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Cheri Wolfe

photo of overcheck

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Well, I finally got the photobucket thing to work. Here is a photo of the overcheck in place on one of our 2 year olds. If a horse really wants to be bronchy, I would shorten it up a bit from the one shown. I have ridden horses with overchecks on them for about 35 years. It has saves my neck to many times to count.

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Well, I finally got the photobucket thing to work. Here is a photo of the overcheck in place on one of our 2 year olds. If a horse really wants to be bronchy, I would shorten it up a bit from the one shown. I have ridden horses with overchecks on them for about 35 years. It has saves my neck to many times to count.

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I have used overchecks with driving horses and they go over the head.

That is a side check.

Driving bridles have two rings for the sidecheck, right below the browband, where it attaches to the side pieces.

It is my understanding that such should not be used to ride in, because if a horse were to trip, it would be restricted in how much it can regain it's balance.

I understand that at times you have to use what you need to use and take your chances, but I would not consider it a tool to be used regularly, since it is one more way to get in trouble.

I would also attach it to the horn with a quick release knot, so it can be turned loose if absolutely necessary.

[ 12-18-2005, 04:47 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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I have used overchecks with driving horses and they go over the head.

That is a side check.

Driving bridles have two rings for the sidecheck, right below the browband, where it attaches to the side pieces.

It is my understanding that such should not be used to ride in, because if a horse were to trip, it would be restricted in how much it can regain it's balance.

I understand that at times you have to use what you need to use and take your chances, but I would not consider it a tool to be used regularly, since it is one more way to get in trouble.

I would also attach it to the horn with a quick release knot, so it can be turned loose if absolutely necessary.

[ 12-18-2005, 04:47 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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Ok I missed this discussion obviously, so bare with me Cheri. What is an overcheck exactly and how does it work? Is it attached to one side of the bit? Dang I bet you explained all this before. [Duh]

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Ok I missed this discussion obviously, so bare with me Cheri. What is an overcheck exactly and how does it work? Is it attached to one side of the bit? Dang I bet you explained all this before. [Duh]

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Side checks are clipped to the ring in the snaffle, between the cheek piece and the reins.

That is an inventive way to use a halter to support the sidecheck, when we don't have driving bridles made for that handy.

I like that the full cheeck snaffle is not tied back with keepers, as is regulation for showing.

That restricts the movement of the snaffle and at times it pokes a horse's mouth, as an article in the Quarter Horse Journal several years ago showed, with X-rays of bits and the different positions they were active in a horse's mouth as the reins were picked up.

[ 12-18-2005, 06:42 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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Side checks are clipped to the ring in the snaffle, between the cheek piece and the reins.

That is an inventive way to use a halter to support the sidecheck, when we don't have driving bridles made for that handy.

I like that the full cheeck snaffle is not tied back with keepers, as is regulation for showing.

That restricts the movement of the snaffle and at times it pokes a horse's mouth, as an article in the Quarter Horse Journal several years ago showed, with X-rays of bits and the different positions they were active in a horse's mouth as the reins were picked up.

[ 12-18-2005, 06:42 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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i will try to find the post where she explained it to me.

Cheri, This is done on both sides right?

By the way...THANKS

overcheck explination

I was asking how to keep a horse from bucking. Cheris reply is about 4 or 5 down

[ 12-18-2005, 06:54 PM: Message edited by: shellyh1971 ]

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i will try to find the post where she explained it to me.

Cheri, This is done on both sides right?

By the way...THANKS

overcheck explination

I was asking how to keep a horse from bucking. Cheris reply is about 4 or 5 down

[ 12-18-2005, 06:54 PM: Message edited by: shellyh1971 ]

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Would make more sense if they were two, like in a regular sidecheck, but I wouldn't know, when used like that... [Confused]

I had a colt fall slowly with me when loping and his head kept getting lower and lower, before flopping to the side.

Vet said he fainted. [Roll Eyes]

If he had one of those, he could not have stretched his head enough and would have gone head over heels. [Eek!]

If you are trying that, I would use it for the least time you can get by.

Cheri said that she used it for years without an accident, so maybe it is safe?

[ 12-18-2005, 07:03 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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Would make more sense if they were two, like in a regular sidecheck, but I wouldn't know, when used like that... [Confused]

I had a colt fall slowly with me when loping and his head kept getting lower and lower, before flopping to the side.

