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4 hours ago, spanish_walkin_wannabe said:

 

The photos are great. Thanks. He looks more quarter than saddlebred, except for maybe the slope of his hips. He looks like a nice horse.

I bred my saddlebred mare to a quarter horse when I was a teenager. But she lost the foal in the fourth month. I always wondered what it would have looked like

 

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Spanish great to hear from you.  Must be nice having the boss gone, can actually get something done.  I love your boy.  He reminds me of a big puppy dog.

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Jubal, thanks. Yeah he's a backyard half and halfer from some dinky town breeder. ugly as sin but tries his heart out and works day in and day out for you. Nice horse. 

RRW-- Did you enjoy soaking up all the Florida sunshine over Christmas? I'm jealous. It's been nice here and now Icebox days is this weekend...though I don't feel like participating. staying inside and staying away from people. 

Have a great Saturday. 

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Spanish did soak up the sun & still have color to show for it.  Loved being in the Keys, didn't wan to leave & want to go back.  You'd love a vaca there.

Good booze & great food.  Had a jalapeño watermelon margarita that are yummy.  Yes odd combo but tasty.

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New Moos!

We are getting two new Dexters by the end of the week.  One is ten months old and will be our new herd sire.  The other, a weanling heifer, will join our little herd.  Both are dun colored.  Most Dexters are black, but several of our cows carry dun, so we hope to see more in the future.  The bull was selected for other traits, but dun color is the icing on the cake.  It's harder on black cows down here in the South.  Duns do better in the heat and the flies don't bother them as much.  So, it's for practical reasons that we seek out lighter colored animals.  When they come off the trailer, we will have them in a temporary pasture, then run them through the chute and put halters on them.  Training begins the following week.  

We had to cut down our herd two years ago in anticipation of moving our farm.  Then, last spring, a lady who owned one of the first Dexters cows I ever had (she's twelve now) said she didn't want her anymore.  I guess we're just big softies because we brought Tara home.  Tara is a dun, actually, so I hope she is able to have a calf with our new bull.  Either way, she is home.  We also have our son's cow, FIona, and a mother-daughter combo.  The mother is our boss cow, April, and her daughter is not actually ours.  She belongs to our church and all her calves go to the freezer to feed those in need.   The last cow, Buttercup,  is not going to stay with us much longer.  We will send her to the freezer after she weans the calf she is carrying.  She is too spooky and teaches her babies to be afraid.  We will have to wean her calf at five months to get extra time with the calf before vaccines.  Hopefully, the calf will unlearn it's fear of humans.  The church cow and Buttercup are due to calve very soon.  

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Yea for moo cows!  

My friend in CA who breeds foundation QH has two Hereford cows and a Dexter bull for freezer calves every year.  She wanted the Dexter bull so the calves would be smaller and easy for the cows to birth.  Eli, the bull, is friendly and we can walk up and scratch him in the pasture.

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LC,   I have ask, just how big does the average Dexter cow get? And what is average weaning weight of the calves?  I could google it & probably find out, but I know that what google says & what the average producer raises can be different.  Also are most of them polled these days??   Best Wishes.  PD

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Actually, those are great questions, PD.  Dexters are naturally small because they are originally from a mountainous region in Ireland.  They are naturally horned.  The polled gene doesn't exist in Dexters.  However, "improved" polled bulls from the UK were imported years ago.  They are not pure Dexters, but those who wanted the polled gene used their genetics to create polled herds.  There is also a little variation in height of Dexters.  Some Dexters are short legged because they carry a dwarf gene (chondrodysplasia).  One copy of the gene makes shorter legs; two copies is lethal (bulldog calf born dead).  The red color also came from the ""Improved" bulls.  There is a natural red coat color in traditional Dexters, but it's fairly rare.  The polled, red, herds are all modern lines using Dexter bulls that are not pure Dexter.  The dwarf gene comes with arthritis at a young age, which is bad for a breed that can live into their 20s.  

