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lunging help with yearling

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my yearling was lunging fine on the first day, goin away from me and what not. i follow clinton anderson training stuff and i have his handy stick with string. all of a sudden she disrespects the stick and string, and if i hit her just a little bit hard, she ducks her ears back, and rears up and runs at me. [shocked] this is very dangerous, but if i hit her to repremand her, she just comes at me again. im not sure what to do about this without getting hurt. from now on, im gonna teach lunging to weanlings just because they aren't as strong cuz she is a monster for her age! thanx to anyone who helps! [big Grin]

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my yearling was lunging fine on the first day, goin away from me and what not. i follow clinton anderson training stuff and i have his handy stick with string. all of a sudden she disrespects the stick and string, and if i hit her just a little bit hard, she ducks her ears back, and rears up and runs at me. [shocked] this is very dangerous, but if i hit her to repremand her, she just comes at me again. im not sure what to do about this without getting hurt. from now on, im gonna teach lunging to weanlings just because they aren't as strong cuz she is a monster for her age! thanx to anyone who helps! [big Grin]

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You didn't mention your level of experience or how your horse usually behaves.(If your horse is always disrespectful and you let her get away w/it, why should anyone help you w/this? She'll just kill you some other way. [big Grin] )

Try to desensitize her to the stick and string. You can use CA's methods or someone else's. If she will let you hit her then w/o a problem, but gets p!ssy when you lunge her, read on.

If you have access to a roundpen, put her in it and ask her to go. If she doesn't go, hit the ground. If she still doesn't go, hit her-HARD!!! Since you know she is going to rear/run at you/whatever, BE PREPARED!!! Carry a dressage whip or something like that(it seems like the stick and string wouldn't be easy to aim with, but if it works for you-go for it) to hit her with whenever she comes at you.Keep hitting her 'til she backs off. Then give her a break for a minute. Repeat 'til you can hit her(to make her go faster) w/o her doing anything dangerous.

May sound cruel, but a dominant horse-you-doesn't *or at least SHOULDN'T*just back off when a lower horse-your yearling-comes at them, they fight back. ***If you are worried about hurting your horse, just keep in mind that horses play with other 1,000# STRONG-way stronger than you-horses that kick them. There is no way you can do as much damage to your horse as a real horse can.

OP, if you don't feel confident enough to handle your horse, invest in your safety and pay a pro to do the job. BTW, when you teach her how to lunge, don't do very much at a time b/c she's still growing. Have you tried searching to see if anyone else posted a question about this? Maybe you should also look into other trainer/clinician's methods. (Some horses need a different program than others.)

If you have a problem w/this method instead of wasting your time flaming me about it, you can read,post, and/or try something else. [big Grin]

Hope this helps. If you don't understand anything, just PM me.

[smiley Wavey]

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You didn't mention your level of experience or how your horse usually behaves.(If your horse is always disrespectful and you let her get away w/it, why should anyone help you w/this? She'll just kill you some other way. [big Grin] )

Try to desensitize her to the stick and string. You can use CA's methods or someone else's. If she will let you hit her then w/o a problem, but gets p!ssy when you lunge her, read on.

If you have access to a roundpen, put her in it and ask her to go. If she doesn't go, hit the ground. If she still doesn't go, hit her-HARD!!! Since you know she is going to rear/run at you/whatever, BE PREPARED!!! Carry a dressage whip or something like that(it seems like the stick and string wouldn't be easy to aim with, but if it works for you-go for it) to hit her with whenever she comes at you.Keep hitting her 'til she backs off. Then give her a break for a minute. Repeat 'til you can hit her(to make her go faster) w/o her doing anything dangerous.

May sound cruel, but a dominant horse-you-doesn't *or at least SHOULDN'T*just back off when a lower horse-your yearling-comes at them, they fight back. ***If you are worried about hurting your horse, just keep in mind that horses play with other 1,000# STRONG-way stronger than you-horses that kick them. There is no way you can do as much damage to your horse as a real horse can.

OP, if you don't feel confident enough to handle your horse, invest in your safety and pay a pro to do the job. BTW, when you teach her how to lunge, don't do very much at a time b/c she's still growing. Have you tried searching to see if anyone else posted a question about this? Maybe you should also look into other trainer/clinician's methods. (Some horses need a different program than others.)

