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how to train my horse to lope

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hello everyone. i need help on teaching my 3 year old quarter horse/standardbred/welsh filly to lope.she is fine at a trot but she does not go into a lope..i have tried pushing her into a lope once and she bucked since then i have been takin it slowly..i would like any suggestions anybody has...thanks in advance

Shauna

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hello everyone. i need help on teaching my 3 year old quarter horse/standardbred/welsh filly to lope.she is fine at a trot but she does not go into a lope..i have tried pushing her into a lope once and she bucked since then i have been takin it slowly..i would like any suggestions anybody has...thanks in advance

Shauna

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I kept asking for it more and more insistantly and once she started the lope i eased on the pressure. i kept asked even if she bucked and what not

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I kept asking for it more and more insistantly and once she started the lope i eased on the pressure. i kept asked even if she bucked and what not

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Work her in a round pen, or lunge line. Move her up into a lope and make her keep it, release and let her walk, and reward her. She'll get the feel of loping (and bucking) but you won't be in danger of getting thrown. Make her lope both ways. Be patient and take your time...

[smiley Wavey]

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Work her in a round pen, or lunge line. Move her up into a lope and make her keep it, release and let her walk, and reward her. She'll get the feel of loping (and bucking) but you won't be in danger of getting thrown. Make her lope both ways. Be patient and take your time...

[smiley Wavey]

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If she lunges in the roundpen already, have someone stand in the middle and cue her while you ride. Start with walk and trot and than a nice extended trot. With a little more ask both verbal and from the ground person you can tip her into canter. It's really important to keep your hands forward! Absolutely do not check her back or grab her mouth. This will merely cause more problems. Ride nice and confident but loosely follow her. It's all about the forward motion. Good Luck!

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If she lunges in the roundpen already, have someone stand in the middle and cue her while you ride. Start with walk and trot and than a nice extended trot. With a little more ask both verbal and from the ground person you can tip her into canter. It's really important to keep your hands forward! Absolutely do not check her back or grab her mouth. This will merely cause more problems. Ride nice and confident but loosely follow her. It's all about the forward motion. Good Luck!

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

This means she has absolutely no respect 4 u. Nip that in the bud now b4 u get hurt.

HTTY & GBTUSA

BUMPER

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

This means she has absolutely no respect 4 u. Nip that in the bud now b4 u get hurt.

HTTY & GBTUSA

BUMPER

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yes, i just got her from some people that let her get away with anything. we've been doing ALOT of groundwork and that has helped so much. what ive been doing is asking her to yield her hind and shoulder from the ground. also whenever she bucks i immediately halt her and make her do turn on the forehands or turn on the hindquarters. so far, she has gotten so much better. in all, ive had her for about a month and when i first got her she would try laying down on top of me when i picked her feet. (haha!! she sure doesnt do that anymore!!!) my advice is just a TON of ground work and dont let her get away with anything that you do. this includes simple things like leading. MAKE her walk right next to you!!! i know this sounds stupid but once i made her respect me in everything she just got so much better.

anyways, im rambling but, i just get so excited when i think about how much better she's getting. good luck with your girly!!

[ 07-14-2006, 10:50 PM: Message edited by: horsey_girl225 ]

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yes, i just got her from some people that let her get away with anything. we've been doing ALOT of groundwork and that has helped so much. what ive been doing is asking her to yield her hind and shoulder from the ground. also whenever she bucks i immediately halt her and make her do turn on the forehands or turn on the hindquarters. so far, she has gotten so much better. in all, ive had her for about a month and when i first got her she would try laying down on top of me when i picked her feet. (haha!! she sure doesnt do that anymore!!!) my advice is just a TON of ground work and dont let her get away with anything that you do. this includes simple things like leading. MAKE her walk right next to you!!! i know this sounds stupid but once i made her respect me in everything she just got so much better.

anyways, im rambling but, i just get so excited when i think about how much better she's getting. good luck with your girly!!

[ 07-14-2006, 10:50 PM: Message edited by: horsey_girl225 ]

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Teach her voice commands on the lunge line and in the round pen. Once she is responding well on the ground, try it in the saddle. Ride her in the round pen and have someone standing in the middle. Have them give the same cue(s) you did to get her to canter, but do NOT do anything in the saddle. Just stay passive and balanced. Once she does canter, give her lots of praise and pats from the saddle. Do this a couple more times until she gets it well, then start adding in your own leg cues at the same time.

Make sure not to over work her in the round pen. Cantering in a small area is hard on a horse, especially one that is young and not well balanced yet.

If you don't have a round pen, try hill work. Teach her the canter voice cues on the lunge line. Once she's doing well, take her on a trail ride. When you see a gentle to moderade hill, send her up. Lean forward appropriately, give her all the rein she wants, and encourage her to get up their fast. Most horses enjoy running up hills and will get the hint quickly [Wink] . Again, don't over work her. Hill work is not easy for a horse, especially one that is young and not well balanced yet.

