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im having problems with my arabian

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Hey there im having problems with a araibian horse that i bought at a auction and he is 10 years old i have had him for about three weeks and when we brought him over he was realy nice you could ride him any where and evrywher and he was fun to ride but now he has been geting to be realy bad. You can get on him but he wont go any were dosent moves and when i side kick him he begans to move backwards but never forward so then i decide to se what was his reaction when i tap him with a stik on his back and he just began to kick and now when you touch him with the stik any where on his body when you are riding him he jumps and kicks and i realy dont know what can i do to fix this horse.... i will love and apresiate if yall can give me som tips thanks alot.

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Hey there im having problems with a araibian horse that i bought at a auction and he is 10 years old i have had him for about three weeks and when we brought him over he was realy nice you could ride him any where and evrywher and he was fun to ride but now he has been geting to be realy bad. You can get on him but he wont go any were dosent moves and when i side kick him he begans to move backwards but never forward so then i decide to se what was his reaction when i tap him with a stik on his back and he just began to kick and now when you touch him with the stik any where on his body when you are riding him he jumps and kicks and i realy dont know what can i do to fix this horse.... i will love and apresiate if yall can give me som tips thanks alot.

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I suppose he had been spoiled at some time in his life. He was barn sour and 'stalled out'. Then someone came along that was a pretty good hand and straightened him out. They gave him a good spanking or two and he rode like he was supposed to.

Then you came along, and Arabians, being as smart as they are, it did not take very long for him to figure out the rules had changed. You were not the hand that guy was that straightened him out and he went right back to being spoiled.

The first time it took him a while to get spoiled. The second time, all it took was one hesitation that you did not quickly correct, and it was deje vu.

A good rider can put anything in a horse's head, but NO ONE is good enough to take anything out.

[ 07-29-2006, 07:50 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I suppose he had been spoiled at some time in his life. He was barn sour and 'stalled out'. Then someone came along that was a pretty good hand and straightened him out. They gave him a good spanking or two and he rode like he was supposed to.

Then you came along, and Arabians, being as smart as they are, it did not take very long for him to figure out the rules had changed. You were not the hand that guy was that straightened him out and he went right back to being spoiled.

The first time it took him a while to get spoiled. The second time, all it took was one hesitation that you did not quickly correct, and it was deje vu.

A good rider can put anything in a horse's head, but NO ONE is good enough to take anything out.

[ 07-29-2006, 07:50 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I am not saying all auctions. But I have heard other people buy horses from auctions and they were calm as a kitten. Then in a few days to weeks of having them home they would become the horse from he**. Later on to find out that the horses were drugged to stay calm during an auction only so the people could sell the horse to some gullible person. This might not be problem in your case. But just a heads up on what could happen at purchasing a horse from an auction. I hope that is not the problem and good luck with your new horse.

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I am not saying all auctions. But I have heard other people buy horses from auctions and they were calm as a kitten. Then in a few days to weeks of having them home they would become the horse from he**. Later on to find out that the horses were drugged to stay calm during an auction only so the people could sell the horse to some gullible person. This might not be problem in your case. But just a heads up on what could happen at purchasing a horse from an auction. I hope that is not the problem and good luck with your new horse.

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No Offense but I dont think that these are the horses problems, they sound like they may be stemming from the rider.

1. common sense and proper ridding skills say you should not just get on a horse and kick it, just becuase it wont go. You wouldn't like it very much if someone did that to you. It sounds like this horse was confused with your aids, and you have to give him credit for at least responding to you. i.e bakcing up

2. Im not sure how hard your hitting him with the "stick", but ti may be why he jumps and kicks out. If it just a light reminder tap, he may need to be desensitized to it. (PM me for how to do this)

3. I agree with Cheri, this horse is probly a smart horse and realizes that he can take advantage of you.

He started out to be a "good" horse when you bought him, so I would evaluate the tequniques you are using. I dont like when horses are labled as "bad" just becuase the rider is unsure about how to handle a situation.

[ 07-29-2006, 08:36 AM: Message edited by: twohottblueshoes ]

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No Offense but I dont think that these are the horses problems, they sound like they may be stemming from the rider.

1. common sense and proper ridding skills say you should not just get on a horse and kick it, just becuase it wont go. You wouldn't like it very much if someone did that to you. It sounds like this horse was confused with your aids, and you have to give him credit for at least responding to you. i.e bakcing up

2. Im not sure how hard your hitting him with the "stick", but ti may be why he jumps and kicks out. If it just a light reminder tap, he may need to be desensitized to it. (PM me for how to do this)

3. I agree with Cheri, this horse is probly a smart horse and realizes that he can take advantage of you.

He started out to be a "good" horse when you bought him, so I would evaluate the tequniques you are using. I dont like when horses are labled as "bad" just becuase the rider is unsure about how to handle a situation.

