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GreyDrakkon

Signs of spring?

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Thanks for the advice and well wishes.  Libby was fine after breakfast and I just gave her more bran and a little hay for lunch.  Hoping she is on the mend.  Our vet swears by aloe juice.  She had me add a cup to every mash.  Since timothy and coastal are both grass hays, the vet wasn't concerned about the switch.  It was a bigger jump giving her soaked alfalfa cubes, but that went over well (not too many).  

If she colics again, I will definitely ask about ulcers.  That is an interesting thought.  Wish we had grass right now, but not here on the old farm.  We have it at the new farm, but the paddocks aren't finished.  

Edited by little cow

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Maybe that's why the vet suggested it.  

Heat colic is interesting.  This is her first colic, thank goodness.  If it happena again, I will have to think about other causes.  So far, she's been pain free since Monday night.  Yay!!!

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I should mention the other irony....I hate timothy hay.  I'm allergic to it, so it makes me itch and sniffle.  I have to put leather glove on to feed Libby and Maggie the pony.  Not allergic to anything but timothy hay, lol!

Edited by little cow

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2 hours ago, jubal said:

LC, my last horse was prone to colic. I never found a cause. When he was down in his stall and uncomfortable, I would start walking him. It usually took about a half hour and it was over. It got so he would practically walk himself. He lived to 29. He did well on Purina Senior which is alfalfa based, and alfalfa cubes.  Does she have access to grass? It's usually a pretty good laxative this time of year. I hope she comes out of it okay.

Alfalfa is calcium heavy, as is oat and oat hay, and has been known to cause entroliths, which will mimic a recurring colic.

Edited by noponies

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3 hours ago, noponies said:

Alfalfa is calcium heavy, as is oat and oat hay, and has been known to cause entroliths, which will mimic a recurring colic.

Enteroliths happen most often in the desert states. I don't know if the connection has been found yet, but yes you're right. alfalfa is associated. I've never had a case or known anyone else who has.

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She did well after lunch, so a little more tonight with her bran mash and then we are cutting back to two bran mashes tomorrow and adding more hay.  I'm going to keep up the bran mashes and aloe once per week.  I usually give bran mashes with Sandclear and mineral oil every Sunday night.  Since our horse, pony and donkey consistently have no sand in their sand tests, perhaps it helps.  Sand colic is the biggest killer down here.  In fact, I don't think it is coastal hay that's the issue as much as the sand that is blown into the hay during the baling process.  

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35 minutes ago, jubal said:

Enteroliths happen most often in the desert states. I don't know if the connection has been found yet, but yes you're right. alfalfa is associated. I've never had a case or known anyone else who has.

California and Arizona feed a LOT of alfalfa and oat hay. Iowa feeds a lot of alfalfa too, which is why I know it happens.

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23 minutes ago, little cow said:

She did well after lunch, so a little more tonight with her bran mash and then we are cutting back to two bran mashes tomorrow and adding more hay.  I'm going to keep up the bran mashes and aloe once per week.  I usually give bran mashes with Sandclear and mineral oil every Sunday night.  Since our horse, pony and donkey consistently have no sand in their sand tests, perhaps it helps.  Sand colic is the biggest killer down here.  In fact, I don't think it is coastal hay that's the issue as much as the sand that is blown into the hay during the baling process.  

Shaking that hay out good before feeding helps that a lot.

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The alfalfa in CA and AZ and some other western states is higher in minerals. That's also being studied as possible factors in enteroliths.

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2 hours ago, noponies said:

Shaking that hay out good before feeding helps that a lot.

That doesn't actually work.  Coastal is very soft.  If you shake it, the flake will fall apart.  If you shake a bale, nothing really comes out.  You see it below the feeders after they eat.  

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1 hour ago, little cow said:

That doesn't actually work.  Coastal is very soft.  If you shake it, the flake will fall apart.  If you shake a bale, nothing really comes out.  You see it below the feeders after they eat.  

Falling apart IS the  general idea, so the sand falls out.

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7 hours ago, noponies said:

Falling apart IS the  general idea, so the sand falls out.

People have tried to get the sand out.  It doesn't work.  It's not like beach sand.  It's soil sand that is blown into the bales as they bale it.  It's worse if you buy the shorter cut hay.  I can't explain it.  Believe me, if it was as simple as shaking a bale, we'd all be doing that down here.  

I can't keep using the timothy.  I am so allergic.  Even with gloves and a mask, I am still itchy and have a scratchy throat.  I can't even go to the barn without feeling it.  I'll have to switch them to orchard grass.

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Basically soil particles that stick to the foliage.  I am going to guess this has already been done & won't work.....but would dipping in water help?  Like dipping dusty hay???

On a good note we have SUNSHINE & WARMISH TEMPS:yay:

 

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  It was 50 degrees when I walked outside this AM.  It was kind of nice.

