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Libby is retired.  

We all rode together yesterday.  It was awesome.  The only sad part was that Libby has more advanced sight issues and a mild lameness, hence the decision to retire her.  Hubby did great on Freckles and poor LJ, who loves to ride his pony bareback, came off when Libby spooked the pony because she jumped at the sound of a pastured horse running towards her on her blind side.  LJ proved his mettle when he got up, spit the dirt out of his mouth, dusted himself off, and got back on.  The pony, wonderful little Maggie, stopped and waited for him, even though she had a straight shot towards home.

So, I need a new horse to ride.  This horse needs to be another family horse, though, because I want any one of us to ride any horse.  Yes, he or she will ride differently with me, maybe, but I want the ability to switch horses with the hubby, if I need to.  Or, with LJ.  He is getting to be quite a rider.  He will likely need a new mount next year.  But Maggie is family.  She will stay.  

Libby's health issues are piling up.  Her Cushings seemed under control with the meds, but she is in constant heat now.  Weird.  The vet will be out soon for shots, so I'll try to figure out what's going on with her lameness and Cushings.  

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To bad about libby's failing health, just hard to see a horse that has served us well go down hill. But glad new mounts are working well for also.  Hope you can find that other family horse, so the 3 of you can ride together.   Take Care PD

 

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LC, sorry to hear that you are retiring Libby.  As for the hunt of a new family horse it will happen & as always the right one will find you.  Great that Freckles rode out nice for your hubby.  

Hahah....have a staffer who is looking to sell her paint mare that is supposedly a good trail horse.  Could send you video then you can make a cross country Christmas trip.   Lets see....isn't Jubal in KY?  You can stop there first for a cup of hot chocolate. There are a number of members in IL but they haven't been on for a while.  Oh then you can stop at PD's I am sure he would have the coffee on & be sure to give him fair warning of your arrival so he can go to the bakery for a treat.  Then a stop at me.  Just happen to know of a place you can stay & also go for a ride on a train.  By the time you get here you just might want something a bit stronger than coffee & coco, we can accommodate that.  You will be in Wisconsin after all & we say it is always o-beer-thrity, then again we are also the brandy consuming state of the USB).  Been informed that Old Fashions are not well known in other parts of the country or if you do order one they guess you are from Wisconsin.

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LC,,  It sounds like RRW has a cross country trip to buy a horse all planned out for you.  That would be interesting. Some years back when there were more active members on here, was effort to get a horse hauled by a caravan of members along the way. Don't think it worked, & that would put alot of stress on a horse getting in & out of many different trailers over a long period of miles. PD

 

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RRW, the return trip would be a bigger problem, with a horse and trailer in tow.

Have I been talking in my sleep about cocoa? I have a cup every day. Sometimes, I have to argue with myself about whether it would be okay to have a second cup.

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jubal,  I understand why you argue with yourself over that second cup of cocoa,  you are musty better disciplined than I am, must be why I carry a spare tire with me, everywhere I go.

 

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It does tug our hearts when we have to face the frailties of our older mounts.  I'm sure you'll do your homework and find another mount like Freckles and Maggie.  That horse will surely have hit the jackpot. 
I had a horse "trained" to me in 2012.  Reina came from WA state to Georgia.  It took about a month and a half as she had a long layover in Kansas while waiting to arrange a ride from there.  It seemed to do her good, having a long rest in between the rides.

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I couldn't imagine hauling horses that far.  We know a couple in our area that breed Morgans & apparently they have hauled east 2 or 3x this past year.

As usual I have proven my eyes are bigger than what should be.  Cut pine bows & little sap suckers for the front of the motel.  Course cut more than what is needed.

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Go for a lookie see.  You just never know & who knows what else they have in the pasture.

Since we are moved into the living quarters I've been cooking.  Tonight was an easy beef veg noodle soup.  Course added a bit more & was rather pleased it had good flavor.  Shortman & hubby have been enjoying our nightly meals.  Tomorrow pancakes & sausage patties are on the menu.

Do believe it might be time to start a recipe thread.

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LC good luck horse hunting,  most ofb the time it is easier to find something when you don't look tom hard. Unless you are looking for companionship, then it seems like a never ending search.