We avoid polled animals, modern reds, and those that carry the dwarf gene.  It's quite easy to do when you stick with traditional lines that go back to the first Dexters imported from Ireland.  So, our cows are typically horned (or dehorned), black (with a few duns), long legged, and sweet.  The advantage of traditional lines is a steady, easy going, temperament.  They can get spunky (ours run and buck on cold days).  Some of the modern lines have great temperaments, too, but it's more consistent with the old lines. 

We dehorn our cows, but leave the bulls with theirs (to defend their herd, if neccessry).  We might tip the horns when they get older, but a well-mannered bull can keep his horns.  Never turn your back on a bull.  Always watch his body language.  Any bull can turn in an instant.  They are the most dangerous animal on a farm.  That being said, our last bull used to listen to me very well.  When he was young and challenged me, he got a swat on the top of his nose and that was enough to get him to listen.  He was always very gentle.  Like our cows, I could halter him in the pasture.

Weanlings are about 300-400 pounds.  Dexter steers are about 550-600 pounds at 24 months and ours yield about 60% beef from that weight, which is quite good.  Our Dexter cows are about 700-800 lbs and stand about 42-44 inches (unless they are fat, like one of ours, lol!).  They are usually officially measured at about age 2 years, but they can grow taller after that.  Our last bull, who we still sell quite a few straws from, was about 1,100 lbs and 42 inches at age four.   We sold him to a lady in texas where he lives on a much bigger farm now.  

Here is a link to my blog, in case you want see some Dexter pictures.  

http://moonlitoaksranch.blogspot.com/

Edited by little cow

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I should mention the cow that teaches her calves to be spooky is one I bought from another breeder because of her great traditional lines.  She's had a hard life, though.  She came around quite a bit, but she still hides her calves and teaches them to be afraid, so she isn't good as a brood cow.  

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LC,   Thanks for all the info about Dexter cattle, that was very interesting. I did google dexter cattle, but it wasn't as informative, as your's,  I can tell you have a real passion for all your critters, Thanks for link to your blog.   PD

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The hauler has to wait for two horses flying into JFK and their two day quarantine, so our new cows will be home early next week.

Anyone watch Animal Airport on Netflix?  It's pretty amusing.  Hearing about the delay for the horses made me think of it.  

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Wonder where the horses are coming from, with only a 2 day quarantine. Didn't they used to do 30 days, or 10 in some cases?

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LC haven't heard of that show. Will have to look it up.

Today started out good then ran away fast to not so good.  Hate days like this.  Alright back to it.

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    Had to come in & warm myself up after plowing snow, my coveralls were soaked through, as temp is still above freezing, so snow is sticky.  Snow is still coming down, so it looks like I'll be doing same thing tomorrow, but it would be hard to move if I waited & did it all at once.  Later.  PD

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PD it has been snowing since noon here.  At one point it was a white out. The parking lot was plowed maybe 2hrs ago.  Going to have to share vel the walk later.

IMG_20180122_173745.jpg

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8 hours ago, noponies said:

Wonder where the horses are coming from, with only a 2 day quarantine. Didn't they used to do 30 days, or 10 in some cases?

I don't know.  Must be fancy because they are flying in through JFK.  Little moos are traveling with royalty.  ;)

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You guys up north take it easy shoveling. 

We warned up down here.  Thunderstorms moving through tonight and then, cooler.  A few feeble bugs were stirring.  Bring back the cold!

When we get a sudden cold spell, the little fence lizards and anoles are slow.  My son and I sometimes, catch one and warm them in our hands to get them going again.  Then, we let them go near a shelter to hide under.  We are too far north for iguanas falling out of trees, lol!

Edited by little cow

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LC. I have a snow scoop shovel.  Been using one fr tears & love them.  They do not strain the back & you can move a lot of snow.  Heck they work good for pushing pony poo.

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RRW,  I measured snow this PM  when I went out to feed horses & feed my furnace, it was just under 10 inches at that point,  &  still coming down, but it is now snow flurries, will finish cleaning snow tomorrow, I hope it clears up a bit. so I can see better, & the wind isn't blowing.  PD

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PD snow has stopped few hrs ago here.  Wind is still blowing like a mother. Sure glad I shoveled tonight.  Parking lot will get plowed in the morning.