Vet said he fainted. [Roll Eyes]

If he had one of those, he could not have stretched his head enough and would have gone head over heels. [Eek!]

If you are trying that, I would use it for the least time you can get by.

Cheri said that she used it for years without an accident, so maybe it is safe?

[ 12-18-2005, 07:03 PM: Message edited by: Merry ]

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Okay. Here is a description of the overcheck that I gave on a different post. (I know, technocally it is similar to a driving sidechek which is what inspired me to do this over 30 years ago).

quote:

Put a nylon web halter on the horse. Put your bridle on over the halter.

Take an 8 or 9 foot piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord. (I prefer the kind that is tightly machine braided as opposed to 3 strand twisted.)

Attach it to your bit on the off (right) side with a good knot. (I use bowline knots but any knot that won't loosen will work.)

Run the rest of the rope through the top ring on the halter (the ring just below the horse's ear) and run it behind the saddle horn. Leave about 4 or 5 extra inched of rope behind the saddle horn.

Then, run it through the top ring on the left side of the halter and tie it to the left side of the bit.

Then take the slack rope behind the saddle horn, make sure the horse's head is straight and fold it over itself to make a double half hitch that can't come off of the saddle horn.

Let the horse jog around with it and make sure it is the right length. He should bump it before his neck gets out level in front of him. You can longe him with it or work in a round pen with it. I usually don't get on one until he has felt it there and run into it a few times.

I have never had it cause a horse to rear or do anything worse than stop himself when he hits it. It does free you up to where you can push him forward without him dropping his head any lower. I usualy ride everyhting with two girths. I have seen really tough broncs that could pull a saddle up on their neck but I don't think most of you are dealing with that kind of horse.

There, that is the description I gave of it on the other post. I had several people that wanted to see how it worked.

It works amazingly well. It DOES go to both sides of the bit in identical fashion. In the beginning, I only used it for ground driving. I still do every time I drive a colt as they can't duck their head down to avoid properly responding to the bit.

It was so effective in keeping a horse's head where I wanted it that I started riding regularly with one on the first few rides. I have NEVER had a colt go down with one. As a matter of fact there are 2 or 3 times that the check caught a stumbling colt and kept his nose up and probably kept him from going down.

It is really effective on colts that want to 'kick up' or 'play' as you can push them forward out of it instead of having to pull them up to save yourself. It is also very effective with a saddled colt on the longe line. I NEVER want a colt to practice bucking on a longe line, but like riding, you can't stop them and keep them going forward. This little gizmo really does make this possible.

It can be made more effective and severe by using a tight cavason or noseband. It can be used with a curb bit on a 'broke' that has gotten 'cold backed' with an inexperienced rider that did not read the horse correctly. You just fasten it to the same top ring on the bit that the headstall fastens to.

I shorten it up on a really bronchy colt and then take one of the loops off of the saddle horse after he is warmed up. I set it looser than shown when I am ground driving a horse.

Several other other people that we have worked with over the years have also adopted using one and do this day I don't know of anyone that has gotten in trouble because of one. All the people we know have said quite the contrary - they got to where they wouldn't be without one in the tough circumstances.

I am not trying to tell anyone to use one, but, keep it in mind the next time you ride a colt and his head disapears and you didn't grab him in time or the next time you are forced to pull a horse up instead of push him forward like you know you should have.

[ 12-18-2005, 09:46 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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Okay. Here is a description of the overcheck that I gave on a different post. (I know, technocally it is similar to a driving sidechek which is what inspired me to do this over 30 years ago).

quote:

Put a nylon web halter on the horse. Put your bridle on over the halter.

Take an 8 or 9 foot piece of 1/4 inch nylon cord. (I prefer the kind that is tightly machine braided as opposed to 3 strand twisted.)

Attach it to your bit on the off (right) side with a good knot. (I use bowline knots but any knot that won't loosen will work.)

Run the rest of the rope through the top ring on the halter (the ring just below the horse's ear) and run it behind the saddle horn. Leave about 4 or 5 extra inched of rope behind the saddle horn.

Then, run it through the top ring on the left side of the halter and tie it to the left side of the bit.

