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phillip

From one place to another

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Has anyone ever bought/sold/trained a horse that acted one way at one place and when moved to new home/place the horse acted like you carried the wrong one?

I have noticed this twice in the past two weeks.

This subject can be broad so.....

I believe for the most part horses that are in a run-in/open barn set up and moved into a stalled/boarding set up that they will need time to adjust from freedom being taken away along with all the new smells and sounds of the new place.

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Has anyone ever bought/sold/trained a horse that acted one way at one place and when moved to new home/place the horse acted like you carried the wrong one?

I have noticed this twice in the past two weeks.

This subject can be broad so.....

I believe for the most part horses that are in a run-in/open barn set up and moved into a stalled/boarding set up that they will need time to adjust from freedom being taken away along with all the new smells and sounds of the new place.

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I've also experienced the exact opposite. Both of my geldings were started as cutters, and even though they had been away from that exact environment for years, when I took them to a place that had been set up for cutting, they just fell back into their old routine.

I know when I move to TN that they will both feel "at home" since I'll be keeping them at a cutting facility until I buy a place of my own.

As for the stall vs. run in situation, that makes a tremendous difference. I honestly don't know if my horses could handle being in stalls since they have been used to freedom for the past 6 years. As 2 yr. olds they were in stalls, then I had 12x24 pipe corrals with shelters, then from 2000 to present they've been in much larger areas.

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I've also experienced the exact opposite. Both of my geldings were started as cutters, and even though they had been away from that exact environment for years, when I took them to a place that had been set up for cutting, they just fell back into their old routine.

I know when I move to TN that they will both feel "at home" since I'll be keeping them at a cutting facility until I buy a place of my own.

As for the stall vs. run in situation, that makes a tremendous difference. I honestly don't know if my horses could handle being in stalls since they have been used to freedom for the past 6 years. As 2 yr. olds they were in stalls, then I had 12x24 pipe corrals with shelters, then from 2000 to present they've been in much larger areas.

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You bet Phillip. Have seen horses make a big change going from open pasture to box stalls, or just a different place. Some got better some got worse.

I have had less problems with horses on open pastrure versus the ones raised in box stalls and never been on open pasture. I have come across some real fruit cakes that never did get out of being afraid of being outside.

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You bet Phillip. Have seen horses make a big change going from open pasture to box stalls, or just a different place. Some got better some got worse.

I have had less problems with horses on open pastrure versus the ones raised in box stalls and never been on open pasture. I have come across some real fruit cakes that never did get out of being afraid of being outside.

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Along with acting in a new way one horse came in heat the night of being stalled up and the next day was a fruit-loop in the barn. Young studs just a barn wall away along with 6 to 8 new horses and it reminded me of a train wreck.

Another horse went from a 10yr old little girl who was riding by herself on this horse to a 50ish yr young first time horse owner woman.Total change along with new barn.

I wonder how a horse can be brought along in one setting to handle another without really having the next setting the horse will encounter.

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Along with acting in a new way one horse came in heat the night of being stalled up and the next day was a fruit-loop in the barn. Young studs just a barn wall away along with 6 to 8 new horses and it reminded me of a train wreck.

Another horse went from a 10yr old little girl who was riding by herself on this horse to a 50ish yr young first time horse owner woman.Total change along with new barn.

I wonder how a horse can be brought along in one setting to handle another without really having the next setting the horse will encounter.

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I have seen horses have all sorts of reactions to a change in environment. Though it seems that once a horse has already known a place, or even a sort of set up, things pass smoothly. Like a horse that has been in open pasture for a few years, but was in a stall for years before that, has no problem with going back to a stall.

Going into heat, from what I understand, is a pretty common thing for mares in a new situation with a stud around. My mare is in a stall 12 hours a day with nothing but stallions in the stalls around her. She not only went into heat immediately, but has become much more "marish" than she used to be, on a regular basis. I mean she has become THE boss mare out in the mare pen, and squeels more often. She has a sensitivity that I thought was a back problem lately, but everyone tells me it is her ovaries, and typical of a bossy mare. -Except the *****y behavior and the pain/sensitivity thing never existed before I came to this particular barn!

