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lippyswm

Affraid of my horses

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I have ridden horses for about 20 years and was never affraid of them. I have not had one for about 8 years now and just purchesed a 5 YO TB gelding. We had been just trotting around for the past 2 weeks and doing natural horsemanship ground work and I thought he was doing great. One day I brought home another horse and noticed he wasnt happy about it. I saddled him up and started to ride. He stopped at the fence to check the other one out, he didnt want to move so I tapped him on (what I thought was the rump but was the flank) and he EXPLODED into horrbile bucks. I went off and hit HARD. He continued to buck after he dumped me and was caught by my mom. I am 42 and my bones are not as elastice as they use to be so I was Hurt. I was affraid of him after that and sent him to training. The trainer has NOT had a problem with him yet (after 2 weeks) so I rode him in the area with the trainerm and he was good. I am still affraid of him. How do I get over this fear of getting hurt again> [Me Cry]

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I have ridden horses for about 20 years and was never affraid of them. I have not had one for about 8 years now and just purchesed a 5 YO TB gelding. We had been just trotting around for the past 2 weeks and doing natural horsemanship ground work and I thought he was doing great. One day I brought home another horse and noticed he wasnt happy about it. I saddled him up and started to ride. He stopped at the fence to check the other one out, he didnt want to move so I tapped him on (what I thought was the rump but was the flank) and he EXPLODED into horrbile bucks. I went off and hit HARD. He continued to buck after he dumped me and was caught by my mom. I am 42 and my bones are not as elastice as they use to be so I was Hurt. I was affraid of him after that and sent him to training. The trainer has NOT had a problem with him yet (after 2 weeks) so I rode him in the area with the trainerm and he was good. I am still affraid of him. How do I get over this fear of getting hurt again> [Me Cry]

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I know how you feel, since becoming a mum I have been much more carful not to hurt myself. The only advice I can offer you is that you put that horse away for awhile or sell him. Then please go and buy yourself a more seasoned horse so you can ride without problems. Its just not worth getting hurt or making yourself fix the problem. Even if you can or could fix him would it be worth it? Because there is that chance you could get hurt.

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I know how you feel, since becoming a mum I have been much more carful not to hurt myself. The only advice I can offer you is that you put that horse away for awhile or sell him. Then please go and buy yourself a more seasoned horse so you can ride without problems. Its just not worth getting hurt or making yourself fix the problem. Even if you can or could fix him would it be worth it? Because there is that chance you could get hurt.

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You may have more horse than your current riding phase demands.

After a long lay out, a more calm and less reactive horse may be better for you.

It takes many people trying several horses to find the right match, so don't despair.

I am a trainer and for the last year have some health issues, balance is not quite right and bought a super nice horse, but he is really wound up.

I rode him several times working cattle and it is all I could do to keep him from acting up, read take off bucking at the least provocation.

Normally I would have worked with him and get him over that, but didn't want to keep taking chances.

My neighbor, a cowboy by trade and 20 years younger rode him one day for two hours to pen some cattle and coming back he said that he didn't want to ride him again, that it took a bronc rider to stay with him, that he was too much horse for him. That horse never did quit trying to dump him, even when tired. [Eek!]

There were no saddle or other issues, just a very forward, light, hyper and strong horse, the kind taht get's hotter the more you ride them, rather than relax into the ride.

Some are like that, especially some King Bailey's.

Sometimes, a horse is too much for us, unless we are in the right situation to change him to suit us and have the kind of steady riding such horses demand.

If you don't have the situation to keep working safely with him, you may ought to think of getting a horse you may enjoy working with more.

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You may have more horse than your current riding phase demands.

After a long lay out, a more calm and less reactive horse may be better for you.

It takes many people trying several horses to find the right match, so don't despair.

I am a trainer and for the last year have some health issues, balance is not quite right and bought a super nice horse, but he is really wound up.

I rode him several times working cattle and it is all I could do to keep him from acting up, read take off bucking at the least provocation.

Normally I would have worked with him and get him over that, but didn't want to keep taking chances.

My neighbor, a cowboy by trade and 20 years younger rode him one day for two hours to pen some cattle and coming back he said that he didn't want to ride him again, that it took a bronc rider to stay with him, that he was too much horse for him. That horse never did quit trying to dump him, even when tired. [Eek!]

There were no saddle or other issues, just a very forward, light, hyper and strong horse, the kind taht get's hotter the more you ride them, rather than relax into the ride.

Some are like that, especially some King Bailey's.

Sometimes, a horse is too much for us, unless we are in the right situation to change him to suit us and have the kind of steady riding such horses demand.

If you don't have the situation to keep working safely with him, you may ought to think of getting a horse you may enjoy working with more.