LC,  I wish you luck as you find the right combination that works for your mare. Best Wishes. PD

 

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I just had another request for a project come in "I wet my plants" made into a sign...I giggled. That'll be fun.

I am super excited about my little side work. It's been going well...I'm not charging enough - but I'm having fun. Just learning some more before I start charging regular prices. Right now I'm just asking for cost of material.

Recently I made a bridal shower gift (a decal-ed cookie jar) and signs for a bathroom "soak" "wash" "relax". 

 

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Pink, Great that you are enjoying your new craft,  when you enjoy doing something it is never a job.

RRW, I have 2 thermometers & one is big out door one on our deck, & the other is a indoor one, & sensor can get hit by the sun on both, so accuracy of both is questionable. But seeing 50 above did my heart good. PD

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PD - that's exactly it and why I am undercharging and just asking for them to cover cost of material. I just enjoy doing it!

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::twitches::  As a professional artist/crafter, I beg you to reassess your business model.  It devalues your work and the work of others. Are you taking into account the gas used to go to the store?  

 

Forecast says it's supposed to crawl up to 50 by Friday and pretty much stay there during the next week.  I'll believe it when I see it.  (but I'm going to buy plants anyways!)

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"I wet my plants" sounds like a fantastic gardening sign!  I got into jewelry making as a hobby and the lowest I would charge was for cost of materials x3 so I could replace what I used and buy more.

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GD - I've only ever made things for family/friends. I do not have any advertisements online (or anywhere actually) - saying I sell it. Just friends/family who know I enjoy doing it. I'm not devaluing any other artists out there. I am strictly doing this as a side hobby (I don't consider it a business). (I purchase everything online - so no gas involved. Just my Prime membership that I use for many things.) If I enjoy doing it - I see no harm in just asking for cost to be covered. Just starting this journey I am learning new things daily. Once I'm satisfied in my work more often then not - then I'll start raising the cost.

Heidi - the sign is for my uncle (my Gramma asked me to make it) - they own two garden centers. She wanted to put it on a shirt but felt that it may be inappropriate, lol.

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Noponies, you had some good thoughts, but the vets say that it isn't just the sand that causes issues.  In fact, Libby was negative on her sand test.  Impactions in the ileum are caused by how coastal fibers ball up in the horses' intestines.  So, switching to a different grass hay is the only solution.  Many horsepeople down here will not feed coastal.  I got away with it for years. But no more for our horses.  It is cheaper to feed coastal, but we only have two, so it's not a big hit on our budget. 

Pink, sounds like fun!  Hope you get some customers soon that you can charge full price.  

Thanks for the thoughts about Libby, everyone. I really appreciate it. 

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LC,  Since you know coastal grass is the problem, is any of your pasture grass coastal?  Just wondering green it is not a problem, but when dried & baled it becomes a problem.  PD

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Can't tell you how many wedding bouquets I have done & only charged the materials.  Heck even have had family friends give me supplies & ask me to make a special arrangement.  It is something I really enjoy doing, don't do it a lot & with providing the service/skill I am making a special day for somebody. Course I find it very very painful to watch someone try to make arrangements when they have no idea.  So most of the time I offer to help but end up doing it all.  Only if someone begged really hard & twist arms/legs I'd do embroidery.  Of all the towel I have ever made never made them for myself, always a gift.

By the way I love the "I wet my plants".  I would be a fun one for a shirt.

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17 hours ago, little cow said:

Noponies, you had some good thoughts, but the vets say that it isn't just the sand that causes issues.  In fact, Libby was negative on her sand test.  Impactions in the ileum are caused by how coastal fibers ball up in the horses' intestines.  So, switching to a different grass hay is the only solution.  Many horsepeople down here will not feed coastal.  I got away with it for years. But no more for our horses.  It is cheaper to feed coastal, but we only have two, so it's not a big hit on our budget. 

Pink, sounds like fun!  Hope you get some customers soon that you can charge full price.  

Thanks for the thoughts about Libby, everyone. I really appreciate it. 

One other colic-inducing item you might check into is tapeworm. They don't show up on a regular fecal test. They can cause enough problem that ANY hay can become a blockage.

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Noponies, that's interesting.  I think our vets recommend the powerpack once per year.  If I remember right, that is supposed to get rid of tapeworms.  

Libby and Maggie are enjoyng orchard hay and I'm not allergic to it, lol!

PD, it's only baled coastal that gets them.  And most horses eat it their entire lives and never have an issue.  Our pastures are bahia and bermuda (as well as native grasse).  No issues.  :)

Edited by little cow

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Yesterday it was warm enough that I skipped out early on work and ran to the barn with my friend.  ;)  We ended up spending 90% of the time grooming our filthy filthy mares, who had decided to celebrate the warmer weather and onset of shedding season by being pigs.  There was still snow in the ditches, but the trees seem to think it's time to leaf out.

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