[ 07-29-2006, 08:36 AM: Message edited by: twohottblueshoes ]

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First, Cheri has a decent handle on the possible cause.

Now, you say you bought your horse at auction and you say he's an Arab. So, for example at the Hermiston auction and at others, like the Corona auction, you often get the opportunity to talk with the prior owner or you might have his registration papers. Or maybe you don't, you don't give us that information.

The reason I mention this is that you also don't give any information as to whether you know what his lifestyle or training has been to this point. If you don't and you can trace his previous owner(s), breeder and/or trainer(s), do that now. For all you know, you could be speaking Chinese to a Greek horse.

That's how we got our Morgan gelding for so little ($800). None of his 3 previous owners bothered to transfer his registration or investigate his training and performance background. He'd been labeled mean, vicious and unrideable.

It turned out that these people were, in fact, speaking Western to a Harness and Park Saddle trained horse. "What is this laying the rein alongside my neck, you're doing? You don't know how to ride!" is probably what he was thinking and he took advantage of it.

If you cannot trace his background, take him to a trustworthy trainer who has experience in all disciplines to find out just what your horse is capable.

Just remember, Arabs are very smart and get bored very easily. They will play games with you. Don't let them get away with things that are not respectful, but expect that they will test you continuously. That's all part of the challenge of being family with an Arab.

Good luck with him.

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First, Cheri has a decent handle on the possible cause.

Now, you say you bought your horse at auction and you say he's an Arab. So, for example at the Hermiston auction and at others, like the Corona auction, you often get the opportunity to talk with the prior owner or you might have his registration papers. Or maybe you don't, you don't give us that information.

The reason I mention this is that you also don't give any information as to whether you know what his lifestyle or training has been to this point. If you don't and you can trace his previous owner(s), breeder and/or trainer(s), do that now. For all you know, you could be speaking Chinese to a Greek horse.

That's how we got our Morgan gelding for so little ($800). None of his 3 previous owners bothered to transfer his registration or investigate his training and performance background. He'd been labeled mean, vicious and unrideable.

It turned out that these people were, in fact, speaking Western to a Harness and Park Saddle trained horse. "What is this laying the rein alongside my neck, you're doing? You don't know how to ride!" is probably what he was thinking and he took advantage of it.

If you cannot trace his background, take him to a trustworthy trainer who has experience in all disciplines to find out just what your horse is capable.

Just remember, Arabs are very smart and get bored very easily. They will play games with you. Don't let them get away with things that are not respectful, but expect that they will test you continuously. That's all part of the challenge of being family with an Arab.

Good luck with him.

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Wow. deja-vu. I had the exact same thing happen with BOTH of my horses. Except I bought them from a ranch that I rode at. It got to the point where I really just couldn't control them at the walk and sometimes on the ground! So we gave in and called a trainer at the ranch to come help us out. she's been coming to my house once a week for about 3 or 4 months now and the horses are doing great.

But one thing you might want to think about is starting on the ground. Get your horses attention. If he won't listen under saddle, lower the peg. Start with groundwork. Do anything you can imagine, like sidepassing, just plain walking, halting, backing up, just anything. Get him used to paying attention to you. And you can make it fun, too. Practice having him give you his head.If you're standing on the near side(left side),put your right hand on the poll in a cupped shape, and your left hand on his nose(about where the noseband or halter would be) and stand at his shoulder. Pull his head toward you and make him hold it straight vertically(up and down)for like 3 seconds. When he behaves and doesn't jerk around, eventually work your way up to 10 seconds.(or more)

And there are plenty of other things that I learned from this trainer, but I don't think anyone wants me clogging up this board, so you can pm me if you want some more.

Also, is this your first horse? Maybe an arabian wasn't a very good choice. I mean, I don't know your riding level, you may even be better than me. But usually the first horse should be old,calm, and very well trained. Perhaps even a push button horse, and an auction is not a very safe place to buy a horse, cuz you never know what you're getting. Sorry for preaching, but that's just what I've been taught.