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There is nothing more scarey than being over-mounted. As we get older (and hopefully wiser) we realize that the joy we get from riding is not worth the risk of injury. I know many professional trainers who have to work with young or green horses and as they became older, find that good, young riders with hard bones are worth their weight in gold. Horses must be confident in their rider as leader and if you are unsure neither of you will benefit from this partnership. If you are riding for pleasure I would consider finding a better match for yourself and this horse. Do both of you a favor.

[ 07-09-2006, 08:10 AM: Message edited by: lightness ]

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There is nothing more scarey than being over-mounted. As we get older (and hopefully wiser) we realize that the joy we get from riding is not worth the risk of injury. I know many professional trainers who have to work with young or green horses and as they became older, find that good, young riders with hard bones are worth their weight in gold. Horses must be confident in their rider as leader and if you are unsure neither of you will benefit from this partnership. If you are riding for pleasure I would consider finding a better match for yourself and this horse. Do both of you a favor.

[ 07-09-2006, 08:10 AM: Message edited by: lightness ]

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Dittos...

The other thing to keep in mind though was that when this happened, you had just brought home another horse, haven't had THIS one very long, and you noticed that he was agitated before you even got on him. Big changes at your barn can induce crazy horse behavior. [Wink] I'm not saying it's an EXCUSE...but it could've been the reason. Especially since you've got him at the trainer's place and he's doing well.

Sometimes, we have to choose our battles to win the war so to speak. When you're not getting paid to ride, you can choose to ride or you can choose not to. And I think this might have been one of those times where some lunging or round pen work may have been in order to gauge him prior to riding.

As far as now? Well, you need to get some good rides under your belt. Preferably with your trainer on the ground coaching you along.

But, as the others said, it may just be that this isn't the horse for you...that it's going to kill your confidence and sour you on riding.

To me, one bucking episode, especially in the context you described, is not a indicator that the horse is unrideable.

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Dittos...

The other thing to keep in mind though was that when this happened, you had just brought home another horse, haven't had THIS one very long, and you noticed that he was agitated before you even got on him. Big changes at your barn can induce crazy horse behavior. [Wink] I'm not saying it's an EXCUSE...but it could've been the reason. Especially since you've got him at the trainer's place and he's doing well.

Sometimes, we have to choose our battles to win the war so to speak. When you're not getting paid to ride, you can choose to ride or you can choose not to. And I think this might have been one of those times where some lunging or round pen work may have been in order to gauge him prior to riding.

As far as now? Well, you need to get some good rides under your belt. Preferably with your trainer on the ground coaching you along.

But, as the others said, it may just be that this isn't the horse for you...that it's going to kill your confidence and sour you on riding.

To me, one bucking episode, especially in the context you described, is not a indicator that the horse is unrideable.

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Lippy (just love that name!!) :-D

I am 44, have ridden and owned horses and ponies since I was a very little girl, and have always had a good dose of healthy fear. Unfortunately (or possibly, fortunate?) that I also am so obsessed and nuts about equines that I can't drag myself away.

It took me almost this long to learn that my fear could be one of my greatest assets. The trick was to listen carefully to my instincts.

While I could possibly be the slowest to progress horseman that you'll ever meet [big Grin] I rarely get hurt, either.

I cope at this point by not breeding and training youngsters any more. I found other ways to satisfy my need to grow in my skills, and to keep my slow-healing self out of harms way. I currently work with Lucy, who is tiny and goofy, and needs tons of work. And my husband-horse, Monty, who by standards here is small and so doggone thick and slow it takes a stick of dynamite under him to get him to move. And with Lilly (new rider) and Toad (green, sweet pony). I had to adapt my activities to my age, health and desire to be challenged.

Hope that helped some... Fear need not be a negative emotion.

Lynn P

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Lippy (just love that name!!) :-D

I am 44, have ridden and owned horses and ponies since I was a very little girl, and have always had a good dose of healthy fear. Unfortunately (or possibly, fortunate?) that I also am so obsessed and nuts about equines that I can't drag myself away.

It took me almost this long to learn that my fear could be one of my greatest assets. The trick was to listen carefully to my instincts.

While I could possibly be the slowest to progress horseman that you'll ever meet [big Grin] I rarely get hurt, either.

I cope at this point by not breeding and training youngsters any more. I found other ways to satisfy my need to grow in my skills, and to keep my slow-healing self out of harms way. I currently work with Lucy, who is tiny and goofy, and needs tons of work. And my husband-horse, Monty, who by standards here is small and so doggone thick and slow it takes a stick of dynamite under him to get him to move. And with Lilly (new rider) and Toad (green, sweet pony). I had to adapt my activities to my age, health and desire to be challenged.

Hope that helped some... Fear need not be a negative emotion.

