens to verbal commands to pick up her feet for any obstacles on the trail.  

 

 

IMG_7017.JPG

IMG_7028.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, little cow,  Double M doesn't mean anything to me. I was always a Saddlebred person. But my last horse that was bought in partnership so that my friends and I would each have a horse to trail ride, ended up with me. He was Morgan/Arab cross. After he died, I decided to get a Morgan because he had been so easy going and teachable.  Mine has the Saddlebred influence on his papers, but like yours, looks more "old blood" Morgan. And from his personality, I think he has some mule in there somewhere. But he looks a great deal like your mare. I'll try to get a photo this week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice. Maybe they both have UVM lines?  Mine does.  I think that's where some of that old blood comes from.  :smile:

Anyway, she's my first Morgan and I'm very pleased with the intelligence.  I've had stock type horses before her.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice Looking aged mare.     Got jump in here, & ask if either of your Morgans are gaited?  I know some Morgans are, & that Morgans were used  in the creation of the Missouri Fox Trotter.   I have a special affection, for aged horses,  I have a 25 year old mare, that is no longer sound,but was a honest horse I could put young grandchildren on.  PD

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, PD, Jubal isn't gaited either. But his trot is exceptionally smooth. I can sit it bareback easily. There is Morgan  influence in most of the Amercan breeds--saddlebred, standardbred, quarter horse, etc.

Equus magazine did a great series last year about Morgans with photos of a lot of the foundation stock.  I learned a lot from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

   Want to thankyou both for your prompt replies,  I didn't know some Morgans were gaited until I saw them listed as one of the gaited breeds.    I remember watching the Disney movie, Justin Morgan got a Horse, years ago, I've heard the Morgans called the true stock horse.  There are things in history, that I find extremely interesting, especially horse history.  Best Wishes.  PD

Edited by Proud Dad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That reminds me.  Does anyone trail ride with a mix of gaited and non-gaited horses?  I was wondering which breeds go well together.  My husband is leaning towards a stock type as his next horse, but we want to try several breeds, including gaited to see if he likes them better.  

I have heard it's hard to ride with TWHs unless you have one, too.  Is that true?  Is that true of other gaited breeds?

Also, does anyone know about the Paso Fino?  They seem spirited and on the small side.  Smaller is fine as we are not big people.  I've heard the Peruvian Paso is more mellow.   Are they easier to ride with a stock type horse?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  Can't give you a complete answer to your question, but  several years back & I rode fairly often with gaited folks, but I also had stock horse mare that walked fast, & had no problem keeping up with gaited horses.  I do think it depends it works better some than others,  but if a horses is well trained, & rider has a good handle on horse,  both should be able to slow horses down a bit, or speed up a bit to make for a good ride.  I ride both a TWH & a AQHA,  My TWH will slow down & walk, with nongaited horses, but prefers to step out he would do better if I rode with others more often. but these days most of my riding is alone. PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today was the first day I rode Leo and *I LOVE HIM* so much!  He walks quietly, moves smoothly into gait and will halt and stand calmly when I ask at random places.  

IME, the Paso Fino breeders WANT that fino horse - the super fast/fine step and that is what they train for.  I feel that most of the trainers who show, train for fino first and only if the horse flunks out of fino, will they consider training for other pursuits.  I feel this does the horse a grave disservice and sets them up for failure in most non-show homes.  I was into the breed for several years, owned several, and (IMO) unless you find a breeder/trainer who likes the trail mounts and allows their horses to move out at a relaxed corto and largo, you are not going to get the riding mount you wanted.  

I've fallen in love with all 3 Peruvians I've owned.  They are also on the smaller side, height-wise, but they are a stoutly built horse.  Beware of horses with ESPA/DSLD.  It is prevalent in the breed, and unlike the QH and other breeds that are upfront about their breeds' issues, I do not get that same impression with the Peruvians.  I do not think there is a genetic or blood test that can determine ESPA/DSLD, it has to be done with an ultrasound and a vet experienced in diagnosing the disease.  Other methods are asking to see the parents of the horse you are interested in, and especially seeing if the teen-aged horses are not showing signs of the disease.

I have two Rocky Mountain Horses and they are wonderful.  They can walk quietly with non-gaited breeds and move out in gait when you wish for a faster pace.  Be aware of the 'silver' gene - the one that turns black horses into the coveted 'chocolate' coloring - this gene is associated with eye and vision issues.  Horses w/out the silver gene are unaffected.  If you decide to get a red, palomino or cremello Rocky, I would still recommend testing for the presence of the silver gene to rule out future eye issues.  
HOWEVER, the presence of the silver gene, even in double doses, doesn't mean the horse is guaranteed any eye/vision issues, it just makes the percentages of possibility increase.  Typically, many silver Rockies with eye issues have mild symptoms that are not painful, never progress further and remain perfectly good riding horses.  (my mare has two copies of silver, she is a silver bay but looks palomino at first glance)

This is the family I bought my last Rocky from: http://www.southfortyrocks.com/

Edited by Heidi n Q

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rode Leo on Sunday afternoon!