If you have a problem w/this method instead of wasting your time flaming me about it, you can read,post, and/or try something else. [big Grin]

Hope this helps. If you don't understand anything, just PM me.

[smiley Wavey]

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whilst disrespect MUST be dealt with, lunging a yearling is very detrimental to its joints - the torque exerted by turns and circles is too much.

please reconsider your regime. Once a week for 5 minutes is fine, but no more, and certainly no cantering. Instead work in hand on disengaging hindquarters, moving away from pressure, leading, loading, tying, bathing, de-sppoking etc. keep the sessions short 10 minutes or so....

the disrespect may very well stem from the fact that you are pushing her too far too fast... and if you continue to do so, you will make her mean, really mean, and believe me, that's really hard to deal with - I cannot tell you from here if you are right to hit her - what I can say, is try stopping work for at least two weeks and re-evaluate the situation. Come up with a game plan and then apply it - don't get mad, and be prepared for the best. NEVER ask a horse to do more than it can do. She may not be MENTALLY able to do more than two laps... and that's fine.

You are at a very critical stage with this horse, and you MUST get it right. If you don't - you WILL have created a monster - if you need professional help...get it. It is way better to eat an ounce of humble pie now than mouthfulls of dirt later

And please be safe.

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whilst disrespect MUST be dealt with, lunging a yearling is very detrimental to its joints - the torque exerted by turns and circles is too much.

please reconsider your regime. Once a week for 5 minutes is fine, but no more, and certainly no cantering. Instead work in hand on disengaging hindquarters, moving away from pressure, leading, loading, tying, bathing, de-sppoking etc. keep the sessions short 10 minutes or so....

the disrespect may very well stem from the fact that you are pushing her too far too fast... and if you continue to do so, you will make her mean, really mean, and believe me, that's really hard to deal with - I cannot tell you from here if you are right to hit her - what I can say, is try stopping work for at least two weeks and re-evaluate the situation. Come up with a game plan and then apply it - don't get mad, and be prepared for the best. NEVER ask a horse to do more than it can do. She may not be MENTALLY able to do more than two laps... and that's fine.

You are at a very critical stage with this horse, and you MUST get it right. If you don't - you WILL have created a monster - if you need professional help...get it. It is way better to eat an ounce of humble pie now than mouthfulls of dirt later

And please be safe.

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yeah i have a trainer and next time she can come out i'm going to have her help me. and leoned, once a week for 5 minutes wont teach her anything, she will just forget it and never get better. i dont run her too much, i just want her to go faster than a walk! and i use SMB II's on her so its better for her legs.

Rojo- she used to be like this when she was younger, like when i was leading her she would strike, but now she does everything, she just started this stuff again. i DO desensitize with the stick and string, and shes perfectly fine with it. i can twirl it in circles next to her and above her head like a helicopter. its just when i ask her to go faster then a walk that she does this. i have a lot of expierience with horses and last year when my filly was two, when she got home from training, she was VERY ill behaved. it was like no one had ever been on her. i am the one who trained her OUT OF her rearing habit, and bucking habit, and breaking gait habit, and now she is the best behaved horse i own!

and i forgot to mention that she round pens like a wonderful little horse! no bucks, no running at me, nothing. she walks, trots canters, does inside turns, and everything. its only when shes on the lunge line.

[ 07-13-2006, 08:00 PM: Message edited by: LuV mY hOrSeYs ]

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yeah i have a trainer and next time she can come out i'm going to have her help me. and leoned, once a week for 5 minutes wont teach her anything, she will just forget it and never get better. i dont run her too much, i just want her to go faster than a walk! and i use SMB II's on her so its better for her legs.

Rojo- she used to be like this when she was younger, like when i was leading her she would strike, but now she does everything, she just started this stuff again. i DO desensitize with the stick and string, and shes perfectly fine with it. i can twirl it in circles next to her and above her head like a helicopter. its just when i ask her to go faster then a walk that she does this. i have a lot of expierience with horses and last year when my filly was two, when she got home from training, she was VERY ill behaved. it was like no one had ever been on her. i am the one who trained her OUT OF her rearing habit, and bucking habit, and breaking gait habit, and now she is the best behaved horse i own!

and i forgot to mention that she round pens like a wonderful little horse! no bucks, no running at me, nothing. she walks, trots canters, does inside turns, and everything. its only when shes on the lunge line.