Good luck!

~Barbara

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Teach her voice commands on the lunge line and in the round pen. Once she is responding well on the ground, try it in the saddle. Ride her in the round pen and have someone standing in the middle. Have them give the same cue(s) you did to get her to canter, but do NOT do anything in the saddle. Just stay passive and balanced. Once she does canter, give her lots of praise and pats from the saddle. Do this a couple more times until she gets it well, then start adding in your own leg cues at the same time.

Make sure not to over work her in the round pen. Cantering in a small area is hard on a horse, especially one that is young and not well balanced yet.

If you don't have a round pen, try hill work. Teach her the canter voice cues on the lunge line. Once she's doing well, take her on a trail ride. When you see a gentle to moderade hill, send her up. Lean forward appropriately, give her all the rein she wants, and encourage her to get up their fast. Most horses enjoy running up hills and will get the hint quickly [Wink] . Again, don't over work her. Hill work is not easy for a horse, especially one that is young and not well balanced yet.

Good luck!

~Barbara

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

If she's rearing, you may have too much pressure on her mouth, or the wrong bit for her. Your saddle could also be causing her pain.

~Barbara

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

If she's rearing, you may have too much pressure on her mouth, or the wrong bit for her. Your saddle could also be causing her pain.

~Barbara

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

i had the same exact problem with MY baby! when she was two, every time i asked her to lope she would rear and/or buck. lol but she grew out of it and she is the best horse in the world now no lie! i show her alot and she places better than 3rd in every class in english pleasure! maybe urs will grow out of it like mine did!

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quote:

Originally posted by horsey_girl225:

WHOA!!! ive been having this EXACT problem with my baby horse... except sometime's she rears too.

i had the same exact problem with MY baby! when she was two, every time i asked her to lope she would rear and/or buck. lol but she grew out of it and she is the best horse in the world now no lie! i show her alot and she places better than 3rd in every class in english pleasure! maybe urs will grow out of it like mine did!

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the bit and saddle all fit her (the bit is the softest i coulde find. it'sne of those watergates which has a lot of breaks, so it is soft) and i dont take her mouth. somedays she has some huge mood swings and somedays im so proud that she is doing so well. it really just depends on how she's feeling which is no excuse but it does play a part in how a ride goes. for the past 4 days she's been awesome!!! thanks for suggesting those thought

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the bit and saddle all fit her (the bit is the softest i coulde find. it'sne of those watergates which has a lot of breaks, so it is soft) and i dont take her mouth. somedays she has some huge mood swings and somedays im so proud that she is doing so well. it really just depends on how she's feeling which is no excuse but it does play a part in how a ride goes. for the past 4 days she's been awesome!!! thanks for suggesting those thought

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I ditto teaching her the command from the ground, etc. etc.

What I urge you to consider, though is if your filly has the balance to carry you safely and comfortably at the canter. What is the terrain like where you are trying to canter her? How big is the space? How balanced is she at the trot - does she use her hindquarters when moving up and down in gait, can she do nice, even circles, does she carry her head normally, or is it up in the air for balance? A lot of people don't realize that young horses have to learn HOW to carry you on their back. They've never done it before; they have no idea how to cart around 100+ extra pounds. Also, do you ask her to canter from a trot, or from a walk?

Many, if not most, of the young horses I've ridden that bucked when asked to canter did so because of balance problems. If your horse was older and more experienced, it might be different, but considering that she's three, there are other factors to take into consideration. Is she physically fit enough to canter with you on her?

The best thing to do is to let them fall into it on their own for the first couple of times. Encourage, but don't force. It may be that she's telling you that she's not sure about it yet. I would give her the benefit of the doubt and work on a nice, strong, BALANCED trot for the next couple of days, before I encouraged her to canter again.

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I ditto teaching her the command from the ground, etc. etc.

What I urge you to consider, though is if your filly has the balance to carry you safely and comfortably at the canter. What is the terrain like where you are trying to canter her? How big is the space? How balanced is she at the trot - does she use her hindquarters when moving up and down in gait, can she do nice, even circles, does she carry her head normally, or is it up in the air for balance? A lot of people don't realize that young horses have to learn HOW to carry you on their back. They've never done it before; they have no idea how to cart around 100+ extra pounds. Also, do you ask her to canter from a trot, or from a walk?

Many, if not most, of the young horses I've ridden that bucked when asked to canter did so because of balance problems. If your horse was older and more experienced, it might be different, but considering that she's three, there are other factors to take into consideration. Is she physically fit enough to canter with you on her?

The best thing to do is to let them fall into it on their own for the first couple of times. Encourage, but don't force. It may be that she's telling you that she's not sure about it yet. I would give her the benefit of the doubt and work on a nice, strong, BALANCED trot for the next couple of days, before I encouraged her to canter again.

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