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little cow

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Wow, what a crazy ride this is.  We make a list of our favorite breeds, look for a reputable breeder...and...then start over again, LOL!  We have applications in to several rescues, but nothing suitable, yet.  What makes it hard is that we are looking for a good farm dog with a protective side.  We have to train them to accept the farm animals and be good with visitors and kids (they can be aloof, but not aggressive).  Because of this, we want to start with a puppy or young dog that is well-socialized.  So far, nothing from a rescue.

As far as breeders go, we really want to visit the dogs.  The puppy mill alarm goes off if:

1)  You raise many different breeds of dogs.  It's possible, but if there are more ten breeding dogs per breed....we have an issue.  

2)  You are reluctant for us to come and meet the dogs.

3)   You seem to always have puppies available.  

4)  Your website has lots of sappy stories, but no information on health screening or testing of parents.

5)  You insist on ear cropping puppies.

6)  You are at a flea market selling puppies when we call you.  

7)  You are a rescue with special needs dogs that have such severe health issues that they live in a crate 24/7.  But they make you money, so you keep them going.  

8)  You are a rescue that calls bully breed dogs a weird creative cross even though they are, quite clearly, a pit bull.  Don't lie.  Just tell us why the dog is a good pet.  

We have eliminated many breeds already due to shady breeders.  We are down to Australian Shepherds and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.  Collie is still in play as well, but we have to resolve the picking up part (the puppies will be ready this fall, but are 5 hours away).  

Edited by little cow

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Another question is how many litters a year the female has.  If it were me I would def not get an older or young dog but 8 weeks pup.  That way you can train the way you want.  The right puppy will come along.  What about a heeler mix.  They are a family/farm dog with the ability to protect.  Plus they don't get terribly big.

This weekend I was ask by a number of customer what I do to train because my dogs are so well behaved.  I always have a hard time answering that question as don't have one way to train.  Guess it come down to our family is more of a pack & the pack respects the family.

 

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CL, you might ask your vet. They know the clients and steer you in the direction of someone with what you want.

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Thanks, guys!

I had a cattle dog that I loved dearly, but she had serious health issues (she was a rescue pup).  My husband knew her last few years and, although he loved her, the health issues made a bad impression.

Our vet knows local breeders, but the only local breeds are small, toy types, or Goldens (not protective).  There was a Setter breeder, but she is a bit loony.

The Chessie is winning so far.  Puppies due next weekend.  Puppy ready by early August.

 

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I vote for collie. We had two or three when I was growing up. They're smart, protective and great herders. (Ours used to herd the chickens, LOL.)  They also are great with kids. One of the HC members, Mestengo, has a collie. PM her about breeders, maybe.

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Have you ever considered a Rottweiler? Trained correctly, they make a great stock dog plus very protective of your family. 

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No to Rottie.  My brother has them. He loves his dogs.  Just not a good dog for us.  We like herding and sporting breeds (or crosses).

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Maddie, our Springer, is a little mud puppy.  She will spot a puddle, beeline right for it, and do a belly flop right in the middle.  This isn't on just on hot days, mind you.  This is anytime.  Our old farm is very sandy, so, not such a big deal.  Our new farm is clay soil.  I took Maddie there after a big storm passed through and she had a great time.  Hosed her off before she got back inside the truck.  She is so good about her baths that it's no big deal to bathe her, thank goodness.  She doesn't like to swim, but she will play in puddles all day long. She is almost a water dog.  Our local dog park has a big pond, but she won't go near it.  Now, if we have a Chessie that can play in it, that would be great.  Maddie can remain our more terrestrial mud dog, lol!  We have both a deep sink and an extra big shower near the back door in the new house, just for doggie baths (well, muddy people, too).  

Edited by little cow

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1 hour ago, noponies said:

Rotties were bred to drive cattle and do it very well.

Yep, I know they were farm dogs.  Just don't want to have one because of personality.  

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Sounds like a Chessie would be a good fit. The retriever in a Chessie would be good around your farm critters.

Does your springer puddle jump couple minutes before you leave? We have a river & pond on the farm & Odie is classic for taking a dip right before we leave. Big wet dogs are not so much fun to have in the truck.