[ 07-13-2006, 08:00 PM: Message edited by: LuV mY hOrSeYs ]

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quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

and leoned, once a week for 5 minutes wont teach her anything, she will just forget it and never get better.

You really can teach her to do things w/out lunging her, and without hurting her legs. Work on respecting your space, etc. You don't need to lunge to do that.

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quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

and leoned, once a week for 5 minutes wont teach her anything, she will just forget it and never get better.

You really can teach her to do things w/out lunging her, and without hurting her legs. Work on respecting your space, etc. You don't need to lunge to do that.

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put her in a large pen with a horse that is very aware of it's manners and GITS when you say so [Wink]

They are herd animals. My yearling (now 16hh 2yo) used to do this. Was the reason he was gelded.

First of all, when it happened with my guy, I was holding an 8-foot lunge whip. So he got the crap beat out of him until he exited my space, and he was after me like a stinking tiger. So, like a baseball bat, within two very short seconds after getting slammed in the head and nuts(when he turned his rear), he left and was galloping away. I chased him until his eyes softened and he quit his tantrum. Then stopped. Called him over and brushed him.

After that, I threw him in with a viscious ex-stud pony who beat the crap out of him for looking at anything the wrong way. And I started lunging him in there with the pony(who is an amazingly tuned little creature- loves to obey commands). Within a few months I had a perfectly trained horse who figured there was a reason his little stuck-up lord and master of the universe was RUNNING FROM ME [Crazy]

He only tried it 2 more times after that. And always veered out of striking distance. Now he lunges like a pro, no aggression.

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

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put her in a large pen with a horse that is very aware of it's manners and GITS when you say so [Wink]

They are herd animals. My yearling (now 16hh 2yo) used to do this. Was the reason he was gelded.

First of all, when it happened with my guy, I was holding an 8-foot lunge whip. So he got the crap beat out of him until he exited my space, and he was after me like a stinking tiger. So, like a baseball bat, within two very short seconds after getting slammed in the head and nuts(when he turned his rear), he left and was galloping away. I chased him until his eyes softened and he quit his tantrum. Then stopped. Called him over and brushed him.

After that, I threw him in with a viscious ex-stud pony who beat the crap out of him for looking at anything the wrong way. And I started lunging him in there with the pony(who is an amazingly tuned little creature- loves to obey commands). Within a few months I had a perfectly trained horse who figured there was a reason his little stuck-up lord and master of the universe was RUNNING FROM ME [Crazy]

He only tried it 2 more times after that. And always veered out of striking distance. Now he lunges like a pro, no aggression.

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

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quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

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quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

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Hey...gotta ditto Leoned here. Forget the lunge line stuff for awhile. Putting them on a circle like that at such a young age is really hard on their joints.

I've known quite a few trainers whose horses always won lunge line class, then the 2 YO futurities, then the 3YO futurities.

But by 5? All of those horses needed hock injections, most were getting arthritic, and I've yet to see one move soundly past the age of 10.

Handling, hand walking, brushing, etc is great! But babies need to be babies!

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Hey...gotta ditto Leoned here. Forget the lunge line stuff for awhile. Putting them on a circle like that at such a young age is really hard on their joints.

I've known quite a few trainers whose horses always won lunge line class, then the 2 YO futurities, then the 3YO futurities.

But by 5? All of those horses needed hock injections, most were getting arthritic, and I've yet to see one move soundly past the age of 10.

Handling, hand walking, brushing, etc is great! But babies need to be babies!

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quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

ok. With her behavior I'm gonna hazard a guess that she's dominant between the two. Find a meaner horse to put her in with. The very worst thing you can do to a young horse is put them by themselves... They are still learning herd manners and how to be a horse. Mentally she needs a herd around her.

I would say get her to do it right once and then leave it at that. You don't want to injure her [smiley Wavey]

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quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

ok. With her behavior I'm gonna hazard a guess that she's dominant between the two. Find a meaner horse to put her in with. The very worst thing you can do to a young horse is put them by themselves... They are still learning herd manners and how to be a horse. Mentally she needs a herd around her.