RRW,  Glad you are enjoying cooking for the men in your life, & on these cold evenings they are really enjoying the fruits of your labor.

Have a great evening one & All  Best Wishes. PD

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There is another reason to shop locally for a horse.  There is a risk associated with bringing a horse down to Florida from another state.  The word from the local vets is that all Florida horses are exposed to possums (except maybe the ones kept in those insane fancy farms in Ocala and Palm Beach).  The university took random blood samples of average Florida horses and all of them showed exposure to the possum parasite that causes EPM.  Very few horses actually get sick from it.  Only some horses are susceptible to EPM.  If I bring a horse down here from another state, they could have already been exposed, but if they haven't been, they might get sick.  

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Possums are EVERYWHERE. I think most horses in the US, except the hothouse flowers, have been exposed. I know they are here in Iowa, with the nasty critters in the hay barns and all.

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They are useful.  We would have a lot more bugs without them.  

Regardless, some horses don't adjust to Florida well.  Beautiful horse came down from the northeast and the horse looked horrible by summer.  She had to rehome him up north.  

I have a coupld of leads on some local family horses.  I get to go try out horses. This is fun.  

Edited by little cow

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Absolutely.  Different areas of the country have different climates, bugs and other vectors.  Some horses (just like people) simply can't adjust and are miserable until they can get out of that environment.

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I adopted an older horse through this board years ago.  He was from Ozland.  Her vet put 18 as his age on his health certificate (I was looking for a gentle family horse) but he was much older.  Nevertheless, he had a good couple of years of being spoiled and ridden lightly, and a nice retirement after that.  Melanoma caught up with him at age 30+  and he was put down.  There wasn't a train to get him, but he was originally from Michigan and picked up by one lady in Indiana, then to Oz, then to me.  HIs digestive issues and teeth weren't fixed until he came to me.  Not sure where along the way his age was recorded wrong, but it doesn't matter.  It worked out.  

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LC,  I wish you well finding another family horse,  finding the right fit, might be harder, but they are out there.  Take Care.  PD

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LC, I am of the belief that critters like the horse you adopted come our way by means of the big guy upstairs.  He knows it may not be easy to care for them yet the critter needs that one home in its life to show that people do care.  

So are you going to go look at a horse this weekend?  

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So got a little skunked with ordering one Christmas gift.  Bought a mermaid pillow only to have it arrive & be a slip cover.  Now I am usually really good at reading the description & I don't remember seeing slip cover.  Oh well looks like I now have to find a pillow to stuff it.

Other than a few other items for Shortman & something for hubby I am done shopping.  Next Wednesday we are going tree shopping & it is my mission to find a very tall fat tree this year.  Taller the better as the living quarters have a vaulted ceiling so we can go big.  Guess I'm gonna have to buy more lights.

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RRW, we decided to put off buying the new horse a little bit longer.  Freckles had a setback when I took him out alone on the trail.  He needs some ground work before trying a again.  

We are in a similar place; both celebrating Christmas in a new house.  Advent begins Sunday, so the decorations go up this weekend.  I have Advent calendars for all three of us.  Hubby has a wooden one that I fill with dark chocolate Kisses for each day.  LJ has a traditional chocolate one with little windows to open each day.  I have a coloring one.  :)

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Tuesday or Wednesday next week we will shop for a tree.  I usually don't buy this early but we are heading to you state of sunny citrus day after boxing day.  So it will be a one day take down of the tree.

If Shortman had the attention for treats like most kids an advent calendar would be fine.  Last year he wouldn't bother with it & had to play catch up with opening windows.  We've also done the Elf on a shelf. That always turned into a game of hot cold as he wouldn't put much effort in finding Elf. Thank heaven for the creation of plastic eggs.

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Putting off another horse for a bit to work with Mr Freckles sounds like a good idea.  Easier to find d time working with one, two becomes more work.

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Hey all, just checking in and in need of some advice. A little lengthy.