Lynn P

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I can say that I am going through the same thing. Long story, but the short of it is, that I sold my horse that had dumped me and went and found my self the most laid back horse on the planet. I still can't ride but on those days that I try, she just stands by my mounting block and goes to sleep, it's her way of saying "hey I get it, take your time and I'll take my nap". I don't know when or even if I'll ever get on agian but, I'll tell you what it helps to know that if I decide to right now, my horse isn't gonna give me even a little trouble. I hope your find your horsey leggs agian soon, and when you do let me know how you did it.

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I can say that I am going through the same thing. Long story, but the short of it is, that I sold my horse that had dumped me and went and found my self the most laid back horse on the planet. I still can't ride but on those days that I try, she just stands by my mounting block and goes to sleep, it's her way of saying "hey I get it, take your time and I'll take my nap". I don't know when or even if I'll ever get on agian but, I'll tell you what it helps to know that if I decide to right now, my horse isn't gonna give me even a little trouble. I hope your find your horsey leggs agian soon, and when you do let me know how you did it.

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thank you for all the responses. Thank you BuddyRoo and Feeeeline for your advise. I think it is something I need to get over because Jasper (my horse in training) so far is doing well with the trainer. He wants me to come in and work with him and Jasper. He said he hasnt done a thing regarding bucking or rearing. I think it was my fault as to the timing of riding him as I said he was NOT in a good mood because of the new horse being brought home and put in HIS stall. I rode Jasper last night and at first I was affraid but then calmed down and it was nothing. I think the fear of my old accident years ago when my horse bolted on me and ran into the road and fell on me sticks in the back of my head. Im going to work on it because both these horses are really good horses, its a ME issue not a THEM issue. They both canter and lope real nice they are just young. I am also going to put my other one into training as well. Thanks for all the comments. [smiley Wavey]

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thank you for all the responses. Thank you BuddyRoo and Feeeeline for your advise. I think it is something I need to get over because Jasper (my horse in training) so far is doing well with the trainer. He wants me to come in and work with him and Jasper. He said he hasnt done a thing regarding bucking or rearing. I think it was my fault as to the timing of riding him as I said he was NOT in a good mood because of the new horse being brought home and put in HIS stall. I rode Jasper last night and at first I was affraid but then calmed down and it was nothing. I think the fear of my old accident years ago when my horse bolted on me and ran into the road and fell on me sticks in the back of my head. Im going to work on it because both these horses are really good horses, its a ME issue not a THEM issue. They both canter and lope real nice they are just young. I am also going to put my other one into training as well. Thanks for all the comments. [smiley Wavey]

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Lippy...one more thing...if you have a fear of a horse bolting on you, why don't you have your trainer show you a few things that you can do when you get nervous or feel out of control?

For example, the one-rein stop or pulley rein? (HOLA? Are you READING THIS??? [Wink] ) Have the trainer show you where the buttons are on THIS horse. Because as soon as you get nervous, that is going to translate to the horse. One of the hardest skills to acquire as a horseman is to exude cool and calm when you're actually pretty nervous/mad/scared/etc. Since the horses read us so well, our nervousness tends to exacerbate any hint of trouble....The calmer you can be, the better you can outhink your horse and get him calm too...

Sounds like you're on the right path. Best of luck!

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Lippy...one more thing...if you have a fear of a horse bolting on you, why don't you have your trainer show you a few things that you can do when you get nervous or feel out of control?

For example, the one-rein stop or pulley rein? (HOLA? Are you READING THIS??? [Wink] ) Have the trainer show you where the buttons are on THIS horse. Because as soon as you get nervous, that is going to translate to the horse. One of the hardest skills to acquire as a horseman is to exude cool and calm when you're actually pretty nervous/mad/scared/etc. Since the horses read us so well, our nervousness tends to exacerbate any hint of trouble....The calmer you can be, the better you can outhink your horse and get him calm too...

Sounds like you're on the right path. Best of luck!

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you also might want to check out a book by (ack - I'm drawing a blank - another age related thing... Susan.....?) anyway, it is a sysyem of breathing and mental exercises that help you overcome your fears - and I know a few people who swear by them - it'll probably come to me in the middle of the night, I'll post back

at any rate - don't give yourself a hard time - with age comes wisdom, remember? [Cool]

edited to add useful link

http://www.positivelyriding.com/home.html

[ 07-09-2006, 03:18 PM: Message edited by: leoned ]

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you also might want to check out a book by (ack - I'm drawing a blank - another age related thing... Susan.....?) anyway, it is a sysyem of breathing and mental exercises that help you overcome your fears - and I know a few people who swear by them - it'll probably come to me in the middle of the night, I'll post back

at any rate - don't give yourself a hard time - with age comes wisdom, remember? [Cool]

edited to add useful link

http://www.positivelyriding.com/home.html

[ 07-09-2006, 03:18 PM: Message edited by: leoned ]

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I agree totally with others who have said to get to know this horse better. I bought a running bred gelding, supposedly bomb proof type of horse as my first horse as an adult -- I was about 38. He dumped me after I'd had him a few weeks. Was I scared? You bet. Not terrified, but very wary after that. I had butterflies a lot before rides. I called up the guy I bought from him and asked him if the horse had a bucking problem. He of course said, no.