I would say get her to do it right once and then leave it at that. You don't want to injure her [smiley Wavey]

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There are lots of things you can do with her right now.

Ground drive from behind.

Walk next to her over ground poles or make a bridge out of plywood and walk her over that. Then trot her over the ground poles.

Teach her to back thru an "L". Trot with her around two barrels in a figure 8 pattern.

Teach her to walk over a tarp. Teach her to back or turn each direction(Giving to pressure)

Get a couple big tires and teach her to put her feet in them.

Teach her to come to you when you call her. I take a treat and walk backwards while holding it out and call them to me as I'm moving backwards.

Put a bare back pad on her and let her walk around with it while you watch. I put my surcigle on our two year old to get her used to being cinched up.

Get her used to spay bottles, clippers. Touching the inside of her ears.

Use a hose and get her used to being sprayed with water from the feet up. (while in a controlled enviroment)

See, lots of things to do without trying to lunge right now. If I tried I could probably come up with a few more.

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There are lots of things you can do with her right now.

Ground drive from behind.

Walk next to her over ground poles or make a bridge out of plywood and walk her over that. Then trot her over the ground poles.

Teach her to back thru an "L". Trot with her around two barrels in a figure 8 pattern.

Teach her to walk over a tarp. Teach her to back or turn each direction(Giving to pressure)

Get a couple big tires and teach her to put her feet in them.

Teach her to come to you when you call her. I take a treat and walk backwards while holding it out and call them to me as I'm moving backwards.

Put a bare back pad on her and let her walk around with it while you watch. I put my surcigle on our two year old to get her used to being cinched up.

Get her used to spay bottles, clippers. Touching the inside of her ears.

Use a hose and get her used to being sprayed with water from the feet up. (while in a controlled enviroment)

See, lots of things to do without trying to lunge right now. If I tried I could probably come up with a few more.

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quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

ok. With her behavior I'm gonna hazard a guess that she's dominant between the two. Find a meaner horse to put her in with. The very worst thing you can do to a young horse is put them by themselves... They are still learning herd manners and how to be a horse. Mentally she needs a herd around her.

I would say get her to do it right once and then leave it at that. You don't want to injure her
[smiley Wavey]
no she's not the dominant. misty pushes her around and bites her and kicks her and trixie stays away from her.

[ 07-15-2006, 01:51 PM: Message edited by: LuV mY hOrSeYs ]

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quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

quote:

Originally posted by LuV mY hOrSeYs:

quote:

Originally posted by dodgershuman:

Is she in with other horses? how much turnout does she get?

yea our horses can go into the barn if they please, and go out because it used to be a cow barn, so the stalls each have a paddock. u can also take gates outta the middle so it is a double stall, triple, etc. she is usually by herself and the others are next to her or whatever, but right now she is in a paddock with misty. it is a double stall and they are together.

ok. With her behavior I'm gonna hazard a guess that she's dominant between the two. Find a meaner horse to put her in with. The very worst thing you can do to a young horse is put them by themselves... They are still learning herd manners and how to be a horse. Mentally she needs a herd around her.

I would say get her to do it right once and then leave it at that. You don't want to injure her
[smiley Wavey]
no she's not the dominant. misty pushes her around and bites her and kicks her and trixie stays away from her.

[ 07-15-2006, 01:51 PM: Message edited by: LuV mY hOrSeYs ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Dragon:

There are lots of things you can do with her right now.

Ground drive from behind.

Walk next to her over ground poles or make a bridge out of plywood and walk her over that. Then trot her over the ground poles.

Teach her to back thru an "L". Trot with her around two barrels in a figure 8 pattern.

Teach her to walk over a tarp. Teach her to back or turn each direction(Giving to pressure)

Get a couple big tires and teach her to put her feet in them.

Teach her to come to you when you call her. I take a treat and walk backwards while holding it out and call them to me as I'm moving backwards.

Put a bare back pad on her and let her walk around with it while you watch. I put my surcigle on our two year old to get her used to being cinched up.

Get her used to spay bottles, clippers. Touching the inside of her ears.

