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tarafreespirit

Is this a good pic for critique?

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No.     But the horse you posted looks healthy and shiny.

The following photo is how you take a pic of your horse for a conformation critique.
Stand the horse as square as you can, on flat, solid, level ground (no mud, dirt, gravel or grass to hide hooves or pasterns) so you can easily see all of the points and angles listed in this photo.
Image result for horse conformation photos

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Hopefully with a bit better hind leg conformation than this one has.

Edited by noponies
can't type

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There's a pinned photo at the top that suggests setting up the off legs in view. And as NP says, the picture in Heidi's post has the straight back legs that used to be so prevalent in Quarter Horse confirmation. I don't know about now, but post legs cause all kinds of problems.

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The horse in my pic doesn't have post legs, those back legs are as crooked as a snake with appendicitis!  LOL  They darn-near look like sickles.

I liked the pic because it showed the angles a proper conformation critique needs to see.

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7 hours ago, Heidi n Q said:

The horse in my pic doesn't have post legs, those back legs are as crooked as a snake with appendicitis!  LOL  They darn-near look like sickles.

I liked the pic because it showed the angles a proper conformation critique needs to see.

Although his pasterns are too straight, he IS sickle-hocked. Thank you.

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On 6/29/2018 at 11:00 PM, Heidi n Q said:

The horse in my pic doesn't have post legs, those back legs are as crooked as a snake with appendicitis!  LOL  They darn-near look like sickles.

I liked the pic because it showed the angles a proper conformation critique needs to see.

Hmm. Maybe I didn't look closely. But I'm not sure the angle is severe enough to call sickle hocks. Go find your protractor, LOL. He could also be set up badly.

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No protractor needed. Simply line up with a straight line, the point of buttock, point of hock, and rear point of fetlock. If all 3 points touch the line, even if the leg isn't placed straight, you have a perfectly conformed leg. If the point of hock is over the line, you have sickle hocks. If the other 2 points touch and the hock doesn't, you have post legged. The horse does not need to be standing square for this to be true.  Move the leg forward or back, and as long as the hoof is on the ground, it works.

Edited by noponies

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Please re-read, I did not outright call them sickle hocks.
I said they aren't post, they're too crooked and look closer to sickles than posts.

Related image

 

Edited by Heidi n Q

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10 minutes ago, Heidi n Q said:

Please re-read, I did not outright call them sickle hocks.
I said they aren't post, they're too crooked and look closer to sickles than posts.

Related image

 

You didn't but I did. And -E- is more of a hip/loin problem than a leg problem.

Edited by noponies

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Yeah, but she quoted me so I felt pulled into replying.  LOL   

E = hip/loin issue, or even pain?  The line of the croup/back makes me think of a horse all humped-up in pain.  Regardless, it isn't a good thing for the horse.

The pic I posted is only a moment in time and there are many things that could have been caught, or not, in the pic .... but I liked the lines on the photo that clearly show a person what needs to be visible in order for a good conformation shot to be taken and for someone to be able to give a good conformation critique.

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I agree they aren't post legs. But there is a definition of sickle hocks and it does involve the hock angle. And a horse can be positioned so that his conformation would look faulty when it really isn't. Even hoof angles can change a horse's stance to make conformation look off. And I'm going to bed now! :surrender:

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10 hours ago, jubal said:

I agree they aren't post legs. But there is a definition of sickle hocks and it does involve the hock angle. And a horse can be positioned so that his conformation would look faulty when it really isn't. Even hoof angles can change a horse's stance to make conformation look off. And I'm going to bed now! :surrender:

Yes, there is, and the tip I gave follows that measurement, as well as the stance difference. Looks can deceive, but this does take care of that. You could actually check it out yourself.

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