Then take the slack rope behind the saddle horn, make sure the horse's head is straight and fold it over itself to make a double half hitch that can't come off of the saddle horn.

Let the horse jog around with it and make sure it is the right length. He should bump it before his neck gets out level in front of him. You can longe him with it or work in a round pen with it. I usually don't get on one until he has felt it there and run into it a few times.

I have never had it cause a horse to rear or do anything worse than stop himself when he hits it. It does free you up to where you can push him forward without him dropping his head any lower. I usualy ride everyhting with two girths. I have seen really tough broncs that could pull a saddle up on their neck but I don't think most of you are dealing with that kind of horse.

There, that is the description I gave of it on the other post. I had several people that wanted to see how it worked.

It works amazingly well. It DOES go to both sides of the bit in identical fashion. In the beginning, I only used it for ground driving. I still do every time I drive a colt as they can't duck their head down to avoid properly responding to the bit.

It was so effective in keeping a horse's head where I wanted it that I started riding regularly with one on the first few rides. I have NEVER had a colt go down with one. As a matter of fact there are 2 or 3 times that the check caught a stumbling colt and kept his nose up and probably kept him from going down.

It is really effective on colts that want to 'kick up' or 'play' as you can push them forward out of it instead of having to pull them up to save yourself. It is also very effective with a saddled colt on the longe line. I NEVER want a colt to practice bucking on a longe line, but like riding, you can't stop them and keep them going forward. This little gizmo really does make this possible.

It can be made more effective and severe by using a tight cavason or noseband. It can be used with a curb bit on a 'broke' that has gotten 'cold backed' with an inexperienced rider that did not read the horse correctly. You just fasten it to the same top ring on the bit that the headstall fastens to.

I shorten it up on a really bronchy colt and then take one of the loops off of the saddle horse after he is warmed up. I set it looser than shown when I am ground driving a horse.

Several other other people that we have worked with over the years have also adopted using one and do this day I don't know of anyone that has gotten in trouble because of one. All the people we know have said quite the contrary - they got to where they wouldn't be without one in the tough circumstances.

I am not trying to tell anyone to use one, but, keep it in mind the next time you ride a colt and his head disapears and you didn't grab him in time or the next time you are forced to pull a horse up instead of push him forward like you know you should have.

[ 12-18-2005, 09:46 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I have never heard of such a thing. Thank God I have never had to use one. If you work with the horse and build a bond with them I see no reason for this thing. I trained my Arab started with a lot of ground work and sacking out. By the time she was old enough to ride, she was great. She is 7 and has never bucked or anything. I really do not see a need for something like this. But then again I don't agree with what a lot of "show people" do with their horses. It is a shame that a horse can not carry his head the way he should naturally. Instead of being forced to carry it "your way" as you said.

Different strokes for different folks

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I have never heard of such a thing. Thank God I have never had to use one. If you work with the horse and build a bond with them I see no reason for this thing. I trained my Arab started with a lot of ground work and sacking out. By the time she was old enough to ride, she was great. She is 7 and has never bucked or anything. I really do not see a need for something like this. But then again I don't agree with what a lot of "show people" do with their horses. It is a shame that a horse can not carry his head the way he should naturally. Instead of being forced to carry it "your way" as you said.

Different strokes for different folks

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quote:

Originally posted by 2quartersandanarab:

I have never heard of such a thing. Thank God I have never had to use one. If you work with the horse and build a bond with them I see no reason for this thing. I trained my Arab started with a lot of ground work and sacking out. By the time she was old enough to ride, she was great. She is 7 and has never bucked or anything.

You've broke one horse?

By the time you get to your 100th horse, you might see why a simple little device like that can get you safely to the spot where the colt is well trained enough to respond to rein pressure only.

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quote:

Originally posted by 2quartersandanarab:

I have never heard of such a thing. Thank God I have never had to use one. If you work with the horse and build a bond with them I see no reason for this thing. I trained my Arab started with a lot of ground work and sacking out. By the time she was old enough to ride, she was great. She is 7 and has never bucked or anything.

You've broke one horse?

By the time you get to your 100th horse, you might see why a simple little device like that can get you safely to the spot where the colt is well trained enough to respond to rein pressure only.