Use a hose and get her used to being sprayed with water from the feet up. (while in a controlled enviroment)

See, lots of things to do without trying to lunge right now. If I tried I could probably come up with a few more.

lol i already do all this stuff. she has been shown so her ears have been clipped, she doesnt care about the tarp, i can fly spray her, hose her, tie her, she walks right over the bridge we have and over the ground poles, we dont have a bareback pad though and i dont think my grama wants to get one cuz i wouldnt really use it, and i round pen her and shes fine, and she comes when i say whoa and back away. see? i do my homework, she just doesnt lunge on a line.

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quote:

Originally posted by Dragon:

There are lots of things you can do with her right now.

Ground drive from behind.

Walk next to her over ground poles or make a bridge out of plywood and walk her over that. Then trot her over the ground poles.

Teach her to back thru an "L". Trot with her around two barrels in a figure 8 pattern.

Teach her to walk over a tarp. Teach her to back or turn each direction(Giving to pressure)

Get a couple big tires and teach her to put her feet in them.

Teach her to come to you when you call her. I take a treat and walk backwards while holding it out and call them to me as I'm moving backwards.

Put a bare back pad on her and let her walk around with it while you watch. I put my surcigle on our two year old to get her used to being cinched up.

Get her used to spay bottles, clippers. Touching the inside of her ears.

Use a hose and get her used to being sprayed with water from the feet up. (while in a controlled enviroment)

See, lots of things to do without trying to lunge right now. If I tried I could probably come up with a few more.

lol i already do all this stuff. she has been shown so her ears have been clipped, she doesnt care about the tarp, i can fly spray her, hose her, tie her, she walks right over the bridge we have and over the ground poles, we dont have a bareback pad though and i dont think my grama wants to get one cuz i wouldnt really use it, and i round pen her and shes fine, and she comes when i say whoa and back away. see? i do my homework, she just doesnt lunge on a line.

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Give your horse more credit. She can and WILL learn from 5 mins once a week. But the thing with babies, is you can make a sour horse from working babies too much. THis is the time to just let her be a baby, bring her in daily and brush her, do a little something with her occasionally, but jsut let her be and grow for now. She will thank you for it in years to come.

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Give your horse more credit. She can and WILL learn from 5 mins once a week. But the thing with babies, is you can make a sour horse from working babies too much. THis is the time to just let her be a baby, bring her in daily and brush her, do a little something with her occasionally, but jsut let her be and grow for now. She will thank you for it in years to come.

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You're being extremely rude about the excellent advice offered to you.

Your horse is not ready to be seriously longed.

She is giving you loud, obvious signs. You are getting a lot of sound advice. Apparently, you're power-tripped to the point where you want her to longe no matter how detrimental to her it may be. Once a week for five minutes is perfectly fine. Even older horses don't enjoy being longed every day. Going around in circles is boring.

I'm sure, if you are creative enough, you can come up with LOTS of things to teach her to fill in the space until she's physically and mentally ready to do as you ask. You can teach her to do tricks that will mentally stimulate her and any number of things that will come in handy later on. Get a garbage bag full of empty, rattling soda cans and let her be all right with it dragging behind you. Let her stand there while you slam pots and pans around and braid long, shiny, spooky ribbons into her mane. Spend down time with her. Why longe when there's so much else you can do without the harmful effects afterward?

I might be speaking to deaf ears, but I felt I had to give it a shot.

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You're being extremely rude about the excellent advice offered to you.

Your horse is not ready to be seriously longed.

She is giving you loud, obvious signs. You are getting a lot of sound advice. Apparently, you're power-tripped to the point where you want her to longe no matter how detrimental to her it may be. Once a week for five minutes is perfectly fine. Even older horses don't enjoy being longed every day. Going around in circles is boring.

I'm sure, if you are creative enough, you can come up with LOTS of things to teach her to fill in the space until she's physically and mentally ready to do as you ask. You can teach her to do tricks that will mentally stimulate her and any number of things that will come in handy later on. Get a garbage bag full of empty, rattling soda cans and let her be all right with it dragging behind you. Let her stand there while you slam pots and pans around and braid long, shiny, spooky ribbons into her mane. Spend down time with her. Why longe when there's so much else you can do without the harmful effects afterward?

I might be speaking to deaf ears, but I felt I had to give it a shot.

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I agree with Talking to horses. as a yearling it is too young to longe a horse. the only reason you would lunge a yearling is if it was a colt that was just gelded. other than that you let them grow. splints/leg wraps wont help either. they dont support the leg when it hits the ground when they're going in circles.