The worst part of life are the monkey wwrenches.  Currently trying to figure out how to work with the mess of wrenches in the tool box.  It is amazing the different way God tests us.  Been a good 15yrs or so that we have been personally tested.  We will pass with flying colors but it is keeping the faith it will happen

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RRW,  Life would be dull without the trials of life,  most of the time it is the simplest things that get to us the most, the harder things we take in stride.  We got just under a foot of snow yesterday,  how much did you get in Spooner?    PD

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We got about 12 or tad more.  My staffer who lives 15 miles north said they didn't get as much.  So it was a funky band that went through.

Where it was plowed good its already melting off.  If we get the 40 degrees they are claiming it won't last.

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RRW and PD that amount of snow here, would paralyse our area. We are not equipped for large snows!

We had an oil and gas well explosion yesterday. Lost 5 workers. My youngest son works in the oil field. I try not to worry about him, until something like this happens. They work extremely long hours and mistakes happen. Feel so bad for the families.

It has been warmer and more like Oklahoma winter. Trying to get back to the gym and more of an active routine. 

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Well car shopping today was a bust. Narrowed it down to 3. One had a bad title so then there were 2. Got to the first place ( 2 hours away) and the place looked like a chop shop. The car its self was scratched up and not one soul came out to help us so we left. Drove 20 more minutes to find out that my last pick had been sold yesterday. Im back to square one. Bummer.

Edited by QueenBAW

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 On our way to Albuquerque Saturday, a tractor/trailer ran us off the road.

 On the interstate, doing 75 mph, we were passing him, we were in back of another semi, who was also passing.

 Semi in front, passed and, we were half way past, when, to our horror, he started moving to the left, into our lane.

 Leaning on the horn and moving over, to no avail, he continued coming, we slowed, of course and, were forced completely onto the shoulder, partially into the grass median.....trucker kept on going, like he had no idea of what he'd done.... which, he probably didn't, because we weren't in his blind spot, so, he must not have looked.

 I got his license plate number and, the number of the trailer, but, the cab had no identifying name/numbers, it was just, blue..... there was also no company name on the trailer, it was a flatbed.

 I didn't see how I could report, without company names. ...a license plate number, might have been enough, but, the writing on it was too small, I couldn't really see the state... could have been Mississippi, but, I can't be sure....I have cataracts, too, so, my eyesight isn't the best....I'm awaiting surgery.

 

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Danyel we usually don't let that little bit of snow slow us down.  Heck the freak 91 Halloween storm just slowed everything down for a day & half.  People were stranded in hotels.  Then 5 years ago we got a good 4ft snow by JANUARY.  First time I had ever shoveled the roof on the farm.

Last night my hubby got stuck in the driveway because of the drifts.  He got out this morning.  He made a call to a friend that has the plow contract down our road.  Figured it would be easy to have him grade the drive seeing as it wasn't out if his way.  Well needless to say he was working on the grader in the shop. 

 

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Danyel,   Sorry for the loss of those folks in the oil & gas explosions,  it seems that  happens to often these days.  Large amounts of snow don't slow things down long up here, unless there is a multi car pile up from driving to fast on slick roads.

equicrzy,  That must have been a bit scary  getting run off the road,  glad you are both okay,  courtesy of others is to often in short supply these days, especially on the highway.

Hope to push my snow banks out more today, so I have more room to put more snow if we get another storm, I should make a trip to town I'm running out of bread, & will stop & get some more horse feed while I'm at it.   PD

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I'm sorry to hear the men at the rig lost their lives.  My husband works in the power industry and he heard about it.  It always makes us pause.

Went riding yesterday with the brother in law.  We wanted to do a quick ride but the trails were too slick in places from a light rain the day before so we kept it at a quick walk.
I put this app on my phone (ViewRanger) and it tracks our route, distance, time and speed.  May not show in this pic, but average speed was 2.88mph.

No automatic alt text available.

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Equicrzy, that was scary. Glad he didn't hit you. Just saw on the news, that there is a stalled semi on a highway south of me. It is hauling elephants!

Beautiful day, in the 50's. Thinking about cleaning the garden spot. I'm getting another raised garden box. Need to get an idea on arranging it.

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