I took the horse to a trainer. That was the best thing I could have done. I found out that I couldn't ride him fresh out of the barn. He requires management of his "tank" with lunging. He also doesn't do well with limited turnout. That just makes him hot, hot, hot = hours of lunging. He gets overtly excited at cows -- not that he wants to chase them, he's actually petrified of them. He also does not tolerate seeing other horses running or playing. It triggers something inside his head that says, "YEEHAWWWWW!!!!!". New experiences can sometimes be a challenge with him and other times he's a dead head.

The trainer helped me to gauge his reactions, watching his ears, feeling his body tense. When I feel those things, I have "defusing" things that I can do. The one rein stop is good. Also, just bumping his head away from whatever is going on that is potentially exciting and getting his attention back on me is very effective in calming him.

He's 16 now, and much, much more "broke" than he was when I purchased him at 7.

I'm so glad I didn't give up on him and I'm glad I rode a few rank ponies after I had developed balance and a seat as a child. That helped my fear factor not to have been as bad as it might have.

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I agree totally with others who have said to get to know this horse better. I bought a running bred gelding, supposedly bomb proof type of horse as my first horse as an adult -- I was about 38. He dumped me after I'd had him a few weeks. Was I scared? You bet. Not terrified, but very wary after that. I had butterflies a lot before rides. I called up the guy I bought from him and asked him if the horse had a bucking problem. He of course said, no.

I took the horse to a trainer. That was the best thing I could have done. I found out that I couldn't ride him fresh out of the barn. He requires management of his "tank" with lunging. He also doesn't do well with limited turnout. That just makes him hot, hot, hot = hours of lunging. He gets overtly excited at cows -- not that he wants to chase them, he's actually petrified of them. He also does not tolerate seeing other horses running or playing. It triggers something inside his head that says, "YEEHAWWWWW!!!!!". New experiences can sometimes be a challenge with him and other times he's a dead head.

The trainer helped me to gauge his reactions, watching his ears, feeling his body tense. When I feel those things, I have "defusing" things that I can do. The one rein stop is good. Also, just bumping his head away from whatever is going on that is potentially exciting and getting his attention back on me is very effective in calming him.

He's 16 now, and much, much more "broke" than he was when I purchased him at 7.

I'm so glad I didn't give up on him and I'm glad I rode a few rank ponies after I had developed balance and a seat as a child. That helped my fear factor not to have been as bad as it might have.

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I will keep checking Leoned for the book you are talking about. Hopefully it doesnt keep you up thinking about it. I really dont want to give up on my horse because who is to say that the next horse I get that is "suppose" to be BOMB proof as the last person said really isnt and Im right back where I started from. I will talk to my trainer and have him give me some emergency stopping pointers and go from there. He really is trying hard to learn. I will keep you all posted on his progress. As soon as I get ANOTHER camera I will post some pics of the boys.

ttyal

[Jump]

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I will keep checking Leoned for the book you are talking about. Hopefully it doesnt keep you up thinking about it. I really dont want to give up on my horse because who is to say that the next horse I get that is "suppose" to be BOMB proof as the last person said really isnt and Im right back where I started from. I will talk to my trainer and have him give me some emergency stopping pointers and go from there. He really is trying hard to learn. I will keep you all posted on his progress. As soon as I get ANOTHER camera I will post some pics of the boys.

ttyal

[Jump]

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Lippy I know how you feel as a child I got thrown from a little Palomino Pony and dragged about 300 feet my boot got stuck into the sturrip and I could not get it out untill I kicked it off I can remember seeing the hooves by my head but my parents made me get back on they said if you don't you will be afraid the rest of your life so I did, when I was in my late teens I had a QTR horse that had some real problems in the winter (back in MI.) if he steped on ice and hear the cracking of it under his feet he would bolt or rear up! I would get right back on him so I would not be afraid!

I'm 20 some yrs older now and I wear a helmet hopefully I have learned from past exper. and will not get hurt but at the same time that is a chance I take while ridding.

Heather

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Lippy I know how you feel as a child I got thrown from a little Palomino Pony and dragged about 300 feet my boot got stuck into the sturrip and I could not get it out untill I kicked it off I can remember seeing the hooves by my head but my parents made me get back on they said if you don't you will be afraid the rest of your life so I did, when I was in my late teens I had a QTR horse that had some real problems in the winter (back in MI.) if he steped on ice and hear the cracking of it under his feet he would bolt or rear up! I would get right back on him so I would not be afraid!

I'm 20 some yrs older now and I wear a helmet hopefully I have learned from past exper. and will not get hurt but at the same time that is a chance I take while ridding.

Heather

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