So I suspect it is due to being surrounded by all the entire boys. I know I spend more time barking over there too- everytime we come in the barn, the noise is earsplitting for a few minutes as they all get worked up.

In two other instances, when she was put in new situations, she (instead of going into heat) she started lactating. This is something I have seen with a few other mares also, suddenly put into new situations with other mares. Like they either go into mating mode or mothering mode.

Geldings just seem to get sorta spooky in a new place, no?

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I have seen horses have all sorts of reactions to a change in environment. Though it seems that once a horse has already known a place, or even a sort of set up, things pass smoothly. Like a horse that has been in open pasture for a few years, but was in a stall for years before that, has no problem with going back to a stall.

Going into heat, from what I understand, is a pretty common thing for mares in a new situation with a stud around. My mare is in a stall 12 hours a day with nothing but stallions in the stalls around her. She not only went into heat immediately, but has become much more "marish" than she used to be, on a regular basis. I mean she has become THE boss mare out in the mare pen, and squeels more often. She has a sensitivity that I thought was a back problem lately, but everyone tells me it is her ovaries, and typical of a bossy mare. -Except the *****y behavior and the pain/sensitivity thing never existed before I came to this particular barn!

So I suspect it is due to being surrounded by all the entire boys. I know I spend more time barking over there too- everytime we come in the barn, the noise is earsplitting for a few minutes as they all get worked up.

In two other instances, when she was put in new situations, she (instead of going into heat) she started lactating. This is something I have seen with a few other mares also, suddenly put into new situations with other mares. Like they either go into mating mode or mothering mode.

Geldings just seem to get sorta spooky in a new place, no?

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quote:

wonder how a horse can be brought along in one setting to handle another without really having the next setting the horse will encounter.

The ones I have seen handle a change of situation better are ones that have been hauled and rode with different horses especially where it has been overnighters or longer.

In my opinion what causes a big problem is when the horse is not allowed to settles in for at least three days or longer. Depending on the horse may take a week or more.

Have to remember to that horse this is a HUGE change. All his buddies ,secure surroundings, and his support system are no longer availiable to them.

I don`t know if this is true or not , but I have read every time a horse gets sold with a new owner they loose part of there personality. That can take a real toll on some horses.

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quote:

wonder how a horse can be brought along in one setting to handle another without really having the next setting the horse will encounter.

The ones I have seen handle a change of situation better are ones that have been hauled and rode with different horses especially where it has been overnighters or longer.

In my opinion what causes a big problem is when the horse is not allowed to settles in for at least three days or longer. Depending on the horse may take a week or more.

Have to remember to that horse this is a HUGE change. All his buddies ,secure surroundings, and his support system are no longer availiable to them.

I don`t know if this is true or not , but I have read every time a horse gets sold with a new owner they loose part of there personality. That can take a real toll on some horses.

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I think that in order for a horse to learn to adjust in any situation, they have to be put in MANY situations in order to become quiet.

That means hauling to alot of different places, staying there for a day or two and then leave again.

The most important thing is to treat the horse no differently than you would at home. In other words dont anticipate trouble.

We haul all over to go trail ride, and camp. Sometimes my mare is stalled, sometimes she is in a makeshift elec. fence, at other times she is picketed. She has been hauled so much that when she comes out of the trailer, it isnt no big deal to her anymore.

All I can say is expose your horse to new enviornments!

HAUL HAUL HAUL!!

[ 01-21-2007, 06:10 PM: Message edited by: creis ]

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I think that in order for a horse to learn to adjust in any situation, they have to be put in MANY situations in order to become quiet.

That means hauling to alot of different places, staying there for a day or two and then leave again.

The most important thing is to treat the horse no differently than you would at home. In other words dont anticipate trouble.

We haul all over to go trail ride, and camp. Sometimes my mare is stalled, sometimes she is in a makeshift elec. fence, at other times she is picketed. She has been hauled so much that when she comes out of the trailer, it isnt no big deal to her anymore.

All I can say is expose your horse to new enviornments!

HAUL HAUL HAUL!!

[ 01-21-2007, 06:10 PM: Message edited by: creis ]

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