He was AWESOME and I LOVE HIM!  


He looks asleep, but after I asked him to step out, he really woke up! We are new to each other and he startled-in-place a few times but we kept on riding and worked our kinks out. 
He was FABULOUS! Moved right out at a calm walk. Stopped and stood still at random spots when I asked. Responded to leg to move over and around obstacles and we gaited a bit and he is smooth! 
I put Dixie's bridle on him and he didn't care for her bit. I have a headstall ordered for the bit that came with him but it won't be here for a few days. He did fantastic in this modified nose band. It has a PasoFino "curb" - basically a chinstrap with two rings for reins to attach.

Coming back from our ride we came through the front yard and he stopped to look at my skeleton animals. He is very thoughtful and thinks things out. I think he is amazing and can't wait to get him in shape for Harbins Park riding on the trails!

Image may contain: tree, sky, grass, outdoor and nature

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG Heidi!!!!  Sounds like you have found the perfect match to take you on trails.

So will hubby ride the third horse or are you lucky like QB.  Have a horse loving neighbor kid that wants to ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heidi, Nice picture of you & Leo,  glad that he is working out well for you, you look good on him  May I ask how tall Leo is? he looks like he is over 14 hands tall, I've ridden a couple Pasos for brief periods of time, but thought since I'm over 200lbs I needed a stouter horse than either the Peruvian or Pasos.  But I know  the Rockies, Pasos, & Peruvians, are tough horses for their size.  Best Wishes. PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we sleep in a king bed.  The average person would probably love the thought of all the room.

Well think again.

Yup having a Shortman & George makes one wish  for a California king.

IMG_20171023_000002.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RRW,   A Neat picture, your bed must be comfy,  but it has been my experience, that a bigger bed, just has room for more critters, & soon the bed out grows the bedroom.   PD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to measure him, PD.  I think he is over pony (14.2) size but he is certainly smaller than my Rockies.  

I'm hoping hubby will ride w/ me, but if not, BIL will ride and when neither are available .... I've got choices!  I also think it'd be nice to take them all on overnight camping trails so I can ride one each day and no one will get over-worked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, Heidi!  Thank you for all the information.  That was very helpful.  You too, PD.  :smile:

Leo is gorgeous and you look like a great match.  Congratulations!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Heidi n Q said:

I rode Leo on Sunday afternoon!

He was AWESOME and I LOVE HIM!  


He looks asleep, but after I asked him to step out, he really woke up! We are new to each other and he startled-in-place a few times but we kept on riding and worked our kinks out. 
He was FABULOUS! Moved right out at a calm walk. Stopped and stood still at random spots when I asked. Responded to leg to move over and around obstacles and we gaited a bit and he is smooth! 
I put Dixie's bridle on him and he didn't care for her bit. I have a headstall ordered for the bit that came with him but it won't be here for a few days. He did fantastic in this modified nose band. It has a PasoFino "curb" - basically a chinstrap with two rings for reins to attach.

Coming back from our ride we came through the front yard and he stopped to look at my skeleton animals. He is very thoughtful and thinks things out. I think he is amazing and can't wait to get him in shape for Harbins Park riding on the trails!

 

Poor Leo! Can you imagine what he thought when he saw that horse skeleton! He looks like a sensible horse and he must be, to be taking everything in stride after his cross country haul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Heidi n Q said:

I rode Leo on Sunday afternoon!

He was AWESOME and I LOVE HIM!  


He looks asleep, but after I asked him to step out, he really woke up! We are new to each other and he startled-in-place a few times but we kept on riding and worked our kinks out. 
He was FABULOUS! Moved right out at a calm walk. Stopped and stood still at random spots when I asked. Responded to leg to move over and around obstacles and we gaited a bit and he is smooth! 
I put Dixie's bridle on him and he didn't care for her bit. I have a headstall ordered for the bit that came with him but it won't be here for a few days. He did fantastic in this modified nose band. It has a PasoFino "curb" - basically a chinstrap with two rings for reins to attach.

Coming back from our ride we came through the front yard and he stopped to look at my skeleton animals. He is very thoughtful and thinks things out. I think he is amazing and can't wait to get him in shape for Harbins Park riding on the trails!

Image may contain: tree, sky, grass, outdoor and nature

 Your smile says it all.  You two look good together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now