Another tip:(sorry, I couldn't resist) When you're riding and your horse absolutely WILL NOT move, make him move in a circle. It's harder for him to go in a tight circle so it's a form of punishment. Like:"OK, you don't want to go forward, then let's go in a circle." You can't let him get away with resisting your will!Pull one rein back towards you and use your inside leg to cue him to bend with the pressure. Once you do a circle, try to walk forward again. Another thing, if he backs up, cue him to back up. Make it YOUR idea to do it, not his. Because HE is taking control of YOU and that could grow to be a very serious problem. Back up until you feel you should stop(even if it's all the way across the arena) then stop. He stops, tell him to go forward, if he doesn't, repeat the process.

Arabians are very smart horses and will test you constantly, they will also learn quickly. So I hope that what I've said has made sense and hopefully helped if you try it. If you need more, PM me. Good luck [smiley Wavey]

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Wow. deja-vu. I had the exact same thing happen with BOTH of my horses. Except I bought them from a ranch that I rode at. It got to the point where I really just couldn't control them at the walk and sometimes on the ground! So we gave in and called a trainer at the ranch to come help us out. she's been coming to my house once a week for about 3 or 4 months now and the horses are doing great.

But one thing you might want to think about is starting on the ground. Get your horses attention. If he won't listen under saddle, lower the peg. Start with groundwork. Do anything you can imagine, like sidepassing, just plain walking, halting, backing up, just anything. Get him used to paying attention to you. And you can make it fun, too. Practice having him give you his head.If you're standing on the near side(left side),put your right hand on the poll in a cupped shape, and your left hand on his nose(about where the noseband or halter would be) and stand at his shoulder. Pull his head toward you and make him hold it straight vertically(up and down)for like 3 seconds. When he behaves and doesn't jerk around, eventually work your way up to 10 seconds.(or more)

And there are plenty of other things that I learned from this trainer, but I don't think anyone wants me clogging up this board, so you can pm me if you want some more.

Also, is this your first horse? Maybe an arabian wasn't a very good choice. I mean, I don't know your riding level, you may even be better than me. But usually the first horse should be old,calm, and very well trained. Perhaps even a push button horse, and an auction is not a very safe place to buy a horse, cuz you never know what you're getting. Sorry for preaching, but that's just what I've been taught.

Another tip:(sorry, I couldn't resist) When you're riding and your horse absolutely WILL NOT move, make him move in a circle. It's harder for him to go in a tight circle so it's a form of punishment. Like:"OK, you don't want to go forward, then let's go in a circle." You can't let him get away with resisting your will!Pull one rein back towards you and use your inside leg to cue him to bend with the pressure. Once you do a circle, try to walk forward again. Another thing, if he backs up, cue him to back up. Make it YOUR idea to do it, not his. Because HE is taking control of YOU and that could grow to be a very serious problem. Back up until you feel you should stop(even if it's all the way across the arena) then stop. He stops, tell him to go forward, if he doesn't, repeat the process.

Arabians are very smart horses and will test you constantly, they will also learn quickly. So I hope that what I've said has made sense and hopefully helped if you try it. If you need more, PM me. Good luck [smiley Wavey]

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Seems like every horse I've ever owned started this stuff at about 3 weeks. It's the rule of three's. He's pushing you to see what he can get away with.

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Seems like every horse I've ever owned started this stuff at about 3 weeks. It's the rule of three's. He's pushing you to see what he can get away with.

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I would get your vet and/or an equine chiropractor out to rule out pain in his back and mouth. Also have them check your saddle fit.

What kind of bit are you using on him? I would make sure he's in a simple snaffle (no shanks) or a side pull (no bit).

If pain isn't the issue, your saddle fits well, and you're riding him in an acceptable bit, then he needs more training. Work with him in the round pen and/or on the lunge line. Teach him voice commands for all gaits. Work on dominance with him and respect. Once you have him working well on the ground, then get back on. Use your voice commands for forward.

I would also HIGHLY recommend seeking some help from a professional trainer. Have the trainer give you lessons and help you work with the horse.

~Barbara

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I would get your vet and/or an equine chiropractor out to rule out pain in his back and mouth. Also have them check your saddle fit.

What kind of bit are you using on him? I would make sure he's in a simple snaffle (no shanks) or a side pull (no bit).

If pain isn't the issue, your saddle fits well, and you're riding him in an acceptable bit, then he needs more training. Work with him in the round pen and/or on the lunge line. Teach him voice commands for all gaits. Work on dominance with him and respect. Once you have him working well on the ground, then get back on. Use your voice commands for forward.

I would also HIGHLY recommend seeking some help from a professional trainer. Have the trainer give you lessons and help you work with the horse.

~Barbara

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