My cowgirl (Zarinna) has been amazing. Shes been right on time with the feed, she's been unblanketing on warmer days for me, and she really worked hard the other night when we sold a mini. We sold the latest foal which is now about 6months old. Hadnt done much with him so while hes friendly and has had a halter on, that's about it. So I had Zarinna use her lariat I bought her as a butt rope while I led. Of course he was way out on the back 50 when his new owners came to get him, so we had to pull/buttrope him quite a ways to the barn, lol. Zarinna was SO helpful and when he put up a fuss loading for the first time, she never waivered and pulled hard on her buttrope. I don't think I could've got him on without her help. I was very proud of her that night, and she was pretty proud of herself. Also a lady we know brought 2 of her 4H cows to the farm to use our paddock, and Zarinna is in loooove with them. I did have to explain to her that at the end of the 4H project they would be going to made into steaks...she had to think that over but agreed that she would try not to get too attached to them. Theyre very sweet cows, so its hard, but its a good lesson for her. She didn't realize where her food comes from. She really would love 4H and doing livestock of some sort...but my hands are kind of tied since I'm not her parent.

Now for the needing advice portion..lol.

I'm struggling with the landlord over these minis. He admittedly is not a horse person. He does not understand the difference between horses and cows. HE currently has 7 minis (one is a stallion) and 3 donkeys. I am the ONLY  person he has that will tend to these minis. Keep in mind that most of them have had little handling. Meaning, if the vet has to come for some reason (god forbid) I am the one that catches them and holds them for the vet...on my own time. Monday the vet came to draw coggins on the minis he wants to sell. It was freezing cold, rainy, and mud up to my ankles. The vet was 2 hours late. I spent my entire morning at the farm in the freezing rain with minis that don't belong to me. The landlord scoffs and blows me off as if its no big deal. When he decides he wants to sell some minis, its up to me to advertise, prep, and sell. When the farrier comes,  its up to me to catch/trap/rope/hold said minis, and the whole ordeal takes most of the day. Getting the farrier to come out is a whole ordeal in itself as well. First of all, the only uses one particular man, which is fine...but hes slow as molasses and he comes when its convenient for him, not scheduled. Secondly, explaining to the landlord that horses need to be on a 6 week (or 8 week) trimming schedule is like talking to a brick wall. For example, the farrier texted me earlier in the week asking what days I'm available for him to come. So, I ask the landlord if the farrier can come, meaning hey ya gotta pay the farrier. The farrier was last out 3 months ago. Every equine on the property is overdue....and I get the "but do they really need it" argument. He then decides that they can wait another month. Great, wonderful, so by then it'll be December and nice and freezing cold, and probably even snowy and I'll be having to deal with the minis. Awesome. While he complains about the farrier bill, he keeps breeding!  I keep reminding myself that I DO have 3 horses on his land for free...so I DO feel obligated to help, but it was never required...But where do I draw the line? Or am I being ungrateful? He was paying for my 3 trims when the farrier comes as payment for dealing with the minis, and he was ok with that but now hes getting pi$sy about that. Do I pay for my 3 and say the heck with the minis? Honestly I don't think he'd care if the minis got trimmed or not. The other thing that chaps my hide is this...we're thinking about selling Margarita (the dun mini). The girls have put a lot of work into her and when she sells, he refuses to give them a dime. I don't think that's right. Ugh, he IS a good person, and he IS good to me...but...I'm struggling with this. Advice?

The other thing I need advice with is this...Zarinna has been a huge help with the horses, theyre definitely her thing and she loves it. She puts in the work. Her sister puts in zero work, and says that horses aren't her thing yet when it comes time to show she expects to be able to show with her sister. I don't think that's fair. Keep in mind that I'm paying for it all as well. I don't mind paying for Zarrina, (even though her parents should be paying AND there at the show to support her) because she puts in the work. But for the sister that does not work, I don't think I should pay. I'm tempted to make a new rule...if you don't put in the work, you don't show, period. But of course I don't want to exclude anyone. Should I just let the sister show anyway and fail?

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Tell sister YOU are paying, so she needs to EARN to show, like Zarinna, or pay for her own showing. Kids don't learn if you don't make em.

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Don't know what to tell you about the landlord.  So no help there.