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LC,   Wish you well in your search for a pup,  I have no suggestions as, I'm no expert into what some breeds are best at. Just know if this pup will need a good disposition, part of that is personality & part of that is training.  Good luck on your search.  Best Wishes. PD

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Thakns for all the help and advice.  I will share pictures of the new pup.  The prospective Chessie pup will be ready to come home in August.  

I have to refresh my dog training technique. It's been five years since I trained a puppy.  :). I asked the breeder to recomend a good training book.

Edited by little cow

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I have a couple of books (they are packed in boxes already), but I love to read different training techniques so I can pick and choose what works best.  Water training and retrieval is what I really want to learn for this puppy.  I never taught a dog that before. 

It's like horse training books.  I read a ton and then come up with my own way from bits and pieces that I can do well.  I can't train like Buck Brannaman with a lariat, but I can use his other techniques.  

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I live in Connecticut, and there is a CT Herding Dog rescue group that has had some nice dogs and young ones in the past.  Have you looked specifically for herding dog rescues?  If there are any near you, that could be helpful.  Good luck LC!

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Thanks, Magic.  We have applications in to several rescues.  They don't have any dog suitable right now, but we will keep checking.  

 

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Howdy! I'll chime in here. 

We've always had collies. They're smart, gentle with everything, and good watch dogs rather than guard dogs. They come in both a rough and a smooth coat, with the smoothies better able to tolerate the heat and having more of a drover function.

Our last collie, Skye, was a tri rough. Our current collie, Evie, is a tri smooth. Despite both being from show/companion bloodlines, they showed strong herding instincts when tested.

Collie rescues are a good place to try, or I could ask Evie's breeder for a recommendation in your area. Evie's parents just had a litter, but they are up in Wisconsin and may all be spoken for.

M.

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Evie is not as much of a water dog as a Chessie, but she dries fast and enjoys the lake at the dog park. Good luck with whatever pup you choose.

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Oh wow, Mestango!  Beautiful dogs!  We are interested in a collie, but the breeder requires us to pick up the puppy and they live five hours away.  The time of year makes that very difficult for us.  

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A chessie really would be a good fit.  Go with what breed you are most comfortable with.

Dog hunting is not easy. 

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Seems dog hunting is getting harder & harder.  Days of the neighbors oops litter are gone when all you want is a good old mutt.  Then there is finding a good breeder.  

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15 hours ago, little cow said:

Oh wow, Mestango!  Beautiful dogs!  We are interested in a collie, but the breeder requires us to pick up the puppy and they live five hours away.  The time of year makes that very difficult for us.  

They are beautiful, smart, good natured and reasonably mellow. Since they seldom have the hunting/kill drive, they are safe with poultry, rabbits and other pets. That being said, there are many wonderful breeds and mixes to choose from. The key is to find which one works best for your family and situation. I am sure you will love whatever pup you bring home. Be sure to share pics since we all love puppies!

Edited by Mestengo
Because I can't abide typos.

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After uncovering a hidden link between out of state puppy mills and some local breeders, who appear legitimate, we are going with the Chessie.  This is a very rare litter for these breeders.  They have only a couple of dogs and the male is owned by someone else.  There is an entire website devoted to the mother of our future puppy.  Plus, they are close enough to visit.  

And, we received a photo last night.  The puppies were born!

Edited by little cow

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YAY!!!!!!!  You are going to be so happy with your new family/pack member.  Course we will mark this day on the calendar & if we don't have pictures in 9 weeks you are in trouble.

Just remembered.  Your house is going to be crazy with a puppy & a kitten.  

Edited by RailroadWoman

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Have you owned a Chessie before? They can be challenging to say the least. I'm on my 3rd, all females, and they are a great breed for the right home. I've got faith based on your posts I've seen over the years that you will do just fine with a Chessie. I've always referred to them as the most hard headed, sensitive breed I've ever seen. This picture is 2 of my girls. Kona in the background sniffing the air, she was 9 at the time (she will be 15 next Saturday) and Kali was 3 months old at the time.

Does the breeder breed for hunting or show dogs? Would love to know who the breeder is, we've had a heck of a time finding GOOD Chessie breeders... Would be willing to have one shipped once Kona is gone, which we think will be this summer. :(

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