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hmmm careful how you catigorize us 'show ppl' .. im glad you are blessed wiht a horse that has never thrown you a buck, but I belive that the way I want my horse to carry his head has to do wiht supplness and balance ... i dont do or use anythign that is cruel to my horse.

I think that this is a tool, like most tools that can be a huge asset to problem horses, and if put into the wrong hands, can be used in a cruel way. So pls dont critisize groups of ppl and what they wnat and work for ust becuase its not your 'stroke'

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hmmm careful how you catigorize us 'show ppl' .. im glad you are blessed wiht a horse that has never thrown you a buck, but I belive that the way I want my horse to carry his head has to do wiht supplness and balance ... i dont do or use anythign that is cruel to my horse.

I think that this is a tool, like most tools that can be a huge asset to problem horses, and if put into the wrong hands, can be used in a cruel way. So pls dont critisize groups of ppl and what they wnat and work for ust becuase its not your 'stroke'

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I can't believe what I am reading. When did a sidecheck or overcheck get to be cruel? Every horse pulling a buggy or cart wears one only they are much shorter on show driving horses. It has no effect until a horse tries to buck or play. I only use it until I am comfortable that a horse has no intention of bucking or playing - usually the first few minutes of the first few rides. It keeps a rider FROM having to jerk a horse's mouth to keep him from bucking your a-- off. The editors of 'Performance Horse' magazine thought enough of it to buy and publish an article last january that I wrote for them. The photo I put in this post was one published in that magazine. I have had several people write and call me after that article came out to tell me how effective it was for them when they used it.

Besides, if a horse getting it's head down and trying to buck someone off was so rare, why are there so many post on this forum from people want to know what to do about it? When I first mentioned this overcheck it was in an answer to someone have a problem with a horse trying to buck. Maybe they should hire 2quartersandanarab instead to fix their spoiled horse.

I used to be break over 50 colts a year with NO help. I had to do it during the 7 - 8 months out of the year that there were not feet of ice and snow on the ground where I lived in the mountains of Colorado. Most of the horses brought to me to break had already been screwed up by someone who thought they could break them themselves and all they did was spoil them. In my lifetime, I've started somewhere between 800 and 1000 horses. All I'm saying is that I have found it a very valuable tool in the right circumstances and though I would share it with you. Take it or leave it but don't call it cruel because it isn't.

[ 12-18-2005, 11:05 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I can't believe what I am reading. When did a sidecheck or overcheck get to be cruel? Every horse pulling a buggy or cart wears one only they are much shorter on show driving horses. It has no effect until a horse tries to buck or play. I only use it until I am comfortable that a horse has no intention of bucking or playing - usually the first few minutes of the first few rides. It keeps a rider FROM having to jerk a horse's mouth to keep him from bucking your a-- off. The editors of 'Performance Horse' magazine thought enough of it to buy and publish an article last january that I wrote for them. The photo I put in this post was one published in that magazine. I have had several people write and call me after that article came out to tell me how effective it was for them when they used it.

Besides, if a horse getting it's head down and trying to buck someone off was so rare, why are there so many post on this forum from people want to know what to do about it? When I first mentioned this overcheck it was in an answer to someone have a problem with a horse trying to buck. Maybe they should hire 2quartersandanarab instead to fix their spoiled horse.

I used to be break over 50 colts a year with NO help. I had to do it during the 7 - 8 months out of the year that there were not feet of ice and snow on the ground where I lived in the mountains of Colorado. Most of the horses brought to me to break had already been screwed up by someone who thought they could break them themselves and all they did was spoil them. In my lifetime, I've started somewhere between 800 and 1000 horses. All I'm saying is that I have found it a very valuable tool in the right circumstances and though I would share it with you. Take it or leave it but don't call it cruel because it isn't.

[ 12-18-2005, 11:05 PM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I think the poster may have been confused...thinking you were trying to achieve a "headset" with this, instead of the true purpose...to keep a horse from bucking.

Perhaps, if the poster goes to the thread that was referenced, she'll understand the use for the overcheck.

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I think the poster may have been confused...thinking you were trying to achieve a "headset" with this, instead of the true purpose...to keep a horse from bucking.

Perhaps, if the poster goes to the thread that was referenced, she'll understand the use for the overcheck.

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