As for the sister that just wants to show & not work for it.  There is absolutely no problem with not letting her show based on not doing any work with the horse.  If it is a matter of making a chart of some sort then apply  a time line.  Have to work so many hours in a week, register those hours & also what was done.  So she is accountable for what she does & if the minimum isn't met then can't show.  If she just misses the required amount then you can go to the show to watch.

This is a good time for teaching kids about working your hours & getting paid for the time put in.  More time you put in the more you earn.

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I agree she needs to earn the right to show. Just explain Zarinna works for the privilege and she will have to also.

Explain to the landlord that minies with untrimmed feet can go lame or end up with crooked legs. Neither will help his sales. You can also tell him if any of them don't need it when the farrier comes, you won't have them trimmed. Tell him if he doesn't put them on a schedule with your horses,  you won't be available to help with them. And don't forget to tell him how much you appreciate having a place to keep your horses. Good luck.

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1 hour ago, jubal said:

I agree she needs to earn the right to show. Just explain Zarinna works for the privilege and she will have to also.

Explain to the landlord that minies with untrimmed feet can go lame or end up with crooked legs. Neither will help his sales. You can also tell him if any of them don't need it when the farrier comes, you won't have them trimmed. Tell him if he doesn't put them on a schedule with your horses,  you won't be available to help with them. And don't forget to tell him how much you appreciate having a place to keep your horses. Good luck.

Ive explained all of that to him.

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I understand the anxiety of pulling back and caring only for your own while having to watch the others fall into a state of neglect .... but you are going to have to figure out something you can live with. 

You may have to stop explaining or asking and just tell him your horses will be done every 8wks and since you're catching your own, his will be done as well.  Perhaps the compromise will be you keeping your horses on a schedule you prefer while his are on a more elongated (perhaps every 12wk, 4x/yr) schedule.  When he does the do-they-really-need-it argument, hand him that argument right back and baldly tell him that making the minis wait that long between trims is willful and deliberate neglect on his part.  Heck, add in how badly it hurts your heart to see their hooves be so badly neglected.  Poke yourself in the eye and work up some tears, if you think it will sway him! 

Regarding the sale of the minis and the effort put in by the girls while they receive no monetary compensation .... that is a family matter and I'd stay well out of it. If he balks at paying for routine farrier maintenance what makes you think he's gonna get a heart and give some of that money to the kiddos?

As for the kiddos and showing, it should be approached as pay-to-play.  If they don't put in the grunt-work they can't step in at the last minute and enjoy the fruits of someone else's labor.  I like the idea of using the accountability chart.  It sets clear boundaries and requirements.  If she puts in the effort, great!  If not, she gets back exactly what she put in.  She needs to be introduced to the NILIF system - Nothing In Life Is Free.  The chart can be used to visually drive that home since you would have something physical to show her exactly what her effort, or apathy, have earned.  If your heart balks at doing that to the child, tell her you refuse to pay for someone who isn't putting in physical effort during the non-show portion of the year and she will have to come up with the entry money on her own.  If she manages to find/get the money, she shows.  If not, she doesn't.  

Finally, between the lines, I am picking up on your frustrations.  I will reiterate that you will have to come up with a solution you can live with.  To help with your frustrations about handling the minis, remind yourself you are keeping your horses there for free and the cost to you (in lieu of board) is your time catching/handling the minis for their care that he pays for.  And that is still a good deal even if he isn't paying for your horses' trims.  If it is bothering you that he shrugs off your time/effort of handling, catching, prepping and advertising, bill him for your time, especially if you think your time/efforts are exceeding the value you place on your horses being on his property for free.

What it boils down to is this: You need to decide how you are going to think of this arrangement. 
You need to decide whether the costs of your time/energy outweigh the benefits of keeping your horses there or if you need to cut all of your equine ties with him.  Decide to let him do his own thing with his own animals and family or decide if you wish to remain involved, and to what degree that can be for your peace of mind.

I am sorry I haven't appeared to be supportive with this post but sometimes we need things baldly stated to jar us into discovering how we truly feel about a situation.  I hope I've been helpful in that manner and it helps you discover how you truly feel and what you can, and can't, live with.

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Could you do what Heidi suggests and get the ponies trimmed along with yours at 8 weeks? And then have the farrier bill him for  his part? Maybe he wouldn't argue with a man.

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