Some of those professional trainers have really bad methods. You should try using a regular whip, not the string on a stick. Our trainer knew horses trained with the parelli method and those were absolutly vicious. i havent seen much of CA, but if his methods even somewhat resemple parelli then that could be your problem.

Again, most horses arent mentally ready to belunged until they're 2 or sometimes older. it all depends on the horse. Also, do you lunge her in a sand or dirt arena? it would be very bad if shes on hard ground.

Dont even think of lunging weanlings. that is WAY too young. if you do that you will risk damaging them.

Im sure you've been getting this a lot but you need to spend A LOT of time grooming, leading, etc. you can work on your showmanship if you want. Teach her to stand square, if you havent already, and to trot when you ask her.

A big thing you could teach her is space. she needs to learn to respect your space and only be in your face if you ask. get her to turn away from you easily and to back off, using a signal like putting your hand up or saying back off or back, etc. teach her to come up to you to a certain point and to ALWAYS respect where YOU are. most young horses arent good at minding space because they dont know NOT to go after you.

If you want to keep lunging her every time she attacks you like that HIT her HARD with the stick part or the handle of the whip. hit her on her neck/shoulder area....even her head if you have to. Dont worry about hurting her ive seen an adult horse body slam a yearling with his shoulder when the yearling got too bossy.

To get her to learn you are boss you can try grabbing the crest area of her neck and holding onto it hard so you are 'biting' her. older horses will do this to teach young horses to behave. If shes biting at you you can pinch her cheek near her mouth or hold the skin on the side of her neck between your fingers and thumb and twist your hand in towards her neck. She'll move her neck away from you and that is what you want. These are alternatives to hitting a biter or aggressive horse if you dont want to potentially make her head shy. You can only do this when your leading her or when shes not lunging. Otherwise you NEED to hit her HARD.

I hope you actually think about this and everyone else's replies. YOU asked for help and we're giving it to you.

[ 07-17-2006, 11:27 AM: Message edited by: Bindi ]

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I agree with Talking to horses. as a yearling it is too young to longe a horse. the only reason you would lunge a yearling is if it was a colt that was just gelded. other than that you let them grow. splints/leg wraps wont help either. they dont support the leg when it hits the ground when they're going in circles.

Some of those professional trainers have really bad methods. You should try using a regular whip, not the string on a stick. Our trainer knew horses trained with the parelli method and those were absolutly vicious. i havent seen much of CA, but if his methods even somewhat resemple parelli then that could be your problem.

Again, most horses arent mentally ready to belunged until they're 2 or sometimes older. it all depends on the horse. Also, do you lunge her in a sand or dirt arena? it would be very bad if shes on hard ground.

Dont even think of lunging weanlings. that is WAY too young. if you do that you will risk damaging them.

Im sure you've been getting this a lot but you need to spend A LOT of time grooming, leading, etc. you can work on your showmanship if you want. Teach her to stand square, if you havent already, and to trot when you ask her.

A big thing you could teach her is space. she needs to learn to respect your space and only be in your face if you ask. get her to turn away from you easily and to back off, using a signal like putting your hand up or saying back off or back, etc. teach her to come up to you to a certain point and to ALWAYS respect where YOU are. most young horses arent good at minding space because they dont know NOT to go after you.

If you want to keep lunging her every time she attacks you like that HIT her HARD with the stick part or the handle of the whip. hit her on her neck/shoulder area....even her head if you have to. Dont worry about hurting her ive seen an adult horse body slam a yearling with his shoulder when the yearling got too bossy.

To get her to learn you are boss you can try grabbing the crest area of her neck and holding onto it hard so you are 'biting' her. older horses will do this to teach young horses to behave. If shes biting at you you can pinch her cheek near her mouth or hold the skin on the side of her neck between your fingers and thumb and twist your hand in towards her neck. She'll move her neck away from you and that is what you want. These are alternatives to hitting a biter or aggressive horse if you dont want to potentially make her head shy. You can only do this when your leading her or when shes not lunging. Otherwise you NEED to hit her HARD.

I hope you actually think about this and everyone else's replies. YOU asked for help and we're giving it to you.

[ 07-17-2006, 11:27 AM: Message edited